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  • Question about lists

    I've read the book (GTD) and I am getting ready to get started, but would like to better understand how to use the @computer, @home, @calls, @errands, etc. lists.

    First question, are these lists next action lists?

    Secondly, one forum outlined the following daily process:

    Scan next action lists
    Review calendar
    Check tickler file

    Am I to place specific time on my calendar to make calls, run errands? It if is not in my calendar then how am I to remember to do it?

  • #2
    Originally posted by Hoosier72
    I've read the book (GTD) and I am getting ready to get started, but would like to better understand how to use the @computer, @home, @calls, @errands, etc. lists.

    First question, are these lists next action lists?
    Yes.

    Secondly, one forum outlined the following daily process:

    Scan next action lists
    Review calendar
    Check tickler file

    Am I to place specific time on my calendar to make calls, run errands? It if is not in my calendar then how am I to remember to do it?
    If you want to place scheduled times on your calendar, go ahead. Otherwise you rely on the Next Action list for your current context.

    Katherine

    Comment


    • #3
      Do you place a date on the action that is in the @errands, @projects, @home, etc. list?

      If I don't have the action items on my calendar then how do I determine which actions are needing to get done that day and how do I know I have enough time to do it?

      Comment


      • #4
        Strict GTD does not date action items. Items that must be done on a specific date go on the calendar, everything else is undated.

        I do date items, mostly as a way to flag deadlines and filter out things that are not yet relevant. Still, I don't have a "Daily Action List" in the DayTimer/Franklin-Covey sense of the word.

        For me, the first step in deciding what needs to be done is the Weekly Review. I move everything that *won't* get done in the next week or two off of my current action list. I might also flag priority projects for the week.

        The next step is to review my calendar and action lists first thing in the morning and decide what my priorities are for the day.

        Katherine

        Comment


        • #5
          So if you have 3 calendar entries for the day and you have 10 action list to review and notice that there are 6 or so actions you want to do that day do you put a place holder on our calendar for time to work on the actions?

          I'm really concerened about having all of these lists. I'm missing the connection between the calendar and knowing when to do something on the lists. Just seem like there is room for missing an action.

          I guess the concern I have is that by not having my actions on my calendar and having 10-20 or more lists to manage, I'll spend psyche RAM trying to keep track of all the action items.

          Maybe I should just try it. Did you have the same concerns?

          Comment


          • #6
            Well first of all, why would you have "10 or 20" more action lists to manage? All of my current actions, in all contexts, fit on a single sheet of paper. If your lists are much longer than that, you aren't going to be able to accomplish everything in a single week anyway. Decide what won't get done, and ignore it until at least your next Weekly Review.

            I usually don't put place holders on my calendar, but then I usually don't have many appointments. Usually, I simply mark my top 5-10 actions with a highlighter. If a place holder helps you, by all means use it. If putting an action on your calendar helps you, do it.

            Katherine

            Comment


            • #7
              Re-read chapter 9. Doing: Making the best action choices.

              Why would you need to manage 10-20 lists? If you are at work and have discretionary time at best you will have 3-4 lists to review:

              @Office, @Calls, @Computer, & @Internet

              There is no need to review any of the following lists because you are not in those contexts:

              @Home -- you're not at home, @Errands -- you're not running errands, @projects (Technically @projects is your project list and not a next action list most people use "projects" instead of "@projects" ) -- you can't do a project.

              As for the four contexts you could do you'll make a choice based on how pressed you are for time in that context. I usually pick off @Office things first because my time in that context is the most constrained. I can make calls pretty much anywhere with a cell phone so that list gets looked at and acted on frequently while travelling or just driving to lunch and back. @Computer can be done (depending somewhat on seating) while travelling even @Internet stuff can be done from the Admirials Club or Starbucks with a t-mobile account.

              I occasionally put something on my calendar as either an un-timed next action or as block time to work on a specific action. (e.g. I make an appointment with myself to do something that is deadline driven).

              I do this partly to ensure I meet the deadline and partly because if I didn't block time I'd have 10 hours of meetings on my calendar every day.

              I also will put due dates on next actions. This is not strictly part of GTD but it does help you make priority selections when you have discretionary time.

              Comment


              • #8
                Begin with 3 Next Action lists.

                Originally posted by Hoosier72
                having 10-20 or more lists to manage
                Begin with 3 Next Action lists: @Work, @Home, @Errands. In each context you will need to browse only one list.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Great thoughts. I appreciate the feedback. Question about the @agenda list. How does this get managed? The book recommends separate agenda list for each individual and suggest this might be between 3-15 lists. Do you review these daily? Has this become automatic thinking in regards to pulling the file, etc. as you are interacting with the individual etc. I would be concerned that I put something important on the agenda list for a particular individual but do to having to manage 10+ agenda list it might not get addressed. Should I place this item on my calendar?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Hoosier72
                    Great thoughts. I appreciate the feedback. Question about the @agenda list. How does this get managed? The book recommends separate agenda list for each individual and suggest this might be between 3-15 lists. Do you review these daily? Has this become automatic thinking in regards to pulling the file, etc. as you are interacting with the individual etc. I would be concerned that I put something important on the agenda list for a particular individual but do to having to manage 10+ agenda list it might not get addressed. Should I place this item on my calendar?
                    In my experience, agendas are best for people with whom you meet regularly anyway. "I don't need to bother Bob about that now, I'll just remember if for our meeting next week." If it's something important, or someone with whom you don't have regular meetings, I'd treat it as an @phone or @email instead.

                    Katherine

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Don't forget the tickler file...

                      If something is on one of my context lists and I haven't given it a spin, but feel the need to, I'll drop a note in my tickler just to give myself a nudge.

                      Comment

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