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The Pomodoro Technique

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  • The Pomodoro Technique

    I use GTD for Collecting, Processing, Organizing and Review pretty stringently. When it comes to doing, I use GTD guidance to select my pre-defined work for the day. Once that selection is made, I transfer those tasks to a a pomodoro technique work sheet for planning my day around pre-defined work. The pomodoro technique also allows for urgent and unplanned work and allows for extra time to do processing and organizing during the day. Anyone see anything inherently wrong with this? I find the two systems to be quite compatible.

  • #2
    No, you're good, the gtd police will not be visiting you.

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    • #3
      I've found gtd and pomodoro to be a pretty perfect marriage. I've practiced GTD for 8 years now, and pomodoro for about 1. It works especially well since a lot of my NAs tend to be of the "write the introduction to article" variety, where there's really no smaller NA to break it into. The pomodoro technique helps with the "put your butt in the chair" aspect of those sort of NAs.

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      • #4
        Pomodoro Technique is in my toolbox as well

        Ditto, I'm a die-hard GTDer, and I also use the pomodoro technique when I need to crank through some pre-defined work time.

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        • #5
          Procrastination

          I use this technique often. It's particularly helpful if I'm procrastinating. Once I get started on something and do a couple of pomodoros, I'm likely to keep going. At least it ends the head trash I might give myself putting something off--again.

          Glad to have it in my toolbox!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Barb View Post
            Once I get started on something and do a couple of pomodoros, I'm likely to keep going.
            Shouldn't there be some Bloody Mary-derivative drink called a Pomodoro? Now... think about that and re-read your sentence...



            Dena

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Barb View Post
              Once I get started on something and do a couple of pomodoros, I'm likely to keep going.
              I have the same problem: I tell myself just a few lines, and before you know it.. I've read the whole book.

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              • #8
                Ha Ha!

                Originally posted by artsinaction View Post
                Shouldn't there be some Bloody Mary-derivative drink called a Pomodoro? Now... think about that and re-read your sentence...



                Dena
                You know, Dena? There probably IS a Pomodoro bloody mary mix out there somewhere! Then I could do exactly two pomodoros before falling flat on my face! (cheap date)

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by mcogilvie View Post
                  I have the same problem: I tell myself just a few lines, and before you know it.. I've read the whole book.
                  Beautiful!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by artsinaction View Post
                    Shouldn't there be some Bloody Mary-derivative drink called a Pomodoro?
                    There's succo di pomodoro; I heard it cures migraines ...
                    http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bloody_Mary
                    http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pomodoro

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                    • #11
                      Indeed, and in addition

                      When I read up on the Pomodoro technique,I saw that I was doing it by accident well an aspect of the technique. The aspect of the technique: planning, tracking, recording, processing and visualizing are some things which I have not done and I did read somewhere that visualizing all of the steps before starting helps one get threw any blocks that hinders one from moving forward.

                      Nevertheless, I do like the breaks aspect of the pomodoro techniques and I use the breaks section to alternate between "work" and "personal" as personal next tasks being done in the five minute break.

                      But that just some of my thoughts

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                      • #12
                        Now Habit + Pomodoro + GTD

                        I thought I would also add, I've found Pomodoro to mesh really nicely with Neil Fiore's THE NOW HABIT methods as well. It is the very essence of "consistent starting," and since a pomorodo with break is 30 minutes, it works very nicely in Fiore's unschedule.

                        I use GTD methodology to define my work, and pomodoro to accomplish the work I've defined. I've found it to be an almost seamless combination.

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                        • #13
                          You're good.....but....

                          I too am a die-hard GTD'r who uses Pomodoro (about 6 months now) to keep me focused when i'm actually in one spot for long enough to. I use a timer called "It's Focus Time" app, because it (as opposed to many of the other sim. apps) has a clicking timer sound if i want it. I read somewhere that this helps and it seems to.
                          The question i have always had about using Pom, is the effect that it could have on the state of "flow". Flow is the state where you are fully engaged in what you are doing, and time doesnt matter, and you love it. Like when you are writting something or painting or whatever, and after several hours you go, "wow! it's 2:30am...what just happened?" The goal is to increase the time in flow. If I feel like i am "in flow" then my Pomodoro timer going off is a bit of a "flow buster". I usually just reset it and keep going without the 5 min. break. I know that Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, the psycologist that came up with the concept of flow, is a major GTD's himself as is his staff, but never heard what he thought of Pomodoro as it relates to flow. Interested in other's perspectives on this.

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                          • #14
                            yes, that's exactly what I do. If I'm happy to keep going I just reset the timer. I often find after the first pomodoro, my mind settles down to getting the work done

                            Ruth

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                            • #15
                              This is the first time I heard of the pomodoro technique and it sounds really interesting.

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