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  • When you Start to GTD...

    I know is just me, is a general thing in GTD... When you start to GTD you start missing something... This is so big, that David Allen & CO create another Seminar that I am planning to take this year.

    I love GTD, and I think finally I am getting to that point of GTD and feeling that emptiness, and I decided to write in here and ask what to do.

    I know what I need to get that feeling out, and is get in chaos again, (somebody sometime ago write about that) but how I get over this feeling and continue to my productivity level.

    I consider myself a Green Belt changing to Brown, but I have this feeling... I need Focus and Leverage...

    In the time being can somebody explain to me how to get rid of this feeling in the productive way, how I get myself in the super-productive highway, I am ready to left this side road.

    thanks a lot

  • #2
    Apinaud...I'm not sure how you mean. It sounds a bit familiar...are you feeling a bit "tweaked out"?

    Comment


    • #3
      Apinaud: Stress is addictive.

      If we aren't under stress some of us have a vague feeling that we are being unproductive. In a sense that is true, because the desire to do better and accomplish more carries with it a certain type of "productive" stress. On the other hand, if we are simply creating unnecessary stress in our lives in order to "feel" productive, then we run the risk of becoming less productive, more frustrated, and disorganized. There is always a temptation to regress to a state of chaos and busy-ness because that is a familiar place for many of us.

      For me, the objective is not to eliminate stress but to have total confidence that the stress I am dealing with is channeled in a positive direction and toward realistic goals. (I haven't yet reached that point, but I'm making progress).

      Finally, in an attempt to answer your question I suggest that you turn your focus on what is actually happening in your work/life and not rely so much on how you "feel" at any given moment. Feelings can be very deceptive and can hold us hostage to all sorts of unrealities.

      Comment


      • #4
        First of all thanks for the responses. Let me explain a little more that I am feeling and were I am in this moment…

        I have been discovering that every once in a while I got out of control, not too much original, except that I discover that is every time I am getting better at GTD. I remember when I change from White to Green Belt in GTD I got out of control big time, and the same is happening now.

        In some ways I got better and the stress start disappearing and I freaked out, I am addicted to stress. I am not sure if there is something like Productive Stress, I just want to be able to do more; but without any doubt the brain sometimes create this stress feeling and uncontrolled feeling for him to feel productive and powerful when he regain the control.

        After a lot of thinking I have been founding that I am getting out of control every time I need to toss the rock a little further; in better words, if we assume that be Black Belt is like be at the top of the mountain, every time I reach some level (in this case I identify myself with the Belts of GTD) and I need to change from rope (in the Past from White to green; now from green to brown) I think there is not a rope to the top, but a series of ropes that we need to use, every time we change the rope, the new rope is different and therefore I got scared.

        The reason I wrote originally here was because as well as I knew that I have highs and Lows in my GTD and life, I was trying to find out how the people is doing when they got to those Highs in GTD to avoid go Down or too low and be able to jump higher every time, to be a little more high next time you go up and less low when you go down.

        In many cases my challenge with GTD is that, is keep me in the high before my big procrastination syndrome takes place and send me down…

        I know I am not the only one who has trouble going up and down in the GTD, and I am sure there is a lot of people who has ‘maybe’ found a way to identify when they need to toss the rock further to continue walking…

        I will this treat to continue alive, I am sure I am not the only one, but I am creating a new list for those moments when…. I am feeling out of control or (maybe and) those moments I need to toss the rock a little further.

        Comment


        • #5
          "I have been discovering that every once in a while I got out of control, not too much original, except that I discover that is every time I am getting better at GTD. I remember when I change from White to Green Belt in GTD I got out of control big time, and the same is happening now."

          I have a theory on this. This is going to be pretty simplified since everything that actually happens is too complicated for me to write down.

