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  • #16
    Originally posted by pxt View Post
    If you had understood it, then you would have contributed something to this discussion.

    Useless.
    What's up with the attitude? Completely unnecessary and "useless", too!

    Comment


    • #17
      Making It All Work makes it work

      Originally posted by pxt View Post
      Make your mind up. Does it have the answers or are you not sure?
      Making It All Work does a great job explaining the Horizons of Focus and how they fit into GTD. But, the problem some people have is trying to cram the horizons into a tool like Omnifocus.

      Your life's meaning doesn't fit into a project, it is all of your projects (which may give you pause the next time you look at your projects). If your projects aren't part of a plan to get you to your goals, then you are going to feel it; you can't neglect the 30,000 and 40,000 K view of what you are doing.

      The tools, in my opinion, work to capture the 10K and 20K. Completing the tasks, the "do," is how you achieve at 30-50K.

      Comment


      • #18
        You might like the chart I posted (5th post in "defining goals in vision" thread).
        After reading "Making it All Work" I had a clearer idea of what the Horizons of Focus
        are, and made the chart to express my understanding.

        Comment


        • #19
          I participated in a discussion about this when I was a GTD connect member (currently, I am not). What we tried to capture was the question that each of the levels asks. I can't remember the answers, but it made sense at the time. Will somebody who is a member of both forums re-post this here?

          Thanks,
          Rob

          Comment


          • #20
            I'll chime in

            Hi, ArcCaster..miss you over in Connect

            Here are the definitions:

            10,000: Projects
            20,000: Areas of Focus and responsibility
            30,000: Goals and Objectives (next 12-24 months)
            40,000: Vision: Long-term outcomes and ideal scenarios/goals
            50,000: Purpose and Core Values - why am I doing this?

            Hope this helps.

            Comment


            • #21
              Thanks Barb,

              Good to hear from you

              That is a start. I would like to add the questions. That is, the reason we wrestle a little with the levels is they are described as 'things' or as nouns. If we describe each level as a question that must be answered, we have now defined the levels in terms of what they mean to us.

              The ones I think I remember are:

              Project -- what outcome am I committed to work toward over the next few months?
              Next Action -- What is the the next sharply-defined step (this is almost like a bookmark) toward that project outcome?

              And possibly:
              Vision -- what would it look like, feel like, taste like, if my project outcome were achieved?
              Goal -- what outcome (possiblly unachievable) do I want to shoot for?
              Purpose -- Why am I doing all this stuff?

              Thanks,
              Rob

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by ArcCaster View Post
                Thanks Barb,

                Good to hear from you

                That is a start. I would like to add the questions. That is, the reason we wrestle a little with the levels is they are described as 'things' or as nouns. If we describe each level as a question that must be answered, we have now defined the levels in terms of what they mean to us.

                The ones I think I remember are:

                Project -- what outcome am I committed to work toward over the next few months?
                Next Action -- What is the the next sharply-defined step (this is almost like a bookmark) toward that project outcome?

                And possibly:
                Vision -- what would it look like, feel like, taste like, if my project outcome were achieved?
                Goal -- what outcome (possiblly unachievable) do I want to shoot for?
                Purpose -- Why am I doing all this stuff?

                Thanks,
                Rob
                More...
                50,000: In addition to "why" - What are the critical behaviors?
                40,000: What it will look, sound, feel like with successful implementation.
                30,000: What do we want and need to accomplish, specifically, within the next 12-24 months, to make this happen?
                20,000: What am I responsible for maintaining in my life? What roles do I play?
                10,000: What are the outcomes we want to achieve that require more than one action? (completed within one year)? What does wild success look like? What does "done" look like?
                Runway: What is the next physical, visible action?

                Source: David Allen Co. GTD Templates--embellished by experience

                I'd also like to add that most people probably don't get beyond maybe 30,000 feet in the first 1-2 years. I know I sure didn't. If you're just starting out with GTD, learning about next actions and projects and getting that system set up is pretty all-consuming. That's why learning GTD is a process and, frankly, so much fun! Take your time! If you can't spout your 50K reason for being on earth by the end of the first year, you just joined a huge club!

                Comment


                • #23
                  Thanks Barb,

                  Rob

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    See my edits

                    Rob,

                    I was editing while you were thanking me. Wouldn't you agree with my last paragraph?

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Hi Barb,

                      Yes, no, and a tangent

                      Starting with the tangent:

                      Initially, working at the next action and the project level, I had things on my lists that just would not go away. I could not mark them complete, no matter how much time I spent on them. My lists became very irritating

                      Turns out these persistent items did not belong at the next action or the project level. They were higher level. Once I moved them up, my life became saner, and I started crossing things off my project and next action lists. So, you need to know the definition of the higher levels so that you don't stick everything at the lowest two levels.

                      Yes -- agreed -- still looking for completeness at the high levels.

