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  • @Home list

    My @Home list keeps growing because for me home equals to rest not work I believe I'm not alone here. I think of renaming that list to make it more attractive. Any ideas?

  • #2
    I have a few different contexts for this:
    @Household
    @HomeComputer
    @Garden
    @Errands (work & home combined)

    If I had all these in one list, I would probably give up!!!
    I also have a long Someday/Maybe for home to try to combat feelings of overwhelm from my home list.

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    • #3
      all your contexts assume work. They don't seem like fun or rest after work

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      • #4
        Renaming your list isn't going to make those actions more appealing!

        I've had this problem quite often. What really matters is not how quickly those items are getting done; it's how good I feel about not doing them. If that list grows to an unmanageable size then it's time for pruning, incubating, delegating and renegotiating those agreements on that list.

        Perhaps it's move some of the projects those are related to to S/M (emphasis "Someday"). Maybe you need to call in a professional instead of trying to tackle that home improvement or major cleaning project yourself. Or maybe you might need to not make some of those agreements (e.g. The sealer on my garage floor is peeling up; so what? It's a garage floor, not a kitchen floor!)

        Another thing I often do in addition to the above is tag the actions on that list that would take less than 10 minutes to finish. I'm often surprised at how many those are. If my gut isn't telling me to do any action in particular then I just start working those tagged items from top to bottom. I call this "pruning by doing".

        Good luck.

        Comment


        • #5
          Oleg2011
          all your contexts assume work. They don't seem like fun or rest after work
          I'd never really looked at that way!

          I enjoy doing stuff in the garden so it doesn't feel too much like work. Some of my errands are fun, like buying new clothes or getting a library book that I would really like to read. Some of my computer stuff involves doing things I enjoy too, like creating websites.
          I must admit though that I don't tend to put a lot of my "fun" stuff on my lists (I'm still working on that) - instead I will look at my lists and make a conscious decision that I don't want to do any of it and go off and do something else.

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          • #6
            Oh my no, you are certainly not alone.

            Maturity in GTD comes when you recognize that you are the master of your lists; they work for you. They are not your master (or slave-driver, the way a lot of people treat them!).

            I think one key to GTD at home is to recognize that there is a minimum level of done-ness that is required day-to-day. For me, that means dishes must be done; laundry must be done; food must be in the refrigerator; trash gets taken out on Mondays; pets and children must be cared for. This is a different comfort level for everyone. Some people are more neatnik than others. Decide on that minimum level, and work with your spouse/kids (if applicable) to establish a routine for that minimum level of done-ness that lets you feel at ease in your house.

            Be aware of deadlines as far as bills to be paid, projects to be completed by a certain date, etc. That stuff goes on your calendar.

            Beyond that, let your list go undone during the week. If you work long hours every weekday, then get to your minimum level of done-ness and then relax and have fun.

            That means your action list remains untouched (though you should look at it once in a while, just to make sure you're not missing deadlines or priorities aren't changing). On weekends, you can power through that list. If you find a lot of items on your list aren't getting done for a long time, it means you either need to shift activities on your nights and weekends, you need to delegate/spend money and hire someone, or you need to put those items on the someday-maybe list.

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            • #7
              I don't have that problem, as home=rest is such an alien concept.
              To me home=second job, as a homemaker, mum, cook, cleaner etc.
              For me the challenge is to remember I need to take time to rest and have fun and make some time for that.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by cojo View Post
                Maturity in GTD comes when you recognize that you are the master of your lists; they work for you. They are not your master (or slave-driver, the way a lot of people treat them!).
                Love this. Well said.

                Comment


                • #9
                  It might be worthwhile thinking about where your NAs are located, or what paper/computer system you use. I found a lot of resistance trying to look at the same software out of work as in work. When I got home the last thing I wanted to do was fire up the same system Iv been staring at for 8 hours.

                  Nowadays my @home list lives on my fridge, on paper, in bright green ink. Since I rarely have more than a dozen things on there its no biggie, and the 'friendliness' really helps me actually use it.

                  And of couse this raises the potential that, dare i say it, other people might do some stuff from the list. Miracles do happen!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by cojo View Post
                    Oh my no, you are certainly not alone.

                    Maturity in GTD comes when you recognize that you are the master of your lists; they work for you. They are not your master (or slave-driver, the way a lot of people treat them!).

                    I think one key to GTD at home is to recognize that there is a minimum level of done-ness that is required day-to-day. For me, that means dishes must be done; laundry must be done; food must be in the refrigerator; trash gets taken out on Mondays; pets and children must be cared for. This is a different comfort level for everyone. Some people are more neatnik than others. Decide on that minimum level, and work with your spouse/kids (if applicable) to establish a routine for that minimum level of done-ness that lets you feel at ease in your house.

                    Be aware of deadlines as far as bills to be paid, projects to be completed by a certain date, etc. That stuff goes on your calendar.

                    Beyond that, let your list go undone during the week. If you work long hours every weekday, then get to your minimum level of done-ness and then relax and have fun.

                    That means your action list remains untouched (though you should look at it once in a while, just to make sure you're not missing deadlines or priorities aren't changing). On weekends, you can power through that list. If you find a lot of items on your list aren't getting done for a long time, it means you either need to shift activities on your nights and weekends, you need to delegate/spend money and hire someone, or you need to put those items on the someday-maybe list.
                    Thank you so much Cojo, you've put into words the perspective I needed!

                    Comment

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