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GTD Software comparison

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  • GTD Software comparison

    Hello everyone!
    I've just discovered GTD and I think it's really great. I see already ways how it can influence my productivity. I have big problem choosing best GTD software though. I have few requirements that chosen app have to fulfiil, one of them is android native app to sync todo's. I've already tried these:
    - MyLifeOrganized
    - Doit.im

    Pros & cons:
    MyLifeOrganized
    +good pc & android app
    +infinite hierarchy of tasks
    +DEPENDENCIES
    +folders
    +location based tasks

    +/- fields contaning effort and length for every task BUT no way to use it as a filter (for example when I can't display tasks that are to take only 15 minutes)

    - 45$/year for win app, 25$/year for web syncing with android it's quite a lot
    - no web based app
    - android app still doesn't properly sync hierarchy and labels

    Doit.im
    +great web app
    +great android app
    +FREE for both android and web app
    +web based syncing that works like a charm

    - no DEPENDENCIES (it means You can't tell that one task depends on the other one) so You have to manually indicate next action each time for projects
    - no infinite hierarchy of tasks.. there's only a project that can contain tasks. tasks can't contain tasks...
    - there's no fields to input how long the task should take and how many effort it absorbs..
    -no location based tasks

    For me first choice would by MLO, because it has everything I need but it still doesn't sync properly with android. And it's quite expensive but I could live with that. Regarding that, I'd choose Doit.im, but it doesn't support dependencies so I'd have to manually indicate next action of a project every time I've done a task of that project. Can You please help me finding a proper solution for me? My most important requirements are DEPENDENCIES (I mean a sequence for tasks in project) and good ANDROID APP.

  • #2
    ToodleDo

    Suggest you take a look at ToodleDo (web based task management app) that is very flexible and can easily be set up for GTD as well as the requirements you need. You'll probably want the $15.00 per year version.

    As for native Android apps, ToodleDo themselves do not produce one, but there are a number of 3rd party apps in the Android market that do. Suggest you search "toodledo" in the market. Some are "Ultimate To Do List", DGT Alpha (in alpha but you wouldn't think so, given it's advanced state and stability), and others.

    Comment


    • #3
      Go with MLO (my favourite tool)

      I'd wholeheartedly recommend MLO

      I suffer from "chasing the newest shiny tool out there that will solve all my GTD problems"-itis - invariably, they don't, and I've ended up returning to MLO more times than I care to mention.

      I had a quick look, and you can do the 'Effort list' you mentioned - you need to set up a specific view for it. I can send you details if you go ahead with MLO - just let me know.

      MLO has been a godsend for me, given its flexibility. There are still a few shortcomings, but having said that, there is an iPad App on the way, as well as improvements to the desktop version.

      Afraid I can't comment on the Android App as I'm an iPhone lad - but my understanding from the little I've seen is that the Android App is better than the iPhone App.

      Also - I should mention - I have no affiliation with the development team, just a very happy user

      Hope this Helps....

      Comment


      • #4
        Also tried many and the winner is...

        Hi folks,

        I also tried many other apps for GTD including MLO, Vitalist, RTM, Evernote but I always had the same problem: I had to use separate apps for email, calendar, list manager and reference. It was hard to keep these all together, however these are all belong to my productivity workflow.
        Being tired of it, I read through the Outlook implementation guide whitepaper produced by David Allen Company and spent some hours on implementing it.
        Now, Outlook 2010 have all the things I need. I tweaked it with some smart macros found on the web (for archiving mail, creating task or waiting for from a mail - these are all supported with keyboard shortcuts). I also started to use OneNote for keeping project support and reference which seemlessly integrates into Outlook.

        To have it always with me, I use the Chromatic Dragon software to sync all the tasks to Toodledo and a Google app to sync calendar to Gcal. From this point, I can get to my system from almost any mobile or desktop devices. Even Onenote has web and mobile apps to which it syncs nicely.

        If you want to add some creative support for implementing the natural planning model for projects via super flexible mindmaps, Mindjet's MindManager or Xmind with Xmindlook add-on can be integrated to it also with decent task syncing capabilities.

        So, keep on testing what suits for you the best, I hope I could add some considerable points to that.

        As a bottomline, I always prefer smartphones with physical qwerty keyboard as it is much more convinient for reviewing or capturing new ideas on the go - or eventually write a forum post while sitting in the garden on a sunny Sunday afternoon

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by johnaohman View Post
          Suggest you take a look at ToodleDo (web based task management app) that is very flexible and can easily be set up for GTD as well as the requirements you need. You'll probably want the $15.00 per year version.

          As for native Android apps, ToodleDo themselves do not produce one, but there are a number of 3rd party apps in the Android market that do. Suggest you search "toodledo" in the market. Some are "Ultimate To Do List", DGT Alpha (in alpha but you wouldn't think so, given it's advanced state and stability), and others.
          I'm using the same couple Toodledo and Ultimate To Do. Wherever I am I can use and see my system or directly on the web or through the Ultimate synchronization I have on my android htc smart-phone. I think this system is more user friendly and easy then the Outlook mentioned one

          Comment


          • #6
            For an extensive list that compares and contrasts GTD software for various platforms, see:

            http://www.priacta.com/Articles/Comp...D_Software.php

            I have no connection with the firm providing that list.

