Forum

  • If you are new to these Forums, please take a moment to register using the fields above.

Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Long-term goals or "finding your passion"

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Long-term goals or "finding your passion"

    I started implementing GTD a couple of weeks ago and I´ve had a lot of success so far (a few items that had been in my ToDo list for ages have finally been done! ). My problem however is about setting goals. Now that I'm getting things done, what things do I want to do? I read some very good posts on this board about goal setting and have managed to set a couple of short term (20k feet) goals like run a 10k for my birthday or generate more income as a free lance translator (so I don´t have to get a "real" job in an office ) However I'm completely lost at higher altitudes. I have no clue as to what to do with my life two years from now, much less what my "passion" or my "mission" is. I know I have many skills and a couple of college degrees, so that's not the problem. I have tried several things in the past (college professor, marketing manager, language teacher) and pursued many and varied interests (too many to list here), but I never managed to stick with anything for long. Does anyone have any suggestions for finding out? How did you realize what your calling was?

  • #2
    I look at my library. The books I read indicate to me clearly what I want to do with my life. Despite all the various genres of books I read, there is a thread that ties them together. If you can find that thread in your life, it will help you figure out what you really want to do.

    Comment


    • #3
      Looking at the Library

      Originally posted by MarkTAW
      I look at my library. The books I read indicate to me clearly what I want to do with my life. Despite all the various genres of books I read, there is a thread that ties them together. If you can find that thread in your life, it will help you figure out what you really want to do.
      A very good idea. I would add one proviso, however.

      When you look through your library, one thing you will want to do is to tease apart "things that I (would) love to do" from "problems I'm trying to solve." Most people have one or more of what I call "besetting problems." These are problems that arise from the basic conditions of their lives. They remain through long periods of a person's life, and often resist repeated attempts to resolve. However, if for some reason their life changes dramatically, the problem often goes away, and so does their interest in it.

      An example might help illustrate what I mean. A person might be an accountant. If you look at their library, there might be a dozen books on novel writing and well as a dozen books on how to stop procrastinating. The writing books are there because the person has always wanted to write a novel. The procrastination books are there because the person needs to keep plugging away at a job they despise. If they quit their job and become a novelist, their procrastination problem might virtually disappear because they are doing a job they love. If you look at their library two years from now, there might be three dozen books on novel writing, and none on procrastination...because they have all been thrown out.

      One would wonder what their library (and their life) would be like if they had quit their job to become a behavioral psychologist in order to help people overcome procrastination.

      Comment


      • #4
        The Occupational Adventure by Curt Rosengren is a blog dealing with finding your passion at http://curtrosengren.typepad.com/occupationaladventure/
        He has some good suggestions and offers coaching on finding your passion.

        Also see Worthwhile, the magazine and the blog, their tag line is
        Work with Purpose, Passion and Profit. The blog is at
        http://www.worthwhilemag.com/index.php

        Wayne

        Comment


        • #5
          Purpose

          Steve Pavlina has articles on, and blogs on finding your purpose in life (among other topics).
          http://www.stevepavlina.com

          Highly recommended.

          Comment


          • #6
            My Specialty

            Here are some questions I ask my clients to help them identify their Life Purpose:

            Give the following questions some thought and brainstorm ideas as they come to your mind:

            Who are you?

            What do you want your life to stand for?

            What do you really want to do with your life?

            Why?

            What do you love about yourself?

            What makes you feel passionate and alive?

            What would you do if you knew you couldn’t fail?

            What would you regret not having done in your life, when you’re on your deathbed?

            What natural gifts and talents do you have?

            What activities make you lose track of time?

            Why do you do these activities?

            What is most important to you?

            What gives your life meaning?

            What do you want to be?

            What do you want to do?

            What need in society do you want to actively contribute to?

            What is the meaning of your life?

            What is the purpose of your existence?

            For what reason were you put on this planet?


            Choose to have a great day!

            Trisha Cupra, Life Coach

            Comment


            • #7
              And then return to reality...

              Originally posted by CosmoGTD
              Imagine you are financially independent, and really LIVE IT in your imagination.
              Then just brainstorm out all the things that you would do with your life and time.
              Start with fun stuff, or whatever pops into your mind.

              Keep repeating this exercise over and over, and patterns will emerge.

              Coz
              And then return to reality...

              TesTeq

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Looking at the Library

                Originally posted by Scott_L_Lewis

                An example might help illustrate what I mean. A person might be an accountant. If you look at their library, there might be a dozen books on novel writing and well as a dozen books on how to stop procrastinating. The writing books are there because the person has always wanted to write a novel. The procrastination books are there because the person needs to keep plugging away at ...
                Scott,

                I used to think that some of your posts showed evidence of telepathic abilities on your part … but now I ‘m just plain scared. How DID you see into my spare room?!

                Comment


                • #9
                  I think, when you are younger, you tend to be more open-minded about who you want to be, what you want to be doing, where you want to be doing it, etc. The whole "maybe I'll be a doctor, or a musician" thing. It's all an open page.

                  As you get older (finish university, get a job, get into your career, get committments like family) you tend to lose this open view. You start following the grain. Where you are 2 years from now, is directly related to where you are now, and no longer completely independent of the present.

                  Not saying this is bad or good. Just that I used to have big grand plans, and now I'm starting to realize that many won't be realized. Which makes it even more important for me to pick the ones I really want to focus on (because I can't do them all).

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I think it's safe to say that all of us would benefit from work that had the qualities of Flow, as outlined by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi in the book of the same name.

                    We have seen how people describe the common characteristics of optimal experience: a sense that one's skills are adequate to cope with the challenges at hand, in a goal-directed, rule-bound action system that provides clear cues as to how well one is performing. Concentration is so intense that there is no attention left over to think about anything irrelevant, or to worry about problems. Self-consciousness disappears, and the sense of time becomes distorted. An activity that produces such experiences is so gratifying that people are willing to do it for its own sake, with little concern for what they will get out of it, even when it is difficult, or dangerous.
                    I've found that it's not so much what you do, but how you do it, and just as importantly, how you're allowed to do it.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      A great book dealing with abilities, passions and putting it all together is "The Lemming Conspiracy." I wish such a book was available when I was but a lad. But life's about changin....nuthin never stays the same! (Patti Lovelace)
                      MC

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X