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Baroque Music Snippet on "GTD Fast" CD??

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  • #16
    Originally posted by flexiblefine
    I think the original poster was asking about the music David uses as his example of "Weekly Review" music, not the music used as fillers and wrappers in parts of the program.

    David's music definitely had harpsichord in it, but I don't have a clue what piece of music that is.

    Constant, did you have any luck getting your guru to identify it?
    flexiblefine, I'm still working on it. It's a project!

    Back to the parts of the general discussion on music at 60 beats, I read (can't recall source) that this approximates our heartbeat and that the steady pace of Baroque music helps us get into a groove that optimises learning or doing work that needs focussed thought.

    I know Superlearning technique even uses breathing at a steady pace where you break up data to be learned into four second invervals then voice record them to a tape recorder. Following their method you breathe in for four seconds, hold your breath as you listen to a four second data bite, then breath out for four seconds. Something like that. I'm sure their (Superlearning) website explains the whole process much better. The rythmic breathing and background barogue largos put you into the perfect brain state receptive to learning. Or something like that. Hope my source on this wasn't the National Enquirer.

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    • #17
      60 beats per minute is actually a pretty slow heart rate, on the order of a very fit person's resting heart rate. It seems to me more likely to be typical of sleep than of focused concentration. 60 beats per minute is also a very slow musical tempo, much slower than most of the Baroque music in my collection.

      While rhythmic breathing is common in many meditation practices, four second breaths strike me as more likely to induce oxygen deprivation than learning. Try it and see how long you can keep it up. And I'll bet doing it takes your heart rate significantly above 60 beats per minute, too.

      So yeah, I'm a bit skeptical.

      Katherine

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      • #18
        Originally posted by kewms
        60 beats per minute is actually a pretty slow heart rate, on the order of a very fit person's resting heart rate. It seems to me more likely to be typical of sleep than of focused concentration. 60 beats per minute is also a very slow musical tempo, much slower than most of the Baroque music in my collection.

        While rhythmic breathing is common in many meditation practices, four second breaths strike me as more likely to induce oxygen deprivation than learning. Try it and see how long you can keep it up. And I'll bet doing it takes your heart rate significantly above 60 beats per minute, too.

        So yeah, I'm a bit skeptical.

        Katherine
        Unless you are Lance Armstrong with a heart rate of 35 BPM. I bet he sleeps with socks on. But he probably gets alot done!

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        • #19
          Originally posted by kewms
          60 beats per minute is actually a pretty slow heart rate, on the order of a very fit person's resting heart rate. It seems to me more likely to be typical of sleep than of focused concentration. 60 beats per minute is also a very slow musical tempo, much slower than most of the Baroque music in my collection.

          While rhythmic breathing is common in many meditation practices, four second breaths strike me as more likely to induce oxygen deprivation than learning. Try it and see how long you can keep it up. And I'll bet doing it takes your heart rate significantly above 60 beats per minute, too.

          So yeah, I'm a bit skeptical.

          Katherine

          Katherine, I should clarify on info from my previous post. The four second Superlearning technique is not four second breaths, rather 3 consecutive four second breathing actions(so really, 4x3=12 second breaths):
          1. Inhale for four seconds
          2.Hold breath for four seconds and while doing so listen to your taped voice of information you are trying to learn
          3.Exhale for four seconds

          Repeat above for an individual learning session of approx. 20 minutes. Collect Nobel Prize.
          Hope that clarifies.

          You need to make a tape using the second hand of your watch or listening to the clicks of a music metronome set at 60 bpm to create the 4 blank seconds of tape, followed by 4 seconds of your voice recorded info(info like key points from a text you're studying for ex.), followed by 4 blank seconds and so on.

          I bet making the tape is 80% of the learning experience.

          This stuff comes out of the Superlearning Book (one author, Sheila Ostrander)
          Probably easy to find in a library.

