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  • What do you do during the weekend?

    What do you usually do during the weekend?

    How does your day go?

  • #2
    Swimming, walking, running...

    Originally posted by Mishina View Post
    What do you usually do during the weekend?
    Swimming, walking, running, mowing, windsurfing, reading (now Steven Pressfield's "Turning Pro"), writing, sometimes shopping.

    Comment


    • #3
      No different from weekday

      Originally posted by Mishina View Post
      What do you usually do during the weekend?

      How does your day go?
      Basically no different from weekday except I have the farm store to deal with and farm tours to give. And any farm emergencies.

      Yesterday was typical:
      up 5:30 am out to check sheep, set up fences and move ewes and lambs to new grazing, move water, clean, feed & water the dinner chickens, feed & water laying hens, feed my string of horses. Done by 7am so in for breakfast & coffee. Then process e-mails and on-line orders, read forums and read the news on-line. Check sheep. Then moved fences and got stuff set so hubby could mow the fields where sheep were to reset the grass growth. Check sheep. Lunch. Check sheep. Then spend some time on my on-going fiber studio reorganization, farm tours and store sales as people arrived and departed. Check sheep. About 3 hours scanning old glass plate negatives for the local Historical Society. Emergency run up to help the neighbors get 200 cattle out of the hay fields. Early evening chores. Cook & eat dinner. Late evening chores, put chickens away for night, final check of all sheep and that the irrigation will be ok for the night. In, watch a bit of TV while spinning some blended fiber for weaving yarn. Read on my kindle for a bit on my current books (Writing a novel in Scrivener & The Hacker Crackdown) then ready for bed.

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      • #4
        I have a weekend checklist that I follow in no particular order, that covers both days. Things include meal planning, food shopping, cleaning, calling family, gardening, etc. I also have a few fun things on my checklist like going for a bike ride, sitting in the sun reading a book.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Mishina View Post
          What do you usually do during the weekend?
          I read about what Oogie is doing. Then, about 10 minutes later, when her day has worn me out, I head back to bed to recover.



          (Love you, oogie!)

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          • #6
            Oogie is really cool. I though that weekend is for having rest: sleeping, eating, doing what you love. Nope.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Mishina View Post
              I though that weekend is for having rest: sleeping, eating, doing what you love. Nope.
              Well other that the *********cows in the hay, that was pretty much sleeping, eating and doing what I love.

              Comment


              • #8
                You mean you don't ....

                Originally posted by Suelin23 View Post
                I have a weekend checklist that I follow in no particular order, that covers both days. Things include meal planning, food shopping, cleaning, calling family, gardening, etc. I also have a few fun things on my checklist like going for a bike ride, sitting in the sun reading a book.
                ... go to the football??

                Comment


                • #9
                  Go swimmin or picnic under the shade of a tree....Or just chillin out in the yard with some friends...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    amazing

                    Originally posted by Oogiem View Post
                    Yesterday was typical:
                    up 5:30 am out to check sheep, set up fences and move ewes and lambs to new grazing, move water, clean, feed & water the dinner chickens, feed & water laying hens, feed my string of horses. Done by 7am so in for breakfast & coffee. Then process e-mails and on-line orders, read forums and read the news on-line. Check sheep. Then moved fences and got stuff set so hubby could mow the fields where sheep were to reset the grass growth. Check sheep. Lunch. Check sheep. Then spend some time on my on-going fiber studio reorganization, farm tours and store sales as people arrived and departed. Check sheep. About 3 hours scanning old glass plate negatives for the local Historical Society. Emergency run up to help the neighbors get 200 cattle out of the hay fields. Early evening chores. Cook & eat dinner. Late evening chores, put chickens away for night, final check of all sheep and that the irrigation will be ok for the night. In, watch a bit of TV while spinning some blended fiber for weaving yarn. Read on my kindle for a bit on my current books (Writing a novel in Scrivener & The Hacker Crackdown) then ready for bed.
                    Thatīs amazing!

