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New, maybe not so new, to GTD

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  • New, maybe not so new, to GTD

    I learned about the Getting Things Done methodology through the App Store on my iPod touch in mid-2010. Maybe I'm too young to do GTD but I admit that I've tried to implement it. I ordered a planner at the start of the school year and bought a separate app on my iPod touch to keep track of my semesters. With this already in place, plus a non-GTD task manager app I purchased earlier, I was hesitant to try out GTD.

    I don't own the book, sadly, but I know enough through PDFs and some blogs that explain the concept of GTD and how it works. That's how I discovered Cultured Code's Things and the Omni Group's OmniFocus. I currently am using OmniFocus to manage a database of thirty-five projects. But I have a feeling I am missing something.

    I am still (unfortunately) on the quest to find the perfect system I can trust to hold my info. I don't expect it to be GTD-compliant, but flexible enough that I can tweak it to match my style. OmniFocus has been a joy to use with my small fingers on my iPod touch, but, as I said earlier, I have a feeling I might be missing something.

    I am considering switching to a paper planner that I can use alongside my school planner. Can any of you recommend some formats or planners to use? I do prefer binders instead of notebooks so I can switch papers around, but if it is workable I'll try it out.

  • #2
    welcome!

    Although it sounds like you are on a good path, you would be wise to read the book. You may have the main idea but the intangibles are worth it too, even if you end up annoyed by the patter and smug tone, and even if you are someone that does well cobbling information together. Also, a shared "bible" makes it easier to enter into the discussion on a forum such as this. I suspect you have will enjoy sharing your insights as you develop your system.

    As to paper calendar--first question is what view do you like to work from? daily, monthly, etc. Try to avoid multiple calendars.. Exception is if you are using a secondary calender for tracking something. Most of us with families or teams need two, one for our own planning and one for communicating. My biggest fear with paper is losing the thing but loss happens with electronic methods too. There is also the issue of weight and volume if you carry the thing around. Although I am very lost without my Palm I enjoy having the paper calendar at hand when I am on phone making appointments. I would strongly suggest that you put everything, for each class, your life, your friends birthdays, etc on one calendar. Keep it open during classes, students are constantly bombarded with changes of dates and locations and the data flows from many sources. Good luck and tell us how are doing with your effort.

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    • #3
      You'll be far ahead of your peers!

      Originally posted by elizabethm View Post
      I learned about the Getting Things Done methodology through the App Store on my iPod touch in mid-2010. Maybe I'm too young to do GTD but I admit that I've tried to implement it. I ordered a planner at the start of the school year and bought a separate app on my iPod touch to keep track of my semesters. With this already in place, plus a non-GTD task manager app I purchased earlier, I was hesitant to try out GTD.
      You are not too young! It's great that you want to organize your life early. You'll be able to avoid many bad habits and you'll be far ahead of your peers!

      By the way - read the GTD book!

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      • #4
        The source

        I learned about GTD in almost the exact same way and spent well over a year working off blogs, reports, PDFs, etc. I certain thought I knew what I was doing but for some reason, things just didn't really work the way I wanted them too.

        The best thing I ever did was go to the source and buy GTD and making it all work. And read them both. After the first read I realized that David knew magnitudes more about his own system and it's nearly infinite flexibility than any blogger I'd read (43 folders, zen to done, nozbe, and many others included). I have now read GTD a total of 7 times and making it all work a total of 3 times, not including frequent referencing. That may seem a bit exaggerated but they are by far the best sources available to someone who can't afford a seminar. I'm still learning from just those two books. And the most important part, I calm, cool, and collected just like David teaches we should be when exercising GTD. GTD, from David (or his highly trained team), is a game changer.

        Good luck!

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        • #5
          For those on a budget, the GTD book is available at many libraries.
          I highly recommend reading it.

          Ken

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          • #6
            Thank you!

            Thank you for your replies. I'll try to snag the book next time I pass by a bookstore. But my mind has been befuddled with GTD lately and well, this would be a good chance to start all over again at the beginning. I've fallen off the wagon and am hoping I'll be back soon.
            Last edited by elizabethm; 03-24-2011, 08:51 PM. Reason: Added additional information.

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