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  • Any clues

    Hi.

    My partner and I are trying to implement GTD. He works in IT. He is trying to be proactive rather than reactive with his time at work, task/NA orientated etc.

    His colleagues and especially his boss expect him to be reactive especially to email and last minute meetings. He has tried to explain his new position but no joy

    Any pointers on sticking with GTD, in a GTD hostile environment?

  • #2
    Originally posted by willowdove
    His colleagues and especially his boss expect him to be reactive especially to email and last minute meetings. He has tried to explain his new position but no joy

    Any pointers on sticking with GTD, in a GTD hostile environment?
    Most jobs have an inherently reactive component to them. We usually cannot modify other people's expectations by explaining to them that we have joined some new cult and want *them* to change *their* behavior. Actually, I think GTD is probably your only hope is an environment with incessant demands for your attention. GTD is very much oriented to a "turn on a dime" approach rather than a more traditional goals and plans time management philosophy. I would just do GTD. It is often helpful to give the boss an indication of what projects one is handling. It is his or her job to prioritize if he or she will not give subordinates discretion.

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    • #3
      Agreed with mcogilvie. Heck, I think GTD is better suited to reactive environments than proactive ones. You don't need GTD as much in a proactive environment.

      Just keep processing your inbox, maintaining your Actions, etc. At least, that's my opinion.

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      • #4
        I agree as well. I don't think GTD is nearly as hostile to a reactive environment as something like Seven Habits. One thing I liked about GTD was that Allen clearly *gets* the fire drill aspect of many workplaces.

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