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  • GTD on Linux? (2)

    I put this same question on the general GTD forum a short while ago but only got one response, so I thought I'd try again.

    Does anyone have experience of GTD tools on the Linux platform? When I say tools, I'm thinking of off-line list management applications for projects and actions (not just email!).

    So far, on the web I've only found Thinking Rock (which I've tried but didn't like so much), a Beta called Nozbe, and Tomboy. I also know there is a Outlook clone for Linux and I think it has tasks but am not sure how well it works for GTD.

    My reasons for asking are partly curiosity. I've considered using Linux instead of Windows in the past. As far as I can see, available Linux applications cover everything I need except the possible exception of GTD. I've also recommended GTD to a friend but he only uses Linux and I want to suggest tools to try to implement it.

    Thanks in advance for any responses.

  • #2
    GTD on linux

    Originally posted by tominperu View Post
    I put this same question on the general GTD forum a short while ago but only got one response, so I thought I'd try again.

    Does anyone have experience of GTD tools on the Linux platform? When I say tools, I'm thinking of off-line list management applications for projects and actions (not just email!).

    So far, on the web I've only found Thinking Rock (which I've tried but didn't like so much), a Beta called Nozbe, and Tomboy. I also know there is a Outlook clone for Linux and I think it has tasks but am not sure how well it works for GTD.
    Hi!

    I'm using Linux and GTD.

    For lists I use jpilot, which is availiable in most Linux distribrutions. I use it to sync against a Palm Treo 680, and it works very good. So, when I'm at my desk I use jpilot for list management, and when I'm not I use the Treo. Jpilot has a nice user interface, and has a good print utility. I use paper printout of my action, projects and s/m lists during my weekly review.

    For email I now use thunderbird, one of many great email apps. on Linux. The Oulook clone you mention is probably Evolution. It has tasks, but the last time I checked it didn't sync very well with my Treo. The main problem was that it didn't handle the categories very well. I think this issue is solved now, but I have not checked.

    For mindmapping I use freemind, which is easy and fast.

    Hope this helps!

    Tore.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks

      That was just the sort of reply I was hoping for. Some options and evaluations from someone who has real experience.

      Now all I need is to borrow a Linux machine to try jpilot and Evolution.


      Thanks again.

      Comment


      • #4
        Total agreement here. I am only just implementing GTD, but have been on Linux for some time now. So far I have had no problems finding adequate tools. I personally prefer Thunderbird over Evolution in general, but it's a case of what you are used to I guess. I have never been an Outlook user so that might be why. Good luck with it all .

        Comment


        • #5
          resurrection!

          Thought I'd resurrect this thread again!

          I am using Xubuntu Linux at home now and thought I'd check what other Linux GTDers are using in 2009 (assuming there are any).

          I notice that ThinkingRock is available for linux now but wonder how well it works and also whether ThinkingRock can be put on a PDA to sync to Linux. I doubt it can.

          I know JPilot or Evolution with the regular Palm software is another option but I've always found the regular Palm software a bit buggy (I use Chapura Keysuite to sync with my windows outlook tasks at work).

          Of course there are plenty of webGTD tools but I prefer not to rely on those.

          It would be great to have a PDA that could sync with Windows Outlook at work and Linux at home but that is probably a dream too far. But I'd thought I'd check.

          Comment


          • #6
            I'm running ubuntu. I was using Evolution with a palm centro until my college switched their email server over to 2007. Since then - the last few months - I've been imaping using Thunderbird and using jpilot for tasks. It's adequate and the sync between the centro and jpilot is more reliable, but there's several features which jpilot doesn't have or doesn't communicate to my palm. Birthdays, locations for meetings, certain notes (there doesn't seem to be a pattern, but it's rare).

            Both jpilot and evolution are similar to outlook. This is what enables them to sync with the palm tasks, calendars etc. but I have to believe that there are better more gtd-friendly programs which could be devised. I liked the look of tracks, but it won't sync with the palm. For me, mobility is essential. So, I'm interested my self in hearing other linux users opinions. Given the popularity of GTD among the IT crowd, I can't believe that there aren't better apps for linux out there.

            Comment


            • #7
              Hi!

              I'm still, after 4 years+, of using jpilot with GTD and Palm, searching for something better. I have a Centro.

              I actually like the combination very much, simply because it works all the time. Being a programmer myself I have made a few extra scripts which helps me during my weekly review, mostly printouts the way I like then and a few automatic checks.

              I have looked at a lot of different applications, but none sync very well, if at all, against the Palm, or any other smarphone.

              Currently I'm looking at Goosync, which promises to sync against the Google apps. The free version can sync the calendar against google calendar. This works pretty well, but I have experienced a few problems. I'm not sure how it syncs against Google Tasks, which as far as I now isn't good for GTD anyway.

              There are a few pure online GTD apps, but I'm not online all the time, so they wouldn't work for me.

              Tore, still searching for a better Linux GTD app.

