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  • new user, hooked

    Bought the book Thursday, 6th October.
    Read it Thursday and Friday.
    Saturday and Sunday I cleaned out my office using GTD. (I'm a freelance writer/editor, working from home. I usually work 8 - 4 with half an hour off for lunch.)
    Monday, 10th Oct., finished work at 3.30 (actually got more done than in my normal 7 1/2 hour day).
    Today, Tuesday, 11th, I've finished work already. It's 1.30.
    If I keep this up, I'll be finsihed my work before I've even started!
    Seriously, have other people experienced this phenomena? Does it wear off? (I hope not!)

  • #2
    Well, that's the first phase. But then it gets better because you get ideas for more fun exciting things to do and you start spending your time on things that you're really passionate about instead of what you were doing before (which you may or may not be passionate about). You may have thought you loved your life before, but now you'll really love your life.

    Thanks for posting - it's fun to celebrate with you!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by pageta
      Well, that's the first phase. But then it gets better because you get ideas for more fun exciting things to do and you start spending your time on things that you're really passionate about instead of what you were doing before (which you may or may not be passionate about). You may have thought you loved your life before, but now you'll really love your life.
      … and in particular see David’s blog of October 6.

      Dave

      Comment


      • #4
        Dave's blog of Oct. 6th

        Went through all of Dave's blogs but couldn't find whichever one I should have looked at. Like the car, though, and the photos from the trip.

        Not so high today as yesterday. The day started off fine, looking in my time planner and my tickler and doing what I had to get done. Later, though, I got blocked by one of my authors who is very, very difficult to work with. He just won't do the re-writes I need from him. (I'm editing a school book, so we need to follow certain rules laid down by the Education Department, but he thinks he's writing a novel . ) Had to write him emails asking nicely, demanding, threatening, before I could get the material out of him. It's not the way I like to work.

        Being British, this frustration led me into the kitchen several times for cups of tea. How to deal with people who won't get things done when I'm trying to get things done?

        Switching off computer now to make more tea.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by izzy
          How to deal with people who won't get things done when I'm trying to get things done?
          A couple of ideas....

          Break down what you need into a next action for them. Instead of asking for the finished piece, ask for a rough draft to review. Make it as easy and simple as possible.

          Expressing confidence in their ability (aka "I know you're a great writer with lots of great ideas...so I'm really anxious to see what you have so far") can help.

          State your request in terms of what's in it for them. This may take a bit more thought, but is certainly worth it.

          Buy more tea...your favorite kind. Consider the project justification for drinking all you want.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by izzy
            Being British, this frustration led me into the kitchen several times for cups of tea. How to deal with people who won't get things done when I'm trying to get things done?
            Pageta's suggestion to buy more tea was a good one. Also a selection of your favorite tea biscuits and/or chocolates. If you think it would help, you could even send a package of these to the author.

            You might also dig a little deeper and figure out why he won't do the rewrites. That might help you figure out what lever to use to nudge him along. If he thinks the rewrite request is a stupid waste of his time, you might need to take a different approach than if he sincerely wants to do the rewrites but is stuck for some reason.

            I'm a writer myself, and I can tell you that even the most conscientous, deadline-focused, professional people out there sometimes do get stuck, usually without quite understanding why. If that's the situation in this case, helping him get unstuck is likely to be more effective in the long run than threatening him. If, on the other hand, he is just plain refusing to do the rewrite, your only alternative may be to beat the draft out of him by whatever means necessary, and cross him off your list for future projects.

            Katherine
            Last edited by kewms; 10-12-2005, 09:59 AM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by izzy
              Went through all of Dave's blogs but couldn't find whichever one I should have looked at. Like the car, though, and the photos from the trip.
              http://www.davidco.com/blogs/david/a...ptio.html#more

              It's a good description of where GTD can lead after the initial kick-ass action phase has died down.

              Dave

              Comment


              • #8
                One thing (action) at a time.

                Originally posted by pageta
                Break down what you need into a next action for them.
                I found that you can successfuly request from people one thing (action) at a time. It works for both - children and adults. If I ask my son to do the homework and tidy up his room - nothing is done. But when I ask him to do the math homework he will do it. Then I can ask him to learn biology and he will do it. And so on. The same works for adult people (90% of them are not good in multitasking and task scheduling).

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by kewms
                  I'm a writer myself, and I can tell you that even the most conscientous, deadline-focused, professional people out there sometimes do get stuck, usually without quite understanding why. If that's the situation in this case, helping him get unstuck is likely to be more effective in the long run than threatening him. If, on the other hand, he is just plain refusing to do the rewrite, your only alternative may be to beat the draft out of him by whatever means necessary, and cross him off your list for future projects.
                  Oh my goodness! Thank you for that! I can't stop laughing. I would like to think that I'm conscientous, deadline-focused, and professional, but I'm stuck on one of my writing projects right now. Brer Rabbit in the briar patch. I guess I need someone to beat the draft out of me!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    For what it's worth, when I'm stuck it's usually because I'm trying to rush the process. For example, if I start writing (non-fiction) before I've internalized my notes on the topic, I'll end up with superficial conventional wisdom. The only cure seems to be to step back, take a deep breath, and go back to the point where I veered off track.

                    Which of course is easier said then done when I'm rushing in the first place because of a looming deadline...

                    Katherine

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thanks to all of your for your good advice.
                      The author who won't do his re-writes isn't blocked. He just won't do his re-writes.
                      I've tried to encourage him; the project leader has tried to encourage him. No go. The man just wants every single thing he has written to come into the book exactly as he has written it. The sad thing is, because the guy is a first-time writer, the project leader and I both saw part of my job as giving him tips, author to author. Problem is, he just won't play ball. It's sad really. He's missing out on such a lot of creative fun. When I write something, I work hand in hand with my editor, brainstorming on the phone and in emails. When we meet, we always have such a good and productive time together. It's all down to team work, of course.

                      Had a look at the blog and will think about "process with perspective".

                      Am now going to start a new thread to do with an essential list and the stunning!! realization that I came to ...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by izzy
                        The man just wants every single thing he has written to come into the book exactly as he has written it. The sad thing is, because the guy is a first-time writer, the project leader and I both saw part of my job as giving him tips, author to author. Problem is, he just won't play ball. It's sad really.
                        Yep, that is sad. He's missing a golden chance to improve, and clearly hasn't figured out that *everyone* has room to improve.

                        It seems two groups of writers feel this way. Beginners, and those at the very top of the heap. At least beginners have the excuse of not knowing any better.

                        Katherine

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Try telling your stubborn writer that everyone needs a second pair of eyes and that authors who are truly professional tend to welcome editorial suggestions and changes. I once edited a book by a highly experienced editor, the head of a publishing company, and received profuse thanks. He, of all people, knew the value of an editor.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Is he your company President's son?

                            Originally posted by izzy
                            He just won't do his re-writes.
                            I've tried to encourage him; the project leader has tried to encourage him. No go. The man just wants every single thing he has written to come into the book exactly as he has written it.
                            Why do you have to work with this guy? What unique skills does he possess? Is he your company President's son?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by izzy
                              The man just wants every single thing he has written to come into the book exactly as he has written it.
                              Nobody gets that. It may be painful for him to accept feedback, but it's part of the necessary process of growing a thick enough skin.

                              Anyway, real writing happens in the rewrites.

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