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  • Delegating

    One thing we don't talk much about is delegalting, but this a huge factor in self management and efficiency. Any best practices? Money can be a big constraint here.

  • #2
    tell me more...

    Originally posted by ero213 View Post
    One thing we don't talk much about is delegalting, but this a huge factor in self management and efficiency. Any best practices? Money can be a big constraint here.
    Are you thinking in terms of someone working in a corporate environment, or are you looking at small business owners, or one-person operations? Do you also want to know how you do this in your personal life, too (like hiring a housekeeper or a gardener)?

    Thanks! Good question!

    Dena

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    • #3
      Shyness can be a huge problem in delegating.

      Originally posted by ero213 View Post
      One thing we don't talk much about is delegalting, but this a huge factor in self management and efficiency. Any best practices? Money can be a big constraint here.
      Shyness can be a huge problem in delegating. Many people don't delegate because they do not want interact with others because of shyness.

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      • #4
        In the GTD book DA has delegating by email as the preferred method, but at my work a lot of people are suffering 'death by emails' so they are encouraging people to talk to people first, then follow up with an email to document the agreed actions.

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        • #5
          Final confirmation of the agreement... on the printed copy of the e-mail!

          Originally posted by Suelin23 View Post
          In the GTD book DA has delegating by email as the preferred method, but at my work a lot of people are suffering 'death by emails' so they are encouraging people to talk to people first, then follow up with an email to document the agreed actions.
          Strange recommendation! They should also encourage people to go to the recipient of the e-mail after sending it to check if it arrived and obtain final confirmation of the agreement... on the printed copy of the e-mail!

          I do not suggest that we shouldn't talk but - as David Allen twittered:

          Originally posted by @gdtguy (2012-01-19)
          Meetings handled well reduce email. Email handled well reduces meetings.

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          • #6
            Delegate when money arrives

            Originally posted by ero213 View Post
            Any best practices? Money can be a big constraint here.
            I am a small business owner with unpredictable cash flow. I have a small file box near my desk in which I store projects that a temp can do (assembly of packets, addressing envelopes I send out once per quarter). Once the money truck arrives at my door step, I call the temp agency and the temp has 4 hours of work (what I can afford at time) to do. Nothing urgent goes in this box. Nothing time sensitive goes in this box. Some two minute tasks go here, like calling a junk mail company and asking them to remove me from the list.
            I also have a "Do you need a temp?" check list. I have some standard questions like "Do you have 5-10 packets?" This way if I have a big mailing to do after the money truck comes, I can justify the four hours with the other projects or tasks on this list.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Suelin23 View Post
              In the GTD book DA has delegating by email as the preferred method, but at my work a lot of people are suffering 'death by emails' so they are encouraging people to talk to people first, then follow up with an email to document the agreed actions.
              Talking in person has advantages: People are more intensely aware of information they've heard in person. Taking the time to talk tells the recipient that the stuff is actually important to you; tone of voice and body language also convey this. They feel more appreciated.

              Talking in person can be more efficient. Email is not a good way to negotiate. Even using email to establish a time and place to meet has difficulties: the last person to send an email can't know that it's been received, so there's no natural moment for assuming both people have committed to a specific proposed time. Talking in person allows for instant communication and and nuances, and may result in a mutual agreement that's different from what either individual would have proposed before the discussion.

              For example: In person, you ask someone to do something and they say "OK. That will take me about 2 days of work." and then you might say "Wait a minute: I didn't realize it would take that much of your time." A discussion might result in a clarification or change in the assignment.

              By email, you send the assignment and the person thinks, "Should I reply that it will take me 2 days? Once I reply that, should I wait for them to confirm before I actually start? What if they don't reply back for several days? Would sending such an email make it seem as if I'm reluctant to do the work? Maybe I'd better just do it and not send an email." Much more complicated than just a quick reply within an in-person conversation.

              Email also has advantages: it's a good way to convey and store complex information, and can be read quickly and forwarded to others.

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