Forum

  • If you are new to these Forums, please take a moment to register using the fields above.
Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
lists without a PDA or computer Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • lists without a PDA or computer

    I know I am needing more lists in my life. Checklists can be the linkpin of GTD. But where do these lists go?

    I am going to use paper. My computer is a desk top and I don't really need the expense of a PDA nor the learning curve experience at this time.

    So lets assume I have a list (which I am actually building after my complete fiasco this morning of trying to find my password for this site!) of my passwords. I am imagining that when I am done with it today, I will PUT IT IN MY A-Z GENERAL REFERENCE FILES? Under....??? Well there in lies my constant confusion:

    Do I put it into L for lists in a folder called lists of passwords. OR in P for passwords. It can be put in both places, I suppose, but if I start doing that, I will need a new cabinet. I could also associate it with my computer since in fact that is the only time I use passwords is on-line.

    OR...and this is my instinct: just put it in a folder I have in my tickler file for things I reference quite frequently in a week, like phone numbers, client addresses, and a map of time zones, as well as a catalog of my product-line.

    But other lists will not be so clear cut.

    Any insights?

    Mckennaa

  • #2
    Option: go with YOUR gut. Where would be the first place you would reach for?

    Of course if it is passwords that should be 'for eyes only' or money (bank account) etc it would be best to place them in a secure fashion (like electronic?!?) or coded in some fashion.

    Comment


    • #3
      Hi my friend,

      I have been using for the last 8 years a rock-solid paper system.

      I use a D-style 3-ring binder with colored tabs and inserts. I am using the following categories :

      1) Agenda
      2) Actions (GTD)
      3) Projects (GTD)
      4) Work (anything work or office related)
      5) Finances (broker statements, stock market ideas etc.)
      6) Notes (plain paper, essentially this is my inbox)
      7) Reference (everything else)

      Unless you really want something portable, I would stick to a generic binder with categories something along those lines. Just maintain your lists with a word processor and print the pages out when they are fresh and updated!


      Bebert

      Comment


      • #4
        Hm...three ring binder! I used a similar system for all my payables and receivables for quite some time...Had even consider retrofitting some of my current filing and am so glad to hear from someone that there are other sized "boxes" to think outside of within GTD. However, I am also concerned - I really need to stay simple and consistent.

        For a few years, I used day-timer products with some pretty fair success, but really I just feel so good about the GTD ideals and David's approaches in general that I am trying to get as close to his models as possible. And to stay simple, but not too simple.

        So with Bebert's reference to word processors...

        This brings up another area of concern. I am self-employed and my business is essentially manufacturing and distribution (I am a professional craftsperson). I am also the director or department head for all my marketing, graphics, financial tracking, billing, and the web designer for two web sites and web master for all three sites related to my business. I am also the designer, and hands-on producer of the work, as well as the sales rep. Tip of the iceberg really; there are many other jobs I perform as I am a one-person business. So I have a lot of hats on throughout a work week. If my "filing system" on my computer is in indication of my "artist" brain at work, I will be amazed if I can ever GTD!

        I think that I tend to over-catagorize - thinking I am pinning an item down with lots of folders inside folders. And therefore, I have quite a hard time finding files. Sometimes, I just keep making copies so that they will be anywhere I might look. But that is not a system than can be taken out of cyberspace. And frankly my files are really cluttered at this point, too.

        And keeping track of sales inquiries vs active accounts can even be a challange. I use and like Access, but for a long time everything went into one database, active, inactive, inquiries, leads I wanted to follow up on and well....I finally have a different data base for each catagory. But that encourages me to do more catagorical styled filing! Which has great pitfalls all around. Where did I finally put abc.doc and what was it named and....well, this is a constant issue for me.

        Lately, I am saving many files to my desktop as result of my inefficiency. And yes...now it is taking quite a while to look around my desktop for files! Or worse, I forget that I put "new marketing plan outline.doc" on my desktop and end up doing a file search when I can't locate the doc in:

        C:\mydocuments\mybiz\marketing\currentprojects\hol idayplan\marketing outlines

        or whatever...!!! LOL - I seem immune to all things simple!