                    Itīs a long time that I wanted to ask:
                    Oogiem, where do you find the ENERGY for doing all this - and also making constantly valuable contribution to this forum?
                    As I remember, you have a lot of current projects and you donīt seem overwhelmed by it...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Tom.9 View Post
                      Itīs a long time that I wanted to ask:
                      Oogiem, where do you find the ENERGY for doing all this - and also making constantly valuable contribution to this forum?
                      As I remember, you have a lot of current projects and you donīt seem overwhelmed by it...
                      Eat well with lots of grass finished meats and local veges and fruits and as low a carb as I can manage and still enjoy the neighbors wine and beer , lots of sleep (we do not use an alarm clock at all, go to bed when tired, get up when we wake up, usually just before dawn, whenever that is) I typically manage 8-9 hours sleep a night. I use the forums here and other ones where I am active as a break between my other tasks. Like now, I've been watching some videos for an on-line class I am taking, need to take a mind break so am here reading what's new.

                      I do get overwhelmed on occasion, usually when I am feeling sick or if we've had some major issue that discombobulated the entire day or week schedule. But in my job/life you have to keep track of hundreds of separate things so I guess I've just gotten used to it.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Oogiem View Post
                        But in my job/life you have to keep track of hundreds of separate things so I guess I've just gotten used to it.
                        Was that "getting used to" before or after you learned GTD ?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Tom.9 View Post
                          Was that "getting used to" before or after you learned GTD ?
                          Before GTD I used Daytime plus Covey and always felt behind and out of control. Never felt I was either doing enough or sure I was doing the right stuff. Always frustrated that I needed to work harder but not getting anywhere.

                          After GTD I am still often behind ( the number of jobs on a farm is infinite) but I also know that I did the best possible things during the limited waking hours and that the things not done are not going to blow up on me. I know I work hard, enjoy life, and that sometimes sheep just happens. I am far more at peace with my huge number of possible and future things to do.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            @admins: I donīt know if this better goes to a new thread...

                            Originally posted by Oogiem View Post
                            After GTD I am still often behind ( the number of jobs on a farm is infinite) but I also know that I did the best possible things during the limited waking hours and that the things not done are not going to blow up on me. I know I work hard, enjoy life, and that sometimes sheep just happens. I am far more at peace with my huge number of possible and future things to do.
                            To reach that peace,
                            - do you check all NA against the 5 horizons of focus?
                            - do you have time-limits on doing stuff which canīt be finished in one run ?
                            (i.e. you clean up only for 1 hour even if it would be finished after 2 hours?)
                            - what about backlog ?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Tom.9 View Post
                              To reach that peace,
                              - do you check all NA against the 5 horizons of focus?
                              - do you have time-limits on doing stuff which canīt be finished in one run ?
                              (i.e. you clean up only for 1 hour even if it would be finished after 2 hours?)
                              - what about backlog ?
                              I came at GTD top down. I have a well defined purpose/mission statement for my life and that is reflected in every area of focus and project I have both in my active and someday/maybe lists. So in a sense yes, all my scheduled actions are aligned with my higher levels. That was easy for me to do. I think something about the realities of nature's pace mean that farming, by definition, gives you a bit of a longer view of your work than many other types of jobs.

                              I sometimes set time limits but usually the deciding factor is energy levels or the pressure from pre-defined work that is time dependent. I can decide to work all day on a project but I still have to do the evening chores for the animals, fix dinner etc. Sometimes I set alarms on my phone to get me to work on a task for X many minutes or hours then I am free to move on. That's for jobs I am avoiding.

                              One bad habit is if I know that I can't finish a task in one sitting my tendency is to leave all the materials and stuff to work on it out. My thinking is I'll get more done if I am not spending time getting ready and putting away. However that clutters up my spaces so it becomes harder and harder to work on anything as all the in process tasks and materials are all over. My tactic now is I am slowly figuring out ways to make project boxes or other containers that I can dump the materials for in process work in when I am done and neatly store them away until next time. I've implemented that first for my WIP knitting projects and it's working great so I'm expanding that method to a lot of other projects.

                              Backlog is still a bit of a problem. When we inherited the farm we had a backlog that spanned many buildings. I'm slowly crunching through that backlog. Most of the outdoors physical backlog is now handled. The garage has the last remaining bits and one barn. The inside paper, photos and digital files backlog is still quite large but I am making progress.

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