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  • Overloaded Outlook?

    I'm just wondering how many add-in's other people have in Outlook. Mine has been starting slower than ever and I think I need to jettison some of these things. Currently I have the GTD add-in, Clear Context, You Perform, Bells and Whistles, I Hate Spam, Lookout, SnagIt add-in, Send to Mind Manager, Send to One Note and Send to Onfolio. I just got rid of NewsGator as I found that I prefer my rss feeds online. I'm taking a look at SpeedFiler right now too. Is this amount of add-in's normal?

  • #2
    No add-ins.

    I've got no add-ins and both - my computer and I - feel great.

    My computers are on a diet. Just like people - if they eat too much (software), they become slow and the risk of death is higher.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by KevinR
      I'm just wondering how many add-in's other people have in Outlook. Mine has been starting slower than ever and I think I need to jettison some of these things. Currently I have the GTD add-in, Clear Context, You Perform, Bells and Whistles, I Hate Spam, Lookout, SnagIt add-in, Send to Mind Manager, Send to One Note and Send to Onfolio. I just got rid of NewsGator as I found that I prefer my rss feeds online. I'm taking a look at SpeedFiler right now too. Is this amount of add-in's normal?
      This is probably about double what I have. If I were you, I'd always be thining about whether I actually need plugins like these or not. Having said that, I still don't think your system should be that slow. I doubt that any of these uses all that much memory or CPU with the possible exception of Lookout when it's indexing.

      I use Outlook constantly. It's always open. But I faced the fact very early on that if you are going to use it heavily, you need a great deal of memory. In addition to everything slowing down, I found that crashes became more frequent with the computer swapping memory to the HD so much and I thought I was risking data loss. Without knowing how much you've got, I might suggest an upgrade. I've gotten to the point where I wouldn't consider having less than a Gig for my own purposes.

      Tom S.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by KevinR
        Currently I have the GTD add-in, Clear Context, You Perform, Bells and Whistles, I Hate Spam, Lookout, SnagIt add-in, Send to Mind Manager, Send to One Note and Send to Onfolio.
        ...
        Is this amount of add-in's normal?
        Wow! You are really brave. Just thinking about the potential problems makes me so happy I switched to mac and OS X this year.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by mcogilvie
          Wow! You are really brave. Just thinking about the potential problems makes me so happy I switched to mac and OS X this year.
          Yes. I suppose having no software to choose from would, indeed, solve the problem.

          Tom S.

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          • #6
            Ouch....

            I'm guessing Tom is not a fan of Mac.....just a guess, but I think I'm on to something.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Tom Shannon
              Yes. I suppose having no software to choose from would, indeed, solve the problem.
              Yes and no. If you love Outlook, there is Microsoft's Entourage, which is at least comparable to Outlook and better in many ways. I find iCal ok, but not wonderful. There are many information-manager products for macs. As for CRM, Daylite is much better than Act ever was, and the developers are great. Have you looked in retail stores lately? Not much software for sale, really, for any platform. At Compusa, an aisle of Microsoft products, an aisle of games, an aisle of useless crud (clipart collections, recipe programs), an aisle of tax and money software, and an aisle of "utilities." Utilities are things like spam blockers, software firewalls, spyware blockers, et cetera. Most of the latter category of products are not necessary for OS X. I also don't have dll or registry problems. And I have UNIX under the hood. So I'm happy.

              But I think the deeper question is "How much does software help us get things done, and how much does it take away time, money, and energy?" We all have different points at which value outweighs cost, but complicated "solutions" don't work well for me anymore, and I increasingly value simple elegance in my software.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by bassdrone42
                I'm guessing Tom is not a fan of Mac.....just a guess, but I think I'm on to something.
                Perhaps I exaggerated.

                Actually I love macs. But IMO they are under-developed in terms of available software.

                Tom S.
                Last edited by Tom Shannon; 03-09-2006, 05:11 AM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by mcogilvie
                  Yes and no.
                  Your civil answer was probably more than my flippant comment deserved.

                  Thanks,
                  Tom S.

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