Forum

  • If you are new to these Forums, please take a moment to register using the fields above.
Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
New book: Focus by Daniel Goleman Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • New book: Focus by Daniel Goleman

    Was just going through the reviews of a new book by Daniel Goleman.. FOCUS: The Hidden Driver of Excellence

    Seems like there's a lot of material in it that would strike a chord with GTDers..

    Like this one, for example:

    "The dividing line between fruitless rumination and productive reflection lies in whether or not we come up with some tentative solution or insight and then can let those distressing thoughts go—or if, on the other hand, we just keep obsessing over the same loop of worry."

    chords(if they haven't struck you already..!): open loops, trusted system, outcomes, next actions..

  • #2
    One Reality - Many Books

    Originally posted by nshram View Post
    chords(if they haven't struck you already..!): open loops, trusted system, outcomes, next actions..
    Sounds good. I understand, though, if your are just checking out the reviews so far.

    It is always hard to find the books that really give YOU some new useful insight for YOU. Most good books contain lots of more or less valid descriptions of reality and of the potential merits of various types of acting and thinking, and we all have gaps in our understanding, but it is hard to know in advance whether a given book will bring YOU anything that fills YOUR gaps.

    None of it (usually) is entirely new knowledge, objectively speaking. But each book (usually) represents a unique selection of "old truths" presented in a "new way" (terminology; level of detail; sequence etc). And this can be all that it takes to get an "old truth" to become a "new truth" (that connects some important dots) for a given individual. Very hard to predict, though.

    Comment


    • #3
      You've put it beautifully..
      Every new book does contain stuff that's already been said before..
      But.. the book becomes great/famous/best seller if it presents it's content in an unique, new and novel way..
      Maybe it's a question of language.. i've observed that an "old truth" in a new book suddenly resonates with me because of the way the author has presented it..
      I've made a small study of the similarities between Alan Lakein's "How to get control of your time and your life" with the 1st GTD book.. maybe a future post..!

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by nshram View Post
        .. i've observed that an "old truth" in a new book suddenly resonates with me because of the way the author has presented it..
        Absolutely. That's how it works for everyone, I think. The difficulty is knowing in advance which of a myriad books will resonate with YOU. On the one hand, you don't want to miss anything that would be useful to you (perhaps something you had hitherto overlooked). On the other hand, you don't want to have the same well-known observations reiterated over and over just because some other readers found it to be useful or "new" (to them).

        But a good book is not only about new truths, I must say. It can also have value (and novelty) in the way it reiterates and emphasizes and brings focus to some particularly relevant set of old truths that have never been presented as an integral set of truths before. You might say, since we are in the GTD forum, that GTD is an example of such successful "revamping" or "crystallization" of proven intuitive insights that had never (to my knowledge) been compiled, attuned and described as a comprehensive "set of truths" before. That's what makes it so valuable - and powerful.

        I might just check out Goleman's book

        Comment


        • #5
          Speaking of Good Books ...

          Another good book, with only an indirect connection with GTD. is Daniel Kahnemann's Thinking Fast and Slow. I read it a few months ago after having picked it up almost by accident at an airport bookshop with a very limited selection. I did not expect much, but it proved to be one of the best books (for me, that is) that I have read in a very long time.

          It also deals with something very old and almost obvious, but from a fresh and neutral angle and with lots of factual support. I think we have all probably experienced the inner conflict between "heart" and "mind" sometimes - where our emotions or intuition drives us in one direction and our analytical or logical component drives us in another.

          This conflict has "always" been recognized - it is and age-old conflict, and many of the common descriptions are simply ludicrous. For example, I was particularly disappointed by the intelligent writer Mark Forster's term "the lizard brain" (for the intuitive part) and the adjoining description of it as "slothful, reactive" etc. That's not my view at all - how can people even get such an idea! And in religions (in most creeds, probably) there is the same denigration of the "flesh" as opposed to the noble "spirit".

          What Kahnemann puts forward is a simple model for how the mind (brain) can be described as if it were two interacting systems (nothing new so far - that's how they all describe it) where one of these represents the more "automatic" and the other the more "reflective" thinking (nothing new there either). What he does, that is new - at least I have never read it in a book before, but normal people often seem to be aware of it - is that none of these two "systems" is perfect. Your reflective self makes errors that the automatic self would never do, and vice versa. They both have their strengths and weaknesses, and most of the book is dedicated to establishing a number of types of mistakes, biases and delusions, where either system tends to trump or mislead the other, and demonstrating these cases with experimentally proven results. He's a professional psychologist, Nobel prize winner in Economics; with lots of "data" to support his case.

          The connection with GTD is not very direct at all - mainly that even in task management you need to use both your reflective skills and your intuitive skills, for example how to organize and label your stuff versus how to make the final pick of tasks to do.

          Comment


          • #6
            Never said before?

            Originally posted by nshram View Post
            You've put it beautifully..
            Every new book does contain stuff that's already been said before..
            I've heard about some books that contain stuff that has never been said before...

            Comment


            • #7
              Folke

              Speaking of Good Books ...
              Another good book, with only an indirect connection with GTD..
              In the last couple of years there's been several books with related content.. some with links to GTD..

              Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg
              Willpower Instinct by Kelly McGonigal
              Mindset by Carol Dweck
              Sway by Brafman and Brafman
              Mistakes were made by Carol Tavris
              Willpower by Baumeister and Tierney (GTD is extensively referred to in this book..)

              Seems like "thar's gold in them thar minds.."

              Comment


              • #8
                Now I know who to blame!

                Originally posted by nshram View Post
                Mistakes were made by Carol Tavris
                Now I know who to blame!

                (I couldn't resist...)

                Comment


                • #9
                  ..but not by me!

                  the full title was "..but not by me"!

                  Originally posted by TesTeq View Post
                  Now I know who to blame!

                  (I couldn't resist...)

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X