Forum

  • If you are new to these Forums, please take a moment to register using the fields above.
Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Segregating work and personal systems Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Since I work online, my employer shares the work related documents in Dropbox. This will allow me to easily access the files even if I'm using another computer. Personal files are kept in our desktop.

    Comment


    • #17
      GTD on Flashdrive

      When I was in your situation, I had my entire GTD System (Outlook + Excel lists + Digital Support Files) on a flash drive. The main part of the system (calendar, project list, NA list, etc.) was in Outlook and I had the Outlook PST file on the flash drive. I could open the PST file in Outlook on my employers computer in the morning, use and keep the system up to date for work all day, have the system available for personal things if needed (including personal email), and then take it home again on the flash drive. No copying/transferring -- the whole system was always up to date on the flash drive.

      Important Note -- the flash drive was encrypted with a password
      Another Important Note -- I backed up the flash drive at reasonable intervals

      I did this for Outlook. I would think you could do this for whatever you are using. And of course, you can use this for support files.


      Tom

      Comment


      • #18
        Processing your personal stuff on your work computer...

        Originally posted by TomW View Post
        When I was in your situation, I had my entire GTD System (Outlook + Excel lists + Digital Support Files) on a flash drive. The main part of the system (calendar, project list, NA list, etc.) was in Outlook and I had the Outlook PST file on the flash drive. I could open the PST file in Outlook on my employers computer in the morning, use and keep the system up to date for work all day, have the system available for personal things if needed (including personal email), and then take it home again on the flash drive. No copying/transferring -- the whole system was always up to date on the flash drive.
        1. There are work environments where you are not allowed to use your personal flash drives.
        2. Processing your personal stuff on your work computer may violate your company's Security Policy.
        3. Processing your personal stuff on your work computer may be treated as an additional taxable non-cash fringe benefit.
        4. Processing your personal stuff on your work computer leaves traces.

        Comment


        • #19
          separate work and home, both using simple text editors

          [QUOTE=ellobogrande;105383] The best GTD system is the simplest one. QUOTE]

          Agreed!

          For a few years I used a single system on my work computer using Outlook Tasks.

          Currently, I have separated my work system from my home system. Both systems use simple editors (I am using Word, but any editor will do). I really like it -- editors are easy to search, easy to cut and paste, easy to enter and edit, easy to sort and prioritize. Currently, my work system has three projects: my goals for this quarter. My non-work system has all the other stuff. At work, because there are so few projects, I have a single file with both projects and tasks. At home, I have separate files for projects, for tasks, and for completions (once it is done, I don't want it taking up space in my current files anymore -- but I don't want to just delete it eitiher)

          I thoroughly agree -- simple is good!

          Regards,
          Rob

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by ellobogrande View Post
            A system with the ability to link actions and projects and reference materials together is far more cool than it is useful. The best GTD system is the simplest one. ... If you're ok with just managing reminders of your outcomes and actions then you can consolidate your reminders into one system (preferred).
            Well said, ellobogrande.

            On my work system, I often have commands set up so that I can just type the name of the project (essentially), and it will take me to a file with all the main links needed for that project. Or I store these links in cross-referenced computer files and/or an easily searchable wiki, etc. So in my next actions list I usually just need to mention the project or action.

            On the other hand, I often also write the directory (path) or the command
            on the next action because
            I feel more motivated if I actually see it rather than just being 99% sure I can
            find it within a few seconds.

            Comment

            Working...
            X