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  • Project plan as a criteria for a project list

    I just mentioned I don't need project list. That was because most of my projects didn't need any reminder. They were self obvious. For example, I have a goal to train my sales staff. I know that my technical presales is capable to do that. I don't need any project reminder to finish that because it's just one-two steps away: call the presales regarding the training and then wait when it's done. On the other hand some of the projects need to be reminded of. And those projects always require a project plan. Doe example, all of our sales activities require planning.

    I think that a criteria of a project that needs to land on a project list is a project plan. If it requires a project plan then it should be on the project list. If not then it's not needed.

  • #2
    For me that principle would not work. My projects normally don't have a project plan as they are (just as your example) very simple projects. Still, as they require more than one step, I need to have a project list to make sure I don't drop projects unintentionally. When I'm doing work, I work off my action lists and check things off when they are done. Sometimes I make a note of the next action on another action list or on a note for my inbox, but I don't want to rely on that only to make sure I don't drop projects, as that would _require_ me to always make a decision on the next action after finishing an action on the action list. I prefer to keep the different five stages of workflow separate so that I can focus on doing when I'm doing and not have to be processing, organizing or reviewing at that moment.

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    • #3
      are you OK with it?

      Hi, Solyanov,

      I've been following your posts about projects, and I'd like to know if you're OK with not having a projects list... are you? If you don't need one in your system, I'm certainly not going to tell you that you have to have one.

      The bottom line is... Project lists are a key component of GTD. They're supposed to make it easier to get things done.

      Keeping everything in your head is OK with me if it works for you... it's not GTD, but you're the boss of your system and I totally respect that!

      But if it's working fine for you, what is it that we can do to support you? Are you asking for feedback, or are you sharing your strategy? What is it that you're looking for here on Connect that you're not getting yet?

      Dena

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      • #4
        Thanks Dena!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by mthar1 View Post
          When I'm doing work, I work off my action lists and check things off when they are done. Sometimes I make a note of the next action on another action list or on a note for my inbox, but I don't want to rely on that only to make sure I don't drop projects, as that would _require_ me to always make a decision on the next action after finishing an action on the action list.
          But you could use the "checked-off as done" next actions (which would then be past actions, haha) as reminders to generate the subsequent action.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by artsinaction View Post
            Keeping everything in your head
            Not to create the impression that I am living without a projects list, but I don't see how Solyanov is keeping everything in his head.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Cpu_Modern View Post
              But you could use the "checked-off as done" next actions (which would then be past actions, haha) as reminders to generate the subsequent action.
              Yup, I could do that. In my system though, that would require more rather than less work. Besides, after thinking more about it, I think the main point is a different one. If I do have a project list, I can look at my projects (i.e. my defined outcomes) and make a judgment about the next step to approach that project outcome. If I don't have the project outcome written down, I need to keep the project outcome in my head, which makes it harder to relate to objectively and to review efficiently, in turn making my prioritization more difficult and the system less likely to help me get things done on a higher level than just churning through next actions.

              This thread also contains some relevant comments: http://www.davidco.com/forum/showthr...-list-purposes

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Solyanov2011 View Post
                I just mentioned I don't need project list. That was because most of my projects didn't need any reminder. They were self obvious. For example, I have a goal to train my sales staff. I know that my technical presales is capable to do that. I don't need any project reminder to finish that because it's just one-two steps away: call the presales regarding the training and then wait when it's done. On the other hand some of the projects need to be reminded of. And those projects always require a project plan. Doe example, all of our sales activities require planning.

                I think that a criteria of a project that needs to land on a project list is a project plan. If it requires a project plan then it should be on the project list. If not then it's not needed.
                Hi Solyanov2011,

                Interesting perspective you bring to the table. GTD is infamous for working to our individual needs and areas of focus, so it's always good to hear what appeals to every individual. One thing I will offer is that I personally feel like the key phrase that gets me excited about GTD is 'stress-free productivity' and I find that this is accomplished first and foremost by getting things out of my mind completely. So even if there is a project that is obvious to me, the amount of head space I can clear by putting it down on paper has an amazing ripple effect that I would never have recognized without this methodology. Just a little food for thought.

                Keep up the good work.

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