                      No -- However, right from the first day, you can put some general stuff there. For example, something that is easy to add to purpose is to enhance the lives of those you intersect with. Seems like a simple general purpose statement -- but it can still be a guiding thought and get you started. And, if you have ever taken a Myers Briggs or Kiersey inventory, your 'type' can go at the higher level (labels like 'teacher' or 'healer', etc). And from that, you can work your way down to lower-level implications. These are not necessarily THE answers -- but they are seeds that you can sow early, giving them time to germinate or to percolate, and maybe they become more 'you-specific' over time.

                      Wouldn't you agree, Barb?

                      Rob
                      Last edited by ArcCaster; 01-16-2012, 11:11 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Yes..qualified

                        Originally posted by ArcCaster View Post
                        Hi Barb,

                        Yes, no, and a tangent

                        Starting with the tangent:

                        Initially, working at the next action and the project level, I had things on my lists that just would not go away. I could not mark them complete, no matter how much time I spent on them. My lists became very irritating

                        Turns out these persistent items did not belong at the next action or the project level. They were higher level. Once I moved them up, my life became saner, and I started crossing things off my project and next action lists. So, you need to know the definition of the higher levels so that you don't stick everything at the lowest two levels.

                        Yes -- agreed -- still looking for completeness at the high levels.

                        No -- However, right from the first day, you can put some general stuff there. For example, something that is easy to add to purpose is to enhance the lives of those you intersect with. Seems like a simple general purpose statement -- but it can still be a guiding thought and get you started. And, if you have ever taken a Myers Briggs or Kiersey inventory, your 'type' can go at the higher level (labels like 'teacher' or 'healer', etc). And from that, you can work your way down to lower-level implications. These are not necessarily THE answers -- but they are seeds that you can sow early, giving them time to germinate or to percolate, and maybe they become more 'you-specific' over time.

                        Wouldn't you agree, Barb?

                        Rob
                        I agree with all that you've said Rob, but it wasn't my journey. Perhaps it was due to where I was in my life when I was implementing GTD (right around 9/11, just taken a golden parachute, thinking about starting my own business), but I really had all I could do to wrap my blond brain around the basic stuff--maybe through Areas of Focus. Of course, Making it All Work had not yet been written, there was no GTD Connect, I'd never been to a public seminar, etc. Trying to put myself in the shoes of someone who, say, is a super busy professional and a parent with TONS of stuff coming at them and maybe zero time for reflection--well, I think that person is going to probably have a longer journey than someone who has lots of quiet time.

                        I guess the reason I'm putting all this out there is just to encourage anyone who, like me, is taking a while to implement GTD and maybe struggling a bit-- to think of it as a process. Heck, if all you do right away is set up some basic lists you are SO much ahead of where you used to be. And then that Weekly Review sneaks in (and BOY that habit sure does change a lot of things)...if you improve by just 1% per day, think where you'll be in a year! That may seem a long way off, but that year is going to pass anyway....

                        I hope this makes sense. I'm happy to answer questions if it doesn't.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Barb - I always love reading your level-headed responses. It's a blast being on Connect with you.

                          To the original point, I found that my entry into the higher elevations was through mind mapping. I sat down with a white sheet of cardstock and wrote "20,000 - Areas of Focus" in the center then just started scrawling down whatever surfaced. I didn't worry about where I placed things on the page, it happened more or less organically. And I didn't worry of about being complete. Heck, on the higher levels, I didn't even worry about being entirely realistic! My only goal was to dump onto paper what Goals, Vision and Purpose meant to me on that day. I have refined and rewritten them over time but I'm always surprised that the "truth" of me always comes into sharp focus.

                          Thanks for letting me chime in.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Mindmaps

                            Hi Arts!

                            Thanks for the kind words, Arts! I'd like to add that I had a pretty crappy day yesterday and, between you and Rob, I'm feeling pretty good!

                            Mindmaps are GREAT! I use them to map out my higher levels too. There is something about seeing it all visually that unlocks things for me. I typically use them to do all my project planning as well.

                            I wrote my 2012 goals about a month ago, on a mindmap, but deleted several last week. I have a tendency to think I can make great progress across all areas of my life so I write dozens of goals. That becomes overwhelming so I've learned to focus on no more than about 5 or so. I've learned too, over the years, to set up goals so they really attract me, are completely doable, and things I can accomplish well before the end of the year (I like to have "wins" coming at me all the time). At least one goal always chips away at something longer term.

                            Somehow this whole process is easier for me if I use a mindmap.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              If Steve jobs had a 40k vision, it would not be what he turned out to be. I guess. So do we really need to make one?

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by AlexanderChow View Post
                                If Steve jobs had a 40k vision, it would not be what he turned out to be. I guess. So do we really need to make one?
                                The point is that we always make one in our heads. The question is: can we profit by making us aware of what that is, writing it down, changing it (for the better)?

                                Regarding Steve Jobs, I would say he was fortunate enough to turn his vision into reality.

                                My guess is you want to be warry to not think to small (and then not have room for big, inovative ideas). This happens easily when we become too early to specific.

                                Jobs wanted to make Apple an icon of consumer electronics in the digital age. His example was Sony of the analogous age. This was his vision, the details like offering a portable music player in 5 different colors were not part of the overall vision. It would be foolish to narrow yourself down to a specific detail just because you saw it in your vision. The forrest, the forrest.

                                Comment

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