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  • Coulda, Woulda, Shoulda

    One pattern I have figured out is that when I have a next action statement that contains could or should that it doesn't normally get done.

    Example:
    I should follow up with Jim on XYZ project.
    I could e-mail Amy about that missing invoice.

    If I frame it more emphatically, then it is more likely to get done.

    Example:
    Follow up with Jim on XYZ project
    E-mail Amy about missing invoice

    I suppose this is because with the latter I have made a committment to take action. But it is the could/would/should statements that I think of at odd moments during the day.

  • #2
    Wording

    Part of it may be that your first two examples are statements, while your second two examples are commands. Reading the second two on an action list might be more motivating to action because of the way they are worded.

    Another part may be that the differences in wording are reflecting your a priori feelings about the situations. The last two show a commitment to action whereas the first two show some ambivalence. It wouldn't be surprising then that the last two got done while the first two didn't.

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    • #3
      Coulda, Woulda, Shoulda



      If I frame it more emphatically, then it is more likely to get done.

      Example:
      Follow up with Jim on XYZ project
      E-mail Amy about missing invoice
      Fascinating, I'm reading a book right now, and this post made me think of something I saw in the last chapter.

      If I focus on exactly what I want, and then "let" it happen, chances of success run higher. Although the author was describing the way one can learn to play tennis, I've been applying this idea for the past week or so. I'm getting a really clear picture in my mind (in the above case: How happy Jim is going to be that I followed up, and how motivated I'll be to move on once I've followed up). Then, I write down that next action, and "let" it happen.

      Pretty cool...


      http://p218.ezboard.com/flivinglifef...opicID=5.topic

      Comment


      • #4
        Scott & Jason, Thanks so much for your comments. It really did clarify this for me. I feel like this is the kind of thing I should have figured out a few weeks into GTD, not a few years in. But I really think this is the beauty of David's ideas, when you are overwhelmed and stressed you don't see a pattern at all because you don't have the time. The fact that I, a self-acknowledged avoider of above runway thinking, am considering this at all is a step forward. I like the "let it happen" process, and plan to watch this over the next few weeks. Appreciate it!

        Comment


        • #5
          Jason,

          Tim Gallweys insights are deceptively powerful...the less you try the better you do, almost Zen like. I read the Inner Game of Golf while learning in my teens and had some unbelievable "whoah where did that come from?" moments on the golf course in the following weeks. It was a fascinating experience. More recently I read the Inner Game of Work, but have to admit that did not have such a profound effect on me!

          Philip

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