          Also, to clarify on 60 bpm Baroque music - should have emphasized the slower "largo" sections of Baroque pieces are what the fuss is about in this, not the piece in it's entirety.

          Again with disclaimer that there is probably a lot more on this stuff than the above. Agreed on skepticism. For me, it's just intellectual curiousity. Already I'm over my head.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Constant
            Katherine, I should clarify on info from my previous post. The four second Superlearning technique is not four second breaths, rather 3 consecutive four second breathing actions(so really, 4x3=12 second breaths):
            1. Inhale for four seconds
            2.Hold breath for four seconds and while doing so listen to your taped voice of information you are trying to learn
            3.Exhale for four seconds
            Yes. I understood that. That's artifically fast breathing for me. YMMV.

            Originally posted by Constant
            I bet making the tape is 80% of the learning experience.
            I'll bet you're right. 10% more is self-motivation: you are especially diligent because you don't want to feel the effort of making the tape was wasted.

            Katherine

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            • #21
              Baroque Music on "Fast" CD's?

              I am reviewing the CDs again, and once more interested in the classical piece that is repeated on the CD's. Has anyone figured this out yet....

              Gordon

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              • #22
                I'm still sticking to Bach's Brandenburg Concerto # 3, but my feet aren't set in stone. (Many pieces sound very differently, depending upon who is playing and where). I can understand why others disagree, partly because we don't hear quite enough of it on the FAST CD.

                If we ever get a definitive answer I hope it will be posted on this string.

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                • #23
                  Bump Up...!

                  Perhaps I should clarify... I was interested in knowing the light classical piece they play in the transitions on the GTD Fast CD's. Not the piece David uses for illustration (I have it).

                  Thanks for any help....
                  Gordon

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                  • #24
                    Confused?

                    Now I'm a little confused .. do you have/know the Baroque piece David uses during his weekly review? What is it?

                    (It's great how a post from so long ago can gain a new life on he forum)

                    Wm

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                    • #25
                      GTDFast Music

                      Originally posted by BigStory View Post
                      Perhaps I should clarify... I was interested in knowing the light classical piece they play in the transitions on the GTD Fast CD's. Not the piece David uses for illustration (I have it).

                      Thanks for any help....
                      Gordon
                      We did research this question, but unfortunately were unable to determine the answer. Thank you for your interest!
                      Best wishes,
                      Sarah

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Recorder concertos

                        There was a suggestion earlier in this thread: "Concertos for Recorder - Telemann & Vivaldi". How many concerti you'll have to sort through, I have no idea.

                        So, for the Weekly Review example: BigStory, can you tell the rest of us what the piece is?

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                        • #27
                          Brandenburg Concerto #3

                          I am quite sure it is this piece. Here is a version from YouTube played at a quicker tempo than the piece on the GTD Fast CD's.

                          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xq2WT...eature=related

                          For those of you "just tuning in", David mentioned that he likes Baroque music, and that he has a special piece that he uses for his Weekly Review. In the seminar recorded on the GTD Fast CD set, he plays a clip of it for the audience. (There is also very nice piece of music played as a segue between sections of the lecture, which is what I was particularly looking for.

                          Best Wishes,
                          Gordon
                          Last edited by BigStory; 05-16-2008, 10:36 PM.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by andersons View Post
                            Digital format and playlists are the way to go! I have "Energizing" and "Relaxing" playlists.
                            A year ago before GTD, I'd say that's incredibly "nerdy or dorky", but my only reaction upon hearing it just now was AWESOME Idea! Why didn't I think of a differently classical musical energy-level playlist mix. Good one!

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by BigStory View Post
                              I am quite sure it is this piece. Here is a version from YouTube played at a quicker tempo than the piece on the GTD Fast CD's.

                              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xq2WT...eature=related
                              After listening to that, I too am quite sure that's the piece. My classical music collection is all later stuff, so I should definitely go Bach-hunting. Thank you!

                              I don't know if anyone at Nightingale-Conant could tell you what the other transitional/bumper music is.

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