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  • Let me know which tags you are using

    I noticed that there are a lot of tasks that I would only consider doing on the weekend and so I made a tag for it so during the week I have those tasks filtered out of my daily search and then on the weekend I can easily pull up a list of "honey dos". Hope that helps someone else out there.

    Would like to hear some more suggestions of tags that you guys use.

  • #2
    Originally posted by jakenava View Post
    Would like to hear some more suggestions of tags that you guys use.
    I don't use tags. I use contexts in Omnifocus. But assuming you mean what contexts you have I have them for outside with help, inside with help, outside by myself, Main barn, Red barn, Little House, Main House, Back cedars pasture, Front Pear orchard, Apple orchard, for each software package I use regularly, for the local town, for the bigger city we go to once a month and so on.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by jakenava View Post
      I noticed that there are a lot of tasks that I would only consider doing on the weekend and so I made a tag for it so during the week I have those tasks filtered out of my daily search and then on the weekend I can easily pull up a list of "honey dos". Hope that helps someone else out there.

      Would like to hear some more suggestions of tags that you guys use.
      My experience is that tags on next actions just add a layer of potential confusion, clutter and extra work. Depending on the app, I have used tags in the past to implement contexts and priorities, but that's a different thing entirely. If I needed a weekend context, I would have one.

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      • #4
        Attachment

        Here's my tag list from Things for Mac.

        My tags mostly consist of physical locations like cities/stores/areas and a few software apps I use for work.

        I do find tags very useful in Things with these 2 use cases:

        1. During a Weekly Review, reviewing Next Actions by tag. This helps me narrow my focus as I browse a long list.

        2. At a location. When I have to go to Home Depot for something, I'll look at Things Next Actions and filter by @HomeDepot remembering that I also need x, y and z while I'm there.
        Attached Files

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        • #5
          Few contexts

          If we ignore the terminology for a bit - some apps have a feature called "contexts", others have "tags", others have "labels", others have "categories" etc etc, and some apps have several of these with different technical capabilities - I think there are two main types of potential use for these "contextual properties".

          1) One purpose is grouping the next actions into separate lists and/or into list sections in order to make them easy to overview. For this purpose I personally prefer to have only a few contexts defined, mutually exclusive - only one context per task; the most "scarce" one only. I use these five:

          @Person - this action requires real-time interaction with a person (phone, meeting, chat etc)
          @Out - this action requires me to be in some temporary location (shop, others' office etc)
          @Reflection - this action requires a good thinking environment (mental calm, enough time, not tired etc)
          @Base - this action requires me to be physically at my Home/Office
          @Device - this action requires me to use a computer, tablet, phone or other particular tool

          The listing order above is far from random. If an action requires more than one of those contexts I select the highest one. Specific people are usually the hardest resource to have access to, whereas computers etc are usually the easiest (maybe almost anywhere), so if an action requires me to sit with a person and look at a computer I will assign that action an @Person context.

          The @Reflection context provides me with a convenient (perhaps a bit "dirty") means to flag tasks for reprocessing or special review if I think the task is not clear enough as it stands. For example, if I am not sure yet whether it is best to instruct Jim by phone (@Person; real-time dialogue) or to email or voicemail him (@Device; one-way monologue) I assign it a @Reflection context to begin with.

          I like it short and sweet like that, because the fewer contexts there are, the fewer buckets I will have to look into. I can often make the final task selection ocularly straight from the list.

          2) Another purpose for using "contextual properties" is to be able to quickly narrow down the list to find more exactly the best matching tasks for a given situation right now. In order to do this you have to be able to apply all the contextual requirements, e.g. @Person and @Out and @Devices (or even more detailed. e.g. @JimX, @Bridge, @CameraB, @Sunshine, @Afternoon) and have the filtering capability to make use of this. You seldom have that kind of filtering capability conveniently available in an app. So, realistically, and what I do half-systematically only, is I keep a few non-exclusive additional tags for very frequent contacts and apply those in addition to the main context. I also tag tasks that are particularly large, scary or otherwise revolting that I may want to tackle when I am in the mood for a heavy challenge or may want to see it looming on the horizon during my reviews.

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