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  • #31
    I took a bunch of Davidco podcasts with me on a 12-hour roundtrip the weekend before last (I'm a poor student who can't get Connect, so I gobble up free podcasts in batches and then never, ever delete them), and two were David and Kelly and the CTO whose name I can never remember...Robert? talking about the ideal list manager.

    One podcast was them discussing the various merits, and then there was no real resolution (because as I'm sure David knows, the moment he says, "Use this product" GTDers will flock to it in droves, whether it's actually the right product for them or not). And then it sounds like there was some listener backlash/reply that there was no "answer." So there was a second podcast, more of the same. Except, at the end, David said, "You know, the thing is, if you asked me what is the very best, most foolproof list manager? A loose-leaf notebook. Everything is there, you know how to use it" etc.

    When I introduce someone to GTD, I always suggest paper to get going. The last thing they need is to learn a new tool along with the thought process. It really also helps underscore the notion that the thought process is independent of the tool...they've used a plain notebook before, so it obviously must be the way they're thinking about it that makes this notebook work differently than some other notebook. And the times I've seriously fallen off the GTD wagon, I always begin again with a paper list manager for at least a while. There's something very concrete about paper that takes the focus off the tool.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by jesig View Post
      I took a bunch of Davidco podcasts with me on a 12-hour roundtrip the weekend before last (I'm a poor student who can't get Connect, so I gobble up free podcasts in batches and then never, ever delete them), and two were David and Kelly and the CTO whose name I can never remember...Robert? talking about the ideal list manager.

      One podcast was them discussing the various merits, and then there was no real resolution (because as I'm sure David knows, the moment he says, "Use this product" GTDers will flock to it in droves, whether it's actually the right product for them or not). And then it sounds like there was some listener backlash/reply that there was no "answer." So there was a second podcast, more of the same. Except, at the end, David said, "You know, the thing is, if you asked me what is the very best, most foolproof list manager? A loose-leaf notebook. Everything is there, you know how to use it" etc.

      When I introduce someone to GTD, I always suggest paper to get going. The last thing they need is to learn a new tool along with the thought process. It really also helps underscore the notion that the thought process is independent of the tool...they've used a plain notebook before, so it obviously must be the way they're thinking about it that makes this notebook work differently than some other notebook. And the times I've seriously fallen off the GTD wagon, I always begin again with a paper list manager for at least a while. There's something very concrete about paper that takes the focus off the tool.
      Your post is inspiring. You seem to have a clear understanding of GTD. I applaud you!
      Yes, it was Robert Peake on that podcast with us.

      Can you email me your current address? I'd like to send you David's Ready For Anything book on CD as our gift. I think it would be a wonderful addition to your audio library (and my personal fave!)

      Kelly

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      • #33
        Add another one to the paper train....

        I am really happy to find this thread today! I have tried to implement GTD many times over the past 10 years and in the past year have been mostly successful. Still many many gaps. Read a massive ebook on Omnifocus (you know the one) and the MacSparky videos. Loved them! Attended a DA seminar and really think I am getting it.

        So here's the thing....I LOVE computers. I changed careers to work with computers. I have gone 99% paperless in my home, become a ninja in Omnifocus & Evernote, and would be embarrassed to mention the number of Apple devices I own. I have automated my workflow on the Mac using Hazel, Text-Expander and Applescript.

        And yet......my lists repel me. Except for one that I keep in my paper notebook, carried with me to a part-time state job that does not allow personal devices on-the-clock or access to cloud-based services. Guess where I've been most efficient...?!

        And one other thing- I have been a rock-star with the tickler system- and-you guessed it- in a paper-based 43-folder setup! It makes me very happy and I love opening it up to discover a reminder or inspirational quote each day. So- I am thinking the universe is trying to tell me something.

        Paper GTD it shall be!

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        • #34
          I use paper more than the electronic gadgets because it's more convenient for me.

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          • #35
            It is interesting how this debate continues ..... and how like me all of us seem to move back and forth ...

            I've also lost count of the number of apps I have, the scripts I've written in Outlook not to mention the number of different size / style notebooks, filofaxes, folders etc I have collected over the years ...

            However something on one of these forums clicked with my last year that suggested:

            Digital for anything historic or future, and
            Analog for anything current ....


            I have adopted this and it seems to work for me in that I now have:

            Digital via Outlook;

            Calendar
            Archive filing
            Evernote
            Generic task list (I have a quick function that files an email that requires next action but flags it, marks as unread so I can retrieve it on iPad and Outlook task list - I then categorise and use TaskTask on the iPad)
            I also have a script in Outlook that takes any email that starts with the @T. and converts it direct into a task and deletes from inbox ... this allows me to quickly drop tasks on to my task list with a quick email.


            Analog;

            The thing I've struggled with is meeting notes .... some people still struggle to realise you're taking notes when typing versus distracted on something else .... plus always challenging to take notes and read documents on the same device single screen ...

            So I tend to use iPad for the meeting pack and take notes on an A6 postitnote pad in a nice leather holder that I now have with me all the time. I then process the notes later in the day taking any actions.


            ....

            The only deviation currently from this is I am trying an iPad app called 'Less Meeting' which allows you to capture notes and actions ... but importantly syncs those actions directly with reminders on iPad meaning it gets straight back on to my task list in Outlook with no intervention.

            This works quite well and I now vary between the two dependent on meeting .... usually group meetings done via iPad and 1:1 on paper.

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            • #36
              I think the problem with digital is it's basically infinate!

              The amount of times i've set up a system in Toddledo, Filemaker database, Dropbox folder system, Evernote, Outlook, Mindmanager, etc, etc, etc then jumped ship is shameful! With paper what is in your hand is what you have to work on, nothing can get 'lost' as you know it's in there somewhere and you just have to write a contents system to find important stuff. Backup is easy - just take photos of pages you have important stuff of - sync them to Evernote or what ever should you need them, quick and simple. Bottom line is it's all about doing, if you remove the 'glamore' from you notes and concentrate on the content you will get more done in less time.

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              • #37
                On the money!

                Originally posted by Foxman View Post
                I think the problem with digital is it's basically infinate!

                The amount of times i've set up a system in Toddledo, Filemaker database, Dropbox folder system, Evernote, Outlook, Mindmanager, etc, etc, etc then jumped ship is shameful! With paper what is in your hand is what you have to work on, nothing can get 'lost' as you know it's in there somewhere and you just have to write a contents system to find important stuff. Backup is easy - just take photos of pages you have important stuff of - sync them to Evernote or what ever should you need them, quick and simple. Bottom line is it's all about doing, if you remove the 'glamore' from you notes and concentrate on the content you will get more done in less time.
                Can I get an "Amen!?!?!!" Yes, you are right on the money. This is why I keep coming back to paper. Ok... paper and Evernote.

                Nicely put.

                Dena

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