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  • #16
    I weirdly almost envy people just starting out with GTD, as although I found it tine consuming in the beginning, to get my head around and to try out varying approaches to implementation - the first few "wins" for me made such a positive impact on my sebse of control and organisation, I wish I could go back and have that high again. ( okay I know this sounds evangelistic but It isn't really, because you have to stay in control of what you want out of it and tweak it to meet your needs all the way along - if you are the master of GTD rather than the servant then you will see the benefits too.)

    I started with the book and with notebooks and after three years my expenditure gas been little more than this. It will be a different journey for each person it for me the immediate wins were around dealing with "stuff" and increasing productivity around next actions; propelling projects forward at work. But it took longer for me to really engage the vision, purpose and areas of focus to work and this is what I am making progress on now and that feels really good. It's a big system which can feel extremly complex and extremeky simplistic at varying times in tge learning process but then life can often feel the sane to me - it's this synergy that tells me GTD has merit.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by mark1968 View Post
      Currently, I'm using a tiny bit of GTD methodology, mixed with DWM rules, and Omnifocus.
      Thanks a lot, mark1968, for the link to DWM! It also led me to Mark Forster's Auto-focus and Final Version methods, and John Perry's Structured Procrastination. Wow! Empowering techniques. I plan to incorporate elements of some of them into my systems (er, when I get around to it).

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      • #18
        Originally posted by cwoodgold View Post
        Thanks a lot, mark1968, for the link to DWM! It also led me to Mark Forster's Auto-focus and Final Version methods, and John Perry's Structured Procrastination. Wow! Empowering techniques. I plan to incorporate elements of some of them into my systems (er, when I get around to it).
        You're welcome. There's a lot of gems on that site.

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        • #19
          Make things as simple as possible, but not simpler.

          Originally posted by cwoodgold View Post
          Thanks a lot, mark1968, for the link to DWM! It also led me to Mark Forster's Auto-focus and Final Version methods, and John Perry's Structured Procrastination. Wow! Empowering techniques.
          I tried to understand what Mark Foster had wanted to achieve with his systems and found out that his intention was to break one of the fundamental rules cited often by David Allen:

          "Make things as simple as possible, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein

          (it is a simpified paraphrase of the actual quote "It can scarcely be denied that the supreme goal of all theory is to make the irreducible basic elements as simple and as few as possible without having to surrender the adequate representation of a single datum of experience.")

          Mark Foster's systems rely on constant browsing one long todo list containing all your commitments.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by TesTeq View Post
            I tried to understand what Mark Foster had wanted to achieve with his systems and found out that his intention was to break one of the fundamental rules cited often by David Allen
            Both are men, human and fallible. I don't fret about what they say, or if I'm breaking protocol, I only care if the rules/tools work.

            Anyway, these types of debates, imho, are silly. Try something, see if it works. If it doesn't, find something that does.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by mark1968 View Post
              Try something, see if it works. If it doesn't, find something that does.
              I'm trying a version of autofocus today, with a closed list and an open one, and it's going nicely.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by cwoodgold View Post
                I'm trying a version of autofocus today, with a closed list and an open one, and it's going nicely.
                I think basically any list-based system will work from the gathering stage through the initial glow of successful actions. The question is what to do when the glow sputters out. (I am familiar with Foster's search for a great list traversal algorithm.)

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                • #23
                  Processing step of the Workflow!

                  Originally posted by mark1968 View Post
                  Anyway, these types of debates, imho, are silly. Try something, see if it works. If it doesn't, find something that does.
                  From the individual perspective it may be silly. But from the conceptual perspective GTD has one huge advantage - the Processing step of the Workflow. You can have many unclarified items on the Autofocus lists. For some people it may work because they have natural ability of converting problem into action. But there are many people that must learn it.

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                  • #24
                    Capturing ideas

                    I read through this post David Allen's Universalism and I think this person totally misses the point of GTD. For me GTD is about capturing all my ideas, big and small. Buy toilet paper is a small widget-like task, but it is still important. Since I have a place to put all of my ideas, I find I have more time to focus on the "deep work" this person claims is lacking from following GTD. Since I have a trusted system, I can forget about buying toilet paper and focus all of my attention on the hard problems. Just as an example, there was one time there was a nasty bug causing random crashes in our software. For over a week several people tried to find the cause and failed. They finally asked me because even though I knew nothing about this particular code, I'm good at debugging. I set aside my next action lists and spent 8 hours working on this one bug and I finally figured it out. I don't know if GTD was the reason, but I knew I could put everything else on hold because I had a trusted system to go back to the next day and pickup where I left off.

                    You also don't know when you will a eureka moment. Sometimes I'm in bed reading a fiction book and a solution to a problem that has eluded me just hits me like a bolt of lightening. I put my book down and pickup my iPhone to capture this idea, then and there. Without a trusted system, these ideas can get lost. I can also pickup my book and finish my pleasure reading knowing the idea is safely captured.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by gnugrep View Post
                      I read through this post David Allen's Universalism and I think this person totally misses the point of GTD. For me GTD is about capturing all my ideas, big and small.
                      I find Cal Newport superficial and a bit hard to take. How seriously can you take someone who has written a how-to book on being a superstar in high school? But GTD is more than capture. That's just the first step.

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