        Thanks for letting me ramble a bit. I am facing my busiest time of the year in a year in which I am monthly breaking sales records thanks to a successful marketing campaign last year. Now I am feeling ill-equiped. Just trying to GTD and get some organization established while I still have some time I can devote. And yes...I have hired a part-time person for my studio...but...with tight margins in my competative field, I need to work smarter and keep costs as low as possible.
        Mckenna

        Comment


        • #5
          Use pointers to lists.

          If you do not know where to place the password list (in (L)ists, (P)asswords or (C)omputer folder) put it in - for example - (C)omputer folder and put pointers to this folder in other folders (in other words put "Passwords list is in Computer folder" note in (L)ists and (P)asswords folders).
          TesTeq

          Comment


          • #6
            Checklists

            kenna,

            My binder just has a separate section for checklists. I found myself referring to some of them so often that it just made sense to keep them in the binder in their own section.

            Comment


            • #7
              It sounds like your idea to keep the checklists with your tickler file is a good one. You can just stick them into a folder labeled "Checklists." If the folder gets too thick to be useful, then you might want to consider dividing your lists into separate folders. I keep two extra folders with my tickler system - receipts to process and data entry. I keep my checklists on my Palm.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: lists without a PDA or computer

                Originally posted by kenna
                Do I put it into L for lists in a folder called lists of passwords. OR in P for passwords. It can be put in both places, I suppose, but if I start doing that, I will need a new cabinet. I could also associate it with my computer since in fact that is the only time I use passwords is on-line.

                Mckennaa
                One of the simplest things I've ever done is to use an old A-Z address book/pages for an index. It really only takes a couple of seconds to add the info in, whenever you file something you are not sure of.

                For example, you have your list of passwords. I would put it in P for passwords, then turn to the P page and write passwords. Then turn to the L page and write List of passwords, see P you might also put it under C for computer.. C: "Computer passwords, see P"

                So it doesn't matter where you think about it two weeks from now, you can go to L or C or P and know where to find it.

                I started doing this a long time ago ( on my rolodex ) for things like Plumbers. I would never remember the name of the outfit, so I filed the card under the alphabetical name, and then stuck a rolodex card under P and wrote Plumbers, Staar A/C is expensive, don't use Starrrrr Plumbing, neighbor recommended stttarr mechanicals.

                Yes, I had little notes on the cards too. It beat having to go back thru 8 months of cancelled checks to find the people I used last time!

                Elena

                Comment


                • #9
                  There is an article by David Allen on how to set up a loose-leaf binder for GTD. It is no longer on his website but is archived here:

                  http://tinyurl.com/4d78k

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    What great suggestions these all are...

                    I think I am most drawn to Elana's tip and getting back to a binder system would be a "natural" thing to incorporate as well. Thanks for the link to David's hints.

                    Thanks!

                    I feel a deeper link to success with this thread and all of the help you each have offered.

                    Mckenna

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      There is another advantage to using a paper-system. You can set up your tickler file in it. Set it up exactly as described in GTD but use index- sheets instead of folders. Buy a good hole punch.
                      m

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: lists without a PDA or computer

                        Originally posted by kenna
                        So lets assume I have a list (which I am actually building after my complete fiasco this morning of trying to find my password for this site!) of my passwords. I am imagining that when I am done with it today, I will PUT IT IN MY A-Z GENERAL REFERENCE FILES? Under....??? Well there in lies my constant confusion:

                        Do I put it into L for lists in a folder called lists of passwords. OR in P for passwords. It can be put in both places, I suppose, but if I start doing that, I will need a new cabinet. I could also associate it with my computer since in fact that is the only time I use passwords is on-line.
                        Why not forget trying to record/recall your passwords for sites like this altogether?

                        Have a look at http://www.angel.net/~nic/passwdlet.html - it has saved me *a lot* of time!
                        --
                        Kev

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X