Forum

  • If you are new to these Forums, please take a moment to register using the fields above.
Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Using GTD within my Personal and Professional Life Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Using GTD within my Personal and Professional Life

    Hi Everyone,

    Great to be part of this community of GTD users. A quick overview but I have only recently started implementing the tools of GTD but already the biggest takeaway for me is realising the amount of junk in my head that was playing havoc on my internal RAM.

    My initial questions stem from few roadblocks I am encountering using GTD transitioning from the initial set up of my system at home and setting up my projects, context lists, someday/maybe and next actions (most of these have found their way onto context lists such as At Home, At Office etc.). I have recently used the GTS tools as part of beginning a new job. I have a few concerns.

    Summarising these as best I can:

    * I have spent my first few days of this job slowing down and analysing each item I learn and trying to break it into a project or series of next actions. This feels good. The problem I see is this has used approximately over half of my time thus far and I see it as a cycle which will continue - I used GTD to be clear of all the tasks I need to undertake but feel hesitant to get stuck in. Like an endless loop.

    * How do you capture your new open loops whilst working on an active task. My mind seems to funciton in the way I will think of 5 new items per hour. It feels like I need to break my concentration simply to capture these and make a decision about where to put them.

    * A common theme I see from other posters is confusing projects and next actions. I feel like I am either too broad on a next action and describe it at a high level (eg. Read x specification or analyse x piece of software) or feel the need to capture a series of actions which than confuse the point of what I need to do next. This triggers a sense of confusion and helplessness.

    * Bear in mind I am coming up to my first weekly review. Perhaps this will alleviate my concerns.

    I hope I have been clear enough with my questions. Looking forward to your replies.

    Sean.

  • #2
    Separate capture and process

    * How do you capture your new open loops whilst working on an active task. My mind seems to funciton in the way I will think of 5 new items per hour. It feels like I need to break my concentration simply to capture these and make a decision about where to put them.
    Just grabbing this one. You need only capture when you have the idea. Just write it down on a piece of scrap paper and throw it in your inbox. Or type an email to yourself. Or call your voicemail. Or keep a journal called INBOX and write your ideas there.

    As you're doing something else, you just write enough to capture the idea along with any details you think you need to fully understand that thought you had.

    Processing is a separate step. You may have set times you process or you may process after each completed task but you don't want to stop what you're working on to figure out where to put those 5 ideas you just had. Write them down and keep on working.

    Unless of course one of those ideas was "That's the fire alarm; I should get up and go outside." And if it is, take your little notebook with you so you can capture while you're standing outside.

    Comment


    • #3
      I agree...

      ... with SiobhanBR.

      Every meeting I have I draw a line down the right hand side of a page and anytime a thought hits me like "Call Cat re: Plans" or "Get an update from Temp Team" <-- actual items from last meeting, I just stick them in that column. And trust me, it's just a scrawl... I'm then back to the meeting.

      It's generally the same at my desk, though I have my iPad in front of me with Omnifocus open, but again, I don't fill in all the detials, it's just a quick entry and back to work. A notepad like SiobhanBR suggests is also a good idea.

      David's first step is "collect"... do that and process later

      I do get what you mean about the new job role though. Tyring to go slow enough to capture everything, learn a new job, culture, colleagues etc but at a pace that doesn't end up in overwhelm is a fine balance.

      I'm sure the weekly review will put all this in context ... good luck

      Comment

      Working...
      X