            Joe

            Comment


            • #7
              Regarding toodledo, it's like every way leads to toodledo I mean many people suggest me that one. I've taken a look at it and I suppose it doesn't support dependencies which is one of my most important requirements.. Or I omitted something?
              Solutions including outlook is not for me, too complicated and I don't use outlook apart from work.. Any more suggestions are very welcome..
              Regards

              Comment


              • #8
                Concerning mlo having ability to filter task by it's length and effort needed, well, it may does everything I need but still, 70$/year without web app and without proper sync with android.. I hope there is better solution out there

                Comment


                • #9
                  Be careful what you ask for

                  robs23, I just gotta say that if your mind is made up that you have to have dependencies in your software, then you may not be receptive to the main messages of gtd at this time. One of the main ideas of gtd is to get stuff out our heads, sure, but 90%+ of projects just need a next action. Most people who successfully practice gtd don't use software that formally supports dependencies, just as most don't use priorities much. At it happens, I am using software that does support project outlines, dependencies, flags, and a lot of cool stuff [OmniFocus], but I spent a long time learning to use those features in a simple, effective way, and an even longer time resisting the simple disciplines of gtd that are tool-agnostic. Of course, your situation may be completely different from mine.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by mcogilvie View Post
                    robs23, I just gotta say that if your mind is made up that you have to have dependencies in your software, then you may not be receptive to the main messages of gtd at this time. One of the main ideas of gtd is to get stuff out our heads, sure, but 90%+ of projects just need a next action. Most people who successfully practice gtd don't use software that formally supports dependencies, just as most don't use priorities much. At it happens, I am using software that does support project outlines, dependencies, flags, and a lot of cool stuff [OmniFocus], but I spent a long time learning to use those features in a simple, effective way, and an even longer time resisting the simple disciplines of gtd that are tool-agnostic. Of course, your situation may be completely different from mine.
                    Unfortunately I don't know what You mean exactly.. I use dependencies to tell my GTD app what action should take place first, what is the second and so on... So what I actually mean is sequence of actions in project.
                    For example, project "Buy a car" has 3 actions:
                    1. Consider your budget
                    2. Make a list of possible options
                    3. Buy it
                    and they need to take place in same sequence as planned. I can't make list of possible options without knowing what my budget is. So actions 2 & 3 can be finished ONLY if action 1 is done. Thanks to dependencies I don't have to manually indicate action 2 as a next action when action 1 is done. Obviously, indicating manually next action every time is not that bad, but if You have about 100 projects, it may be pain in the ass And on the other hand, if projects have many actions, sometimes easier is to point sequence and dependencies while planning...
                    It's just how I see it...
                    Regards

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by robs23 View Post
                      For example, project "Buy a car" has 3 actions:
                      1. Consider your budget
                      2. Make a list of possible options
                      3. Buy it
                      and they need to take place in same sequence as planned. I can't make list of possible options without knowing what my budget is. So actions 2 & 3 can be finished ONLY if action 1 is done.
                      By definition, only 1 is a next action, 2 and 3 are future actions. So your next actions list should only include action 1, not 2 and 3. If you are going to add in future actions, your system needs to be able to filter so you can look at only the next ones excluding future. Otherwise you'll see actions you can't do anything on.
                      The whole point about having a next actions list rather than an actions list is that things change and you can't always anticipate the next action, it is often different to what you planned, so you can end up having to delete a lot of actions you don't need or are irrelvant.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by robs23 View Post
                        So what I actually mean is sequence of actions in project.
                        For example, project "Buy a car" has 3 actions:
                        1. Consider your budget
                        2. Make a list of possible options
                        3. Buy it
                        and they need to take place in same sequence as planned. I can't make list of possible options without knowing what my budget is. So actions 2 & 3 can be finished ONLY if action 1 is done. Thanks to dependencies I don't have to manually indicate action 2 as a next action when action 1 is done.
                        Thanks for the example! Just to add to Suelin23's comments, if a project is simple and linear, it's usually best to not go too far into the future. Furthermore, your project steps are probably not next actions. Buying a car involves what you need, what you would like, what you can afford, and what's available. Most people are going to bounce back and forth between these things for at least a little bit before settling on a strategy. In terms of budget, "estimate funds on hand available for down payment." is a next action. So is "Thing about how much monthly payment do I want to take on". Later on, you might want to "look at car section of Craigslist." "Buy a car" is not a next action unless you are walking out the door with a checkbook knowing what you're going to buy where. If I were doing this project, I might want to put in the note section of the project, something like:
                        - budget
                        - what I must have: dependable, seats 4 comfortably,....
                        - what I would like: great stereo, mpg > 30, ...
                        - where to shop: Craigslist, local dealer, ...
                        - what's needed to buy: title, certified check, ...
                        - follow-up after buy: insurance,...
                        Notice that this stuff is really project support material, not next actions.
                        FWIW, I struggled for a long time in various ways against the simple practices David Allan advocates. Once I had the basics down, I was able to add just a bit more customization. Good luck!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Well, many thanks for all replies.. Regarding provided example.. it's simplified on purpose, to make it clearer. I realise that those 3 actions are really not actions because they can easily be splitted into more basic actions... I provided that example not to discuss it (though thanks for that!) but to point that dependencies are helpful at planning a project. And yes, I won't be able to set dependencies for every project because sometimes to many things are changing during project. But sometimes, for me quite often, they may be very useful.
                          So if there is any other software, other way to get them implemented into my GTD system, i would appreciate posting that.

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