          I am a musician and one thing that I have noticed over the years is that there are times when I am increasingly frustrated with my performance level. Usually, this is right before I experience an increase in ability. What I think is happening is that I actually improve mentally prior to physical changes taking place. In other words, I start having ideas, hearing things, etc. before I am actually physically capable of carrying those things out.

          This used to be a huge source of mental anguish for me. However, over the years, I have come to welcome these periods of frustration. They let me know that improvement is really just around the corner. We don't improve unless we step outside our comfort zones first. This can be very uncomfortable.

          Now that I am concentrating on other priorities in my life, I have seen the same processes occur. Whether it is GTD, sales skills, athletics, whatever, the same thing seems to happen.

          Just my very simple way of trying to analyze myself. Take care.

          kbcooley

          Comment


          • #6
            Being chronically disorganized and internally chaotic creates an enormous level of internal pressure (stress), which is relieved by meeting deadlines. The addiction-to-adrenaline theory is absolutely on point, and I think there's a psychic equivalent. It's "addiction to self-created-heroics." If I wait til the 11th hour to write that report and pull it off, not only do I meet my deadline, but I do it under extreme conditions of duress, albeit self-imposed. This has curious consequences:
            1. I arrive at the meeting with a dual sense of triumph, having met the deadline and having done it on no sleep. Of course, I know I can't tell people I pulled an all-nighter in order to complete a relatively routine piece of work, because underneath it all I know it's dysfunctional to work the way I do.
            2. It's unlikely that I was able to finesse and polish the report, so it's rougher than it might be if I'd started on it earlier. That reflects on my professionalism, but privately I feel it's excellent, given the circumstances. Nevermind that I did it all to myself.
            3. Because I'm so focused on avoiding the task for days or weeks, then on beating the clock to get it done, that becomes the project--not the report. I go from one deadline to the next in a state of denial or frenzy, and I never have the chance to step back and examine and evaluate the work I'm actually doing. That's a two-fold examination, for syntax, accuracy, etc. but also for whether doing it relates to my larger objectives. I don't have the time or mental freedom to get that perspective.

            Chaos is great at screening us from the fact that what we're doing may have little real value, to ourselves and/or the business we're supporting by our work. To use a car metaphor, it's a lot easier to spin your wheels in the rut than it is to get out of the vehicle and either push it out or figure out how to give the wheels traction so you can move. That's my convoluted reflection on why a person might create chaos when he was on track with GTD.

            One more thought. GTD is a mechanism and means to an end, but it's the content of what's plugged into the mechanism that makes the difference. You can establish a successful routine of same old/same old with GTD, or you can use it to leverage strength and energy to get on track to get the right things done. If the victory of mastering GTD feels hollow, you may be missing something. FUN, for example. IMO, the most notable characteristic of people who've got GTD nailed is their ability to enjoy every aspect of their lives. If you're GTDing well enough to have real leisure time, adding structured pleasure can help you feel the fullest benefits of the system.

            Just a few thoughts. May be off base, but I figured I'd throw them out anyway.

            Comment


            • #7
              And on more things

              Excellent little analysis above, by arduinna. I must add one more thing. I found one of the big attractions of the "all-nighter," or doing things at the last minute, was that I could comfort myself over 2nd rate work by falling back on the circumstances under which it had been done. "If I got a 'B' doing an all-nighter, imagine what I could have done if had really taken that project seriously." It preserves your ego while allowing you to perform at less than your best.

              It works against you in the end though. For one thing, you don't retain nearly as much of the stuff you put together at the last minute. Also, if you can get away with decent results on last minute work, what motivation is there to get better? But the real kicker is, when you really ARE required to produce excellent work - i.e. you get a job in a place where there are plenty of excellent people who have the discipline you lack - you fall flat on your face! You cannot compete and are running hard just to keep up, while trying to install some new habits. And, you really could have been much better! But to avoid risk and preserve your ego you were unwilling to pay the price. I am sure many of you (along with yours truly) can identify....

              Regards,
              Gordon

              Comment


              • #8
                clearing the decks, and peering down a bottomless void....

