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Why don't we do what we know is good for us?

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  • Why don't we do what we know is good for us?

    Hi everybody, have apply GTD for about 2 years.

    The method is great. It makes life simpler. Anyway, my current problem is I just don't do my NA. It's not that the outcome is not what I want. I don't know why, but am I not motivate to do it?

    For example. Doing Yaga for 30 mins a day, 3 times a week will improve my health. But when I see this NA(Yoga for 30 mins) in my @home.. I skipped and do other thing (such as reading book, talking, etc).

    Any suggestion?

    Sugarglider Palm
    p.s. Also read the thread about ThinkTQ, sound like it could help??

  • #2
    Get a real clear focus on how bad you feel when you skip yoga. Really focus on it. Memorise it. Immerse yourself in it. Wallow in self recrimination, regret, and self loathing.

    Now, the next time you consider skipping yoga, it will be easy to remember how bad you felt the last time you skipped it.

    Dave

    Comment


    • #3
      Maybe that was a little drastic.

      What I meant was: a day looks completely different at the start and the end. At the start of the day, speaking for myself, I wonder how I can guarantee some happiness. This type of thinking will steer me towards things I really like doing (in your case this is reading, talking to friends).

      But at the end of the day my thought patterns can revolve around guilt and regret, “why did I read instead of doing my yoga?”

      If you can think like it’s evening when it is still morning, you will anticipate and intercept these regrets by doing the things that you might otherwise have skipped doing.

      It’s kind of planning your moods – ask yourself in the morning “Come this evening, what things would I most like to have accomplished today?”

      Call it regret management.

      Dave

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      • #4
        I just started working out again -- no excuses. I get more energy that way even though you have to exert some energy initially to get motivated. Now I just can't stop.

        Comment


        • #5
          LOL I just got home from work early and am going to do yoga before dinner.

          Let me ask you--why do you do yoga? Do you notice a difference in the way you feel (more relaxed, peaceful, etc)? If not, you are just doing it because of some perceived long term benefit. That kind of motivation is VERY difficult to sustain (I know, I'm a doc and also do "wellness consulting"). Do you attend any yoga class? Keeping up a home practice without it is difficult.

          If you have noticed differences after doing yoga then focus on them...remember how good it feels afterwards. If not, then the next few times you do yoga notice how you feel before and afterwards. Focusing on the positive might be more effective then the opposite.

          OK my 2 minutes is long up and it is time for my yoga.

          Scott

          Oh and things you need to do are different. Find Mark Forster's (sp) web site and read the article called something like "I'll just get the folder out"

          Comment


          • #6
            Many times I will list an almost ridiculously small next action on my NA list and this is just big enough for the rest of the project to hide behind so that I don't focus on the overall picture (like spending a whole, entire 30-minutes exercising).

            As an example of this, I think that even David Allen himself said somewhere that he adds next actions of "put on exercise clothes". He may not have the energy to exercise, but he does have the energy to put on the exercise clothes. After he gets the clothes on he can always renegotiate the agreement with himself, but he usually feels like working out once he gets dressed for it. This may work for you and is a fantastic example of what an actual next action should be.

            We each have to find our own proper size for a next action. For me it is very small but for others you may be able to include bigger next actions and not get overwhelmed with them. You may want to try a next action like "put on yoga clothes" or "roll out yoga mat" or whatever works for you. [Can you tell that I don't yoga? ]

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            • #7
              Thank you every body

              Thank you every body, I will try the methods you given me as see what is best for me. : >

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Why don't we do what we know is good for us?

                Anyway, my current problem is I just don't do my NA.
                The Important Things

                Last week a client asked how they could more accurately prioritize their work "ahead of time." After a short conversation, I understood she wanted to have a very short list that would stay current through the day, "no matter what interruptions" showed up.


                In order to work on "the most important thing," I specifically address three topics:

                • Energy
                  Attention
                  Intention


                Priotization takes place moment to moment. At ten thirty on Tuesday my attention might be on one of dozens of things. My energy may be low because I traveled all day on Monday. My intention could be to work that thing I "think" I should complete.

                In the seminar GTD seminar [ http://www.davidco.com/pdfs/gtd_inhouse.pdf ] participants practice a proven methodolgy to identify, define and capture all the things they have attention on (eg: their priorities). When this inventory is complete - it usually takes 1-3 days to get it ALL - it's much easier to manage the flow of work via your energy and intentions.

                Create your entire list of open loops, next actions, and projects and next Tuesday at 10:30 pick the one next action that:

                You have attention on; and
                You have energy to work on; and
                You have an intention to complete.

                Comment


                • #9
                  In terms of yoga, I suggest the President's Challenge to you..

                  has been helpful to me to get an "instant payoff" .. even if it is a red star.


                  http://www.presidentschallenge.org/

                  In terms of generic motivation to get stuff done .. I've found Stuart Lichtman's work very helpful .. here's a link to his free minicourse on Cybernetic Transposition ... you can ignore the "hype" about money .. it's really a goal-achieving methodology which works on any goal.

                  http://www.anything-fast.com/success/?fid=brochureguru

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    About 21:40 last night, I come back here to get the advice. Someone advice me to visit http://www.presidentschallenge.org/ . This is very amazing. When I go there and go through the the register process, you know what happen? Yes, I just go up stair, rollout my yoga mat and begin exercise. After complete it, I go back to the site and update my first log. Very amazing!!!

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                    • #11
                      That is obviously a get-rich-quick, wishful thinking, magical thinking, overhyped, absurd, extreme unverified anecdotal testimony scamola of the first degree.
                      Also, his "Quaternary theory" of the human brain is "unique". I wonder if he will get the Nobel Prize for neuroscience?

                      At least this guy understands fragile human nature, human weakness and fallibility, and the desire for something for nothing, that induces people to buy countless billions in lottery tickets.

                      That guy wants YOUR money, so he can "make easy money through internet viral marketing".


                      Originally posted by guest

                      In terms of generic motivation to get stuff done .. I've found Stuart Lichtman's work very helpful .. here's a link to his free minicourse on Cybernetic Transposition ... you can ignore the "hype" about money .. it's really a goal-achieving methodology which works on any goal.

                      http://www.anything-fast.com/success/?fid=brochureguru
                      Last edited by CosmoGTD; 03-31-2006, 05:42 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Coz

                        Stop sitting on the fence … what do you REALLY think of Lichtman?

                        Dave

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                        • #13
                          The best thing to do is to think about what in the course of, say, a month you want to be the most proud of -- and there lies your answer!

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                          • #14
                            I think i am going to steal his advertising slogans..

                            "Wanted: People Who Need Money FAST!"
                            "How To Get Lots of Money For Anything FAST!"

                            Who DOESN'T need money fast?

                            Sign up for that one, and you could get spammed into oblivion.

                            There is a sucker born every minute.

                            Only In America.



                            Originally posted by Busydave
                            Coz

                            Stop sitting on the fence … what do you REALLY think of Lichtman?

                            Dave
                            Last edited by CosmoGTD; 03-31-2006, 05:43 AM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Maybe you just don't like doing yoga. Maybe it's boring. Maybe you can get the benefits of yoga doing something else that feels better, is more fun, or ties in with another task - such as dancing, weeding, housecleaning, etc.

                              I agree that doing something just because it MIGHT improve your life over the very long term is not very motivating. You need to tie it in with something more gratifying over the short term.

                              I don't do anything on a regular basis that I don't either enjoy over the short term OR derive obvious benefit from over the fairly short term. There are too many things that "might" or were "supposed to" make my life better over the long term that I spent months doing and not seeing much or any benefit from. So I dropped those activities.

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