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Transition to GTD

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  • Transition to GTD

    I am a long term user of the Franklin Covey system of time and life planning. I have read the GTD book and admire the author and the quality of imput on this forum. There is a dynamism surrounding the company and its concepts that has long since passed in the declining Franklin Covey organisation. The logic of GTD is compelling, yet I feel that the 'groundedness' of the FC system with its focus on Roles (and relationships) and attached goals is neater and easier to define and manage. I fear the GTD will be an ever expanding set of lists that is difficult to prioritise and get my head around on a daily basis. I am concerned I will not act on the items needing most priority and leave many things slipping through cracks.

    Is there anybody out there who has made the transition and if so can you illuminate what experience you had?

  • #2
    FC to GTD transition

    I originally though of this as a transition but in reviewing the end result I actually found I had "merged" the 2 approaches and chosen the bits from each that work for me. In fact, I think that FC and GTD complement each other really well by compensating for each others weaknesses.

    In particular, I still use the FC Mission Statement, Roles, Values, Long Term Goals for the top level stuff (20,000 - 50,000 feet in GTD terms).

    For the operational day to day work I am more GTD based and have dropped the FC Short Terms Goals, PDTL and DRE in place of Projects and Next Actions.

    My interface between FC and GTD is that my Projects usually relate to my goals.

    I could summarise by saying that FC is great for defining personal growth, development and objectives but GTD is what actually makes it all happen.

    I would recommend doing a search on this board for contributions by Steve Pavlina as my approach is similar to his and he has contributed some excellent explanations and ideas.

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    • #3
      Re: Transition to GTD

      I fear the GTD will be an ever expanding set of lists that is difficult to prioritise and get my head around on a daily basis. I am concerned I will not act on the items needing most priority and leave many things slipping through cracks.

      I don't know how to describe this any other way than to say:

      These ever expanding lists already exist. Most people that I work for already have all their next actions defined, at some level, and captured. The only difference in "pre" to "post" assessment is we work together to get those action reminders out of people's heads, off their desks, out of their folders...into an external system that is current and trustworthy.

      The actions come FROM:

      Roles
      Goals
      Responsibilities
      Areas of Focus

      So, look at all the work you have, at all levels/priorities, and identify next steps. The "process" of Getting Things Done remains the same (and, it's not just what we teach, it's how the world works...)

      - Identify (and identify with ) successful outcomes; and
      - Identify and take a next action.

      The lists only grow because a lot of next actions we think about, we can't do here...we have to be there.

      http://www.davidco.com/coaches_corne...article41.html

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      • #4
        On the "ever-expanding lists" topic, I had the same concern when adopting GTD. Human desires are infinite, right? Man's reach exceeds his grasp and all that. Won't my lists grow without bound?

        The answer, to my great surprise, turned out to be "no." I myself started with 110 next actions, and as of this week (six months later) I'm down in the 60's! The first week, I shrank my "next actions" list by 20 items. I expect my next actions list to contract even more over the next six months before it reaches a minimum.

        My "Someday/Maybe" list has grown, but all the things on that list look like so much fun that I can't wait to get to them, so they cause me no stress whatsoever.

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        • #5
          Re: Transition to GTD

          I also came to GTD from FC. I think you expressed very well my own feelings about the changes in FC.

          My suggestion is to layer the elements from FC you find most helpful on top of the basic GTD workflow process. I find that the DA altitude analogy
          (0 = next actions, 10K feet=projects, 20K feet= current roles, et cetera) works fine, but you can use the FC terminology. Just review stuff at the different levels as often as you feel you need to, always making sure to look at the project level at least weekly. At the level of projects and next actions, GTD is by far the easiest and most effective way to maintain everything.

          Mike

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          • #6
            thanks

            I would really like to thank the folks who replied to my post regarding transitioning from using Franklin Covey for a long time to GTD. I am amazed at both the quality of the responses and the kind hearted nature of the people who are making it happen in their lives using GTD. This is truly a gem of a community and I am glad to be a part of it from Australia.

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            • #7
              Re: thanks

              Originally posted by bizcoaching
              I would really like to thank the folks who replied to my post regarding transitioning from using Franklin Covey for a long time to GTD. I am amazed at both the quality of the responses and the kind hearted nature of the people who are making it happen in their lives using GTD. This is truly a gem of a community and I am glad to be a part of it from Australia.
              That is the truth. This board has a uniquely kind spirit and an unusual attitude of rushing in to help that I have really come to cherish. Too many times, those who are "in the know" can get impatient or even dismissive of those just starting out.

              Here you find a large group of really committed and terrificly bright people who have an ample supply of compassion and concern and share, not to make themselves look better, but in the best spirit of support and cooperation.

              We don't take the time to say "Thanks" often enough in our lives - I'd like to thank everyone I've "met" here for the inspiration, guidance, creativity, and support they've provided me and the rest of the community. It's why I come back every day.

              --Marc

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              • #8
                I'd like to say something witty, original or quote worthy about the people who make this board...but I wont...instead I'll just and my thanks to those already expressed in this thread.

                Insert Big Group Hug Emoticon

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                • #9
                  dontchajusthateit !!
                  Forgot to login before posting a reply
                  refer guest post immediately above

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