              Comment


              • #8
                Resurrection again?

                Figured I would post what I have using regarding GTD and Linux hoping somebody might have a better system. I have not found any system that provides the seemless syncing on LInux that I had with jpilot. Since I am no longer using a Palm device, I have had to find other solutions. Looking at how I use GTD, I have come to the conclusion that I will never find one piece of software that will do everything I want.

                My schedule and tasks revolve around my roles as teacher and parent, so much of the day I am not spending hours at a time working on projects at my computer. My computer acts as the central planning and communications hub, but is not with me at all times. I use multiple calendars to coordinate family, personal and work schedules, and find it essential that I have all my calendar information with me at all times. For my task list, I only need to have with me next actions that don't involve using a computer. Next actions requiring my computer can just be left on it. I need an inbox that will allow me to just quickly dump thoughts, tasks, and ideas for later processing. The inbox needs to be accessed easily without requiring me to take the time to open a program or even switch to a different window. There are some tasks I need to have in a place where they are easily visible, otherwise I will too easily forget them. Finally, for planning, I need some kind of task software that will provide contexts, tags, schedules, notes, links to files, the ability to break tasks into subtasks, and keep the entire mess organized.

                Thunderbird with Lightning is what I use for my calendars. Its task list is simple and syncs well with my cell phone. I have found TreeLine, a simple database/outliner program to work very well for task planning and review. I just copy and paste tasks whose contexts do not involve the use of the computer into Thunderbird then sync with my phone. For the other parts of my system, I have found that Linux provides me with tools that simply are not available using Windows or Apple.

                I am using Openbox instead of Gnome or KDE because it allows me to use something called pipe menus. These are menus that allow the user to interact with scripts. Since I want to see my inbox and have a place on my desktop for something like post-it notes, I use a couple of instasnces of a pipe menu called tasklist.py. I use Conky, a program that allows the user to display a variety of information on the desktop, to display the output from tasklist.py. The problem with TreeLine, Openbox, Conky , and tasklist.py, is all of them require some configuration by the user. To use Openbox, tasklist.py and Conky, the user has to be willing to edit some configuration files.

                This system has taken me awhile to get set up and for now is working reasonably well and takes little effort to maintain and use. Of course, I would love to find an easier and more efficient system.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Tomboy Notes!

                  I love using Tomboy notes. A simple hypertext system, it reminds me a lot of Wikipedia. So no matter how messy the web you weave, you can always just search to find stuff. Awesome! One feature that I think fits well with GTD is you can sort your notes by age to give them a good review once in a while. KISS works for me!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have never used or experienced GTD with Linux but seems that GTD works fine with linux and in a great way . Looking at this post i am thinking to try out with linux.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      i dont use it at work anymore but BasketNotes for linux worked really well for me. its less listy and more freestyle than other software but is, of course, free and open source and can be synced via dropbox to multiple computers.

                      Another point to make tho, at present I use onenote and windows at work, I just tend to sync my lists via dropbox so i dont need to use onenote at home very often. however when I do I have a windows virtual machine inside linux that I can load. You could use a virtual box for any windows software, tho its not ideal.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I use Ubuntu Linux -

                        my tools are
                        Evolution - Email
                        Google Calendar
                        Remember the Milk
                        Evernote
                        Dropbox

                        I use an iPhone so email idownloads through the email app, and the others are cloud apps so sync automatically.

                        Also use 1daylater to track time and cost - which is another cloud app.

                        Linux has prism which is allows me to use cloud apps without a full browser to distract.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Some good offline solutions...

                          If you don't need to get your data onto your phone and plan to keep the tasks local to your computer, the best GTD tool I have ever found was mGSD http://mgsd.tiddlyspot.com/#mGSD

                          Another interesting GTD app is GTDfree http://gtd-free.sourceforge.net/

                          Hope someone will find this information useful.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I use Linux

                            I alternate between Windows and Linux (mostly -buntu derivatives) every few months... usually in frustration. I am partial to cross-platform GTD setups so I am not married to a particular device, OS, etc.

                            With that as background, I have never found anything that beat TodoMatrix... even though this requires a Blackberry. It can be accessed through any web browser but I just love that it is always with me, always flawlessly synced, and is faster than paper.

                            Fortunately I don't need my PC to connect with my Blackberry for any of this functionality so it doesn't matter what OS I am on.

                            -JohnV474

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by tominperu View Post

                              Does anyone have experience of GTD tools on the Linux platform? When I say tools, I'm thinking of off-line list management applications for projects and actions (not just email!).
                              You can try mGSD. Its a single HTML file that contains a wiki system. mGSD is an adapetd tiddly wiki. I like it because when you make tasks you can just click on "n" for next action, "w" for waiting for, "f" for future action.

                              Since it s html you can use it on any system. you must allow to browser to write the data back into the file. thats all.

                              On USb-Stick is goes anywhere...

                              It also has a nice printig feature, so you just see your lists and not the frames and menues.

                              It's worth a try

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