                Hi all,

                what an interesting set of posts..... I've been doing GTD just long enough to have done about 20 weekly reviews, and they are certainly very hard work, as well as very rewarding.

                As I've posted elsewhere on these boards, my self-initiation into GTD methodology brought me fairly quickly to the terror that the artist experiences when facing the blank canvas, or the author the blank page.

                What a revelation - that my years of procrastination were functioning to prevent me from actualizing my true potential - a piece of self-sabotage to prevent myself from potentially losing face, if I happened to trip and fall on the way to my peak.

                Now, at least once a week, I become fully accountable to myself, who no longer has the alibi of stress and overwhelm to keep me from reaching for the stars. Now more relaxed and more productive than ever, my desires and my horizons ever expanding, another stake pounded into the rails of the train driven by my true ego and desire function. Accountable solely to myself, and no more reason to point a finger of blame or jealousy at anyone else. Exhilirating humility. Seeing the objective feeling of my life and its direction.

                Clearing away all the noise and clutter from the runway of life, and all that is left is the emptiness of chaos - but remember that chaos is not a negative term, but it means potential, or the field of infinite creativity, when we allow ourselves to interact with it, rather than fear it. Standing between the feeling of being totally OK with everything that is, at the same time as creating what could be, and finding the power and courage within to transform the former into the latter.

                GTD is simply a method, and what it does is clear enough of the noise and distraction away, so that we can finally face our inner self, and come to know what we are truly made of.[/url]

                Comment


                • #9
                  Fear, Eustress and Dystress

                  After a lot of thinking I have been founding that I am getting out of control every time I need to toss the rock a little further; in better words, if we assume that be Black Belt is like be at the top of the mountain, every time I reach some level (in this case I identify myself with the Belts of GTD) and I need to change from rope (in the Past from White to green; now from green to brown) I think there is not a rope to the top, but a series of ropes that we need to use, every time we change the rope, the new rope is different and therefore I got scared.
                  It sounds to me that GTD is taking you to higher levels - you're really making progress.

                  BUT, the idea of reaching a new level produces fear in you.

                  Maybe you're afraid that people will expect more of you, or you of yourself.

                  Maybe you're resisting leaving your comfort zone.

                  Maybe you've climbed the ladder high enough to realize it's leaning against the wrong wall (and you haven't been living in harmony with your unique life purpose).

                  Maybe it's something else you're afraid of.

                  I can't explain in a brief post how to overcome fear, move past resistance, and escape the lure of your comfort zone.

                  However, identifying the problem is often half the battle won.

                  I can say that there is a positive type of stress. It's called Eustress, as opposed to Dystress (negative stress).

                  Eustress is what you feel when your excited, exhilarated, enthusiastic, etc. It's good energy. (and a whole mouthful of 'E' words! )

                  Hope this helps you,

                  Trisha

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'm surprised no one mentioned this, but sometimes you just have to give yourself a break and do something fun and renewing so that you can approach things with new energy and commitment. Apinaud, I seem to recall that you are an earlybird and work pretty long hours. Maybe you need to leave your system behind and go away for a three-day weekend with your sweetie (but bring a little notebook just in case you have some thoughts to collect...). It doesn't have to cost a lot of money or take a lot of time to do something that's fun and relaxing that will renew your spirit.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by jmarkey
                      I'm surprised no one mentioned this, but sometimes you just have to give yourself a break and do something fun and renewing so that you can approach things with new energy and commitment.
                      Yup, pleasure is too important an aspect of GTD to overlook, as I said above....

                      If the victory of mastering GTD feels hollow, you may be missing something. FUN, for example. IMO, the most notable characteristic of people who've got GTD nailed is their ability to enjoy every aspect of their lives. If you're GTDing well enough to have real leisure time, adding structured pleasure can help you feel the fullest benefits of the system.
                      Glad to see the idea makes sense to someone else.

                      Comment

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