Forum

  • If you are new to these Forums, please take a moment to register using the fields above.
Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Projects level Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Projects level

    I'm not a new comer to GTD. I use GTD for a couple of years. I feel oK with runway level. I have quite a lot of Next Actions in my system. I love my Goals that I set yearly and then fulfill them. My only concern now is Project level.

    When I enter new Next Action for me it's easier not to put in a Project for it. My internal voice say that the outcome is obvious and there's no sense to spend time on entering it. Let's say I have a "MBA" in my inbox. My dialog: I probably want to get through MBA. There're different options but I'm not sure about why I need to do it and what is the best option. So I decide to speak to my boss and put @Call-Chat Boss what is MBA for and what is the best option".

    And I can say I do fine without a complete Project list.

    On the other hand, I understand that I'm missing some interconnection between Goals and Runway level. I like to review goals and feel I'm moving somewhere. I like my runway that gives me internal control. When I look at my Project list I don't feel anything. What can I do to start FEELING the Project level?

    Here's an example of my Project list and associated NAs just in case:

    - Studied one Spanish textbook - Put new words from Lesson 1 into the system
    - Started regular fitness sessions to lift body 10 times - Daily sessions scheduled
    - Got equipment for orders placed through XYZ comp - @Waiting Smith to place orders
    - Got discount for software development from XYZ - @Waiting Whipps to send a letter confirming the discount level
    etc.

  • #2
    No answers = no sense in project level?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Ekaterina View Post
      Here's an example of my Project list and associated NAs just in case:

      - Studied one Spanish textbook - Put new words from Lesson 1 into the system
      - Started regular fitness sessions to lift body 10 times - Daily sessions scheduled
      - Got equipment for orders placed through XYZ comp - @Waiting Smith to place orders
      - Got discount for software development from XYZ - @Waiting Whipps to send a letter confirming the discount level
      etc.
      Your examples don't seem phrased in a very project-like way to me. Yours are written like a very boring report on what you did. Here are some alternatives:

      Minimum fluency in Spanish achieved
      Fitness raised to higher level
      Equipment for X ordered
      Software development negotiated

      Notice that there are no extraneous details: You are not interested in studying some particular book, you want to be fluent in Spanish. You want to be more fit. Part of your job is handle certain issues.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Ekaterina View Post
        - Studied one Spanish textbook - Put new words from Lesson 1 into the system
        This is a pretty good example so I'll use it.

        Okay, so you've got the Next Action of "Put new words from Lesson 1 into the system" on your Next Actions list. Great. You eventually get around to completing that Next Action. Fantastic.

        Then what happens?

        Somehow you probably want to get the new Next Action(s) for this project into your system -- "Read Lesson 2" or whatever. How exactly is that going to happen?

        What many people do, and it often works fine, is that when you finish with Lesson 1, you just know in your brain what the Next Action is, and you know that you need to put it into your system, so you just do it.

        However, some people don't want to carry around all their projects in their brains like that. It depends on a lot of things; the individual person, the number and types of projects, etc.

        So one of the purposes of the Projects list is so that when you see "Study Spanish textbook" on the Projects list during the Weekly Review, you have a chance to notice that you finished all the Next Actions so far on that project, and to put the new Next Actions (either from your brain or from a project plan or both) into the system. Or decide that the project is complete, successfully or not, or should be moved into Someday/Maybe, or whatever.



        Cheers,
        Roger

        Comment


        • #5
          Surely if you don't have your projects list and add/review it regularly then things are going to fall through the cracks. Not sure you need to 'feel it' but it more of a practical thing

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by mcogilvie View Post
            Your examples don't seem phrased in a very project-like way to me. Yours are written like a very boring report on what you did. Here are some alternatives:

            Minimum fluency in Spanish achieved
            Fitness raised to higher level
            Equipment for X ordered
            Software development negotiated

            Notice that there are no extraneous details: You are not interested in studying some particular book, you want to be fluent in Spanish. You want to be more fit. Part of your job is handle certain issues.
            I thought that it's my year GOALs what you described as projects. I want to br more fluent in Spanish in a year or want to be more fit.

            Comment


            • #7
              Roger, my goals are to remind what should be done. All the rest are next actions. Please help!

              Comment


              • #8
                Sorry, I didn't understand that. But I do have the sense that we're getting somewhere, so please try again.



                Cheers,
                Roger

                Comment


                • #9
                  Distinguishing between projects and goals can be tricky at times. That's why D.A. published a recommendation that most projects fit into a 9-12 month time frame at the most. That's not true for *every* project or situation but it's a good measure for many. Most importantly, a project (like a goal) must have a clearly defined outcome.

                  Here's how you might break your goal down to the project and action level:
                  • Goal: Get an MBA (this will take years)
                  • Project: Set up school for MBA (done when a university is selected and enrollment is completed. Financial arrangements might also be part of this project. Could take weeks or months to complete.)
                  • Action: Search for schools with MBA programs (@Computer, the current physical action you can take right now to move foward on getting school set up.)

                  As you complete these projects you'll define more along the way to getting your MBA. Once in school, class assignments will turn into actions and projects, so will administrative things like setting up classes for next semester or applying for scholarships or grants.

                  I hope this helps some.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Really clarify the project--Learning from my mistake

                    Although the whole point is to define terms so they are useful for you, and what works for one person may not work for another.... I made the mistake of confusing a value or higher level "purpose" with a project. My relative was in a nursing home and I defined my project as "ensuring humane treatment". What I really needed to do was define the project in terms of frequency of visits, attending meetings, monitoring food, meds, the finances, bringing in decorations and tasty foods etc. I might have been able to make the whole awful thing less stressful for myself if I was more clear and specific. I would have known if what I was doing was enough given my resources and not be guilt ridden for not doing enough. People who can define their projects clearly are blessing themselves multifold.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Jamie Elis View Post
                      I made the mistake of confusing a value or higher level "purpose" with a project. My relative was in a nursing home and I defined my project as "ensuring humane treatment". What I really needed to do was define the project in terms of frequency of visits, attending meetings, monitoring food, meds, the finances, bringing in decorations and tasty foods etc. I might have been able to make the whole awful thing less stressful for myself if I was more clear and specific. I would have known if what I was doing was enough given my resources and not be guilt ridden for not doing enough.
                      Thanks for sharing, I found it very helpful in thinking about my aging parents.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X