Forum

  • If you are new to these Forums, please take a moment to register using the fields above.
Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
What Pocket PC phone would you buy today? Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • What Pocket PC phone would you buy today?

    I am approaching proficiency with GTD and am ready to tackle a pocket pc with phone. Do you have any opions about the iPaq h6315 pocket pc phone? Technology is not my top skill so I was wondering if it can basicly plug it in and have it work! I do have an IT guy but he is not familar with GTD. Thanks in advance.

  • #2
    If I were to buy a pocketpc phone...

    ...I wouldn't.

    I like PocketPCs as PDAs, but the phone addition seems like a kludge to me. If you want a decent combo, everyone I know sings praises about the Palm Treo.

    But to answer you question more directly, a pocketpc is a pocketpc is a pocketpc (true for at least the last 18 months, if not longer). Anything that anyone has suggested be implemented on a PocketPC device will work on your iPaq phone edition.

    Comment


    • #3
      I just bought a Pocket PC phone 2 weeks ago. I wanted to buy a mobile for some time and had eyed a PDA too. Since I am travelling long distance every week, every gram counts. So the PPC Phone was the obvious solution. A colleague had it and allowed me to play around a bit. Since it has Outlook Mobile as application, I was able to start immediately, without a learning phase.

      I use notes as my project lists, tasks strictly for un-dated tasks and the calendar for the dated tasks. I used the categories to set up Yellow Pages in Contacts, using the Company field to group the entries ("Hotel", "Hairdresser", "Doctors",...). Can you tell I've been spending a lot of time on the road (i.e. train)?

      Today I set up the HotSynching and made a backup, all painless in less than 30 mins.
      And I set up an Excel spreadsheet shopping list with 250 entries and beamed it over to the PPC. Took some time to open it (400kB), and got hung up when I fiddled around instead of waiting, but after a soft reset everything was fine (hey, it's Windows after all ).

      Comment


      • #4
        On the phone part of my Pocket PC: I haven't done many calls yet, but it is really easy, because you can dial from your Contacts database. Or by hand via the touchscreen. The sound quality is good (but that depends on your provider, as well). Connectivity is at least as good as with the Siemens mobile I had with me a few days, as well.
        And I love to scribble SMS' with the pen thingy, instead of clicking keys.

        Comment


        • #5
          Mobile Edition PocketPCs are too bulky for my taste. But there are distinct advantages. You can learn more at www.pocketpc.com

          I myself am waiting for the Motorola i930 due out in March as it hits all the needs I have. Check out some advance info about it here:
          http://www.smartphonethoughts.com/fo...pic.php?t=4165

          Comment


          • #6
            I've got the Samsung i600, a nice clamshell phone with some PDA functionality (calendar, contacts, tasks, browser, IM, etc.). As a PDA, it's not ideal - it doesn't sync with Outlook's notes and it's built-in task app is pretty weak, but it's a very good phone. For that reason, I've always got it with me - and a weak PDA that's handy is much better (for me) than a great PDA that's too bulky to carry around.

            The one killer feature of this smartphone is a built in voice-recorder which is the fastest way to capture ideas on the fly I've ever used - hit two buttons and start talking, much faster than scribbling something with a stylus or hunting for a pen. The downside is you have to review and transcribe them later. Voice recognition and integration with the PDA and phone features would make this unbeatable. But it's still pretty great.

            Comment


            • #7
              This reminds me of stereo systems. You know the kind with every function in one unit? Well when the CD player goes up in smoke, you send the unit in for repair... guess what? You loose ALL of your music becuase your radio, turntable, tape, etc. was all in that all-in-one unit.

              To me it's the same thing with a phone/PDA. I like having my PocketPC as a separate entity and my phone as another entity.

              If you're like me, I own stuff until it dies! I don't trade in my PDA or phones for the latest thing. If you are that type, than a combo phone/PDA is an expensive item.

              Comment


              • #8
                Maybe Nokia 6670 smartphone?

                Originally posted by zanni
                I've got the Samsung i600, a nice clamshell phone with some PDA functionality (calendar, contacts, tasks, browser, IM, etc.). As a PDA, it's not ideal - it doesn't sync with Outlook's notes and it's built-in task app is pretty weak, but it's a very good phone. For that reason, I've always got it with me - and a weak PDA that's handy is much better (for me) than a great PDA that's too bulky to carry around.

                The one killer feature of this smartphone is a built in voice-recorder which is the fastest way to capture ideas on the fly I've ever used - hit two buttons and start talking, much faster than scribbling something with a stylus or hunting for a pen. The downside is you have to review and transcribe them later. Voice recognition and integration with the PDA and phone features would make this unbeatable. But it's still pretty great.
                I agree that it's better to have handy phone/PDA always with you. Currently I'm using Nokia 6670 smartphone. The screen is rather small but I can put this phone in any pocket - not only XXL pockets needed for many Pocket PCs. Since I am using this device for contacts, reminders, lists, as voice recorder and 1 megapixel camera - it works perfectly.
                Of course there are drawbacks. I do not know why Nokia is not able to stabilize phone-desktop connectivity software. The USB connection does not work with my new WinXP machine at all. Bluetooth connection works awkwardly. But backup and synchronization is posssible.
                TesTeq

                Comment

                Working...
                X