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  • Wood file cabinets for home office

    I am looking for a wooden vertical filing cabinet that is suitable for a home office (actually it is in my bedroom) that is of decent quality. I saw one online "Bush WCXXX52 " (just put that into a search engine to see it) but am hesitatant to buy it from the internet without reccomendations. Any suggestions on this one or others?

  • #2
    You might want to check out Levenger's line of modular file cabinets.

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    • #3
      I recently purchased two of the Levenger modular cabinets, and a while later another two. I just assembled the second set earlier this week.

      They are well made, and assemble fairly easily.

      The one problem with these (and so many cabinets today) is the everything is designed for hanging file folders. I tried the Levenger cabinets with hanging folders - one per manila folder, as per DA's suggestion - but the loss in storage space was huge. I've gone back to using only the manila folders. It looks a bit sloppy, but I can store so many more files it's worth it. I use unused folders and a folder box to take up extra space at the back to keep the folders from falling over.

      - Don

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      • #4
        Still using paper?

        In all seriousness, why not spend the money you would otherwise pay for a file cabinet on a ScanSnap S510 scanner and opt for a paperless life?

        The only paper I have is my birth certificate, my social security card, and a few signed original contracts. Even your back tax records and receipts can be scanned and stores with no problem.

        I originally found the ScanSnap through a post on 43Folders.com about paperless living, and I'm a huge fan. The OCR is fantastic, so you can search for words even from crumpled receipts and it usually brings them up. The initial switch to paperless is a bit time-consuming (if you can hire a young niece or nephew, that makes it easier) but as you go along dropping a few papers in here and there is a breeze.

        The key is to then use a seamless backup system like JungleDisk (which backs up all folders I specified on my computer every five minutes) so in case of a hard drive failure, your files are immediately accessible via Amazon's web servers. This is supremely more secure than a file cabinet which could be stolen, damaged, catch fire, etc.

        I struggled for a long time to find the perfect paper storage furniture solution, only to stumble upon the realization that I didn't actually need any of the paper.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by MarinaMartin View Post
          Even your back tax records and receipts can be scanned and stores with no problem.
          Might check carefully with your lawyer and accountant first. I was told that only my original receipts and other paper backups for my taxes would be considered valid in an audit. Actual statements from your brokerage are also required for IRA information.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Oogiem View Post
            Might check carefully with your lawyer and accountant first. I was told that only my original receipts and other paper backups for my taxes would be considered valid in an audit. Actual statements from your brokerage are also required for IRA information.
            Since 1994, the IRS has allowed for electronic document storage instead of paper storage. Google "Rev. Proc. 97-22" for more specifics, if you're interested.

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            • #7
              As far as I understand you might have seen that somewhere and now would like to get out more information. Could you please let me know what you meant or where you have seen that?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by MarinaMartin View Post
                In all seriousness, why not spend the money you would otherwise pay for a file cabinet on a ScanSnap S510 scanner and opt for a paperless life?

                The only paper I have is my birth certificate, my social security card, and a few signed original contracts. Even your back tax records and receipts can be scanned and stores with no problem.

                I originally found the ScanSnap through a post on 43Folders.com about paperless living, and I'm a huge fan. The OCR is fantastic, so you can search for words even from crumpled receipts and it usually brings them up. The initial switch to paperless is a bit time-consuming (if you can hire a young niece or nephew, that makes it easier) but as you go along dropping a few papers in here and there is a breeze.

                The key is to then use a seamless backup system like JungleDisk (which backs up all folders I specified on my computer every five minutes) so in case of a hard drive failure, your files are immediately accessible via Amazon's web servers. This is supremely more secure than a file cabinet which could be stolen, damaged, catch fire, etc.

                I struggled for a long time to find the perfect paper storage furniture solution, only to stumble upon the realization that I didn't actually need any of the paper.
                What if you're filing a brochure or other multi-page document? Do you scan each page?

                WW

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Will Wyatt View Post
                  What if you're filing a brochure or other multi-page document? Do you scan each page?

                  WW
                  The ScanSnap scanner lets you drop multiple pages in at once, and scans double-sided. (It is not a flatbed scanner.) Brochures I just put in sideways, and for thicker stapled documents, I just remove the staples and drop the stack in.

                  I am in no way affiliated with the company but I give major props to Fujitsu for the scanner. It's scans are fantastic quality, the OCR is excellent, and the scanner itself is very easy to use (and even folds tightly away!).

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