Forum

  • If you are new to these Forums, please take a moment to register using the fields above.

Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Impact Of Latest Travel Restrictions

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Impact Of Latest Travel Restrictions

    Item/next action for review: go through your next actions and checklists to allow for the impact that the latest travel restrictions in the UK are going to have on those of us who travel internationally.

    I often pass through the US en route to assignments ( 1 - 3 months or even more in duration) in Central America. I have no problem with the Dept of Homeland Security and other agencies, they're doing a good job - I write as a Brit.

    The new ban in the UK on cabin luggage is draconian, but if that's what is deemed necessary in this war against terror, so be it.

    My checklists etc have been compiled so that I can always start an assigment until any missing checked luggage catches up, as happened last month in a trip to Europe.

    I am unhappy about the way previously cabin luggage items will travel in checked luggage: (a) luggage handling problems result from mistakes or crime, so no control there; (b) the impact on my work if the checked luggage goes astray (for whatever reason); (c) how will the aircraft ground crew get cabin luggage as well as checked luggage into the containers for the hold?

    I think we need to start looking at solutions for those of us who have very good reasons for carrying important items of kit with us. Early suggestions on the BBC site include sending notebook/laptop etc by courier ahead of one's trip. I run a one-man independent management and commercial consultancy, so it looks like I will have to buy a second notebook; one would be sent by courier a few days before my departure, I would use the other for the remaining few days, then pack it into my checked luggage (lucky I bought a bigger hard shell case last year! Hint to others: hard shell is the optimum solution for checked luggage even though it is heavier).

    I'd like to know what readers might think of the following idea which would allow passengers to take cabin luggage under the following conditions:
    (1) Such passengers would have to check-in an hour earlier than current practice. Maybe we would have to apply in advance so that some security checks can made re background, previous trips etc
    (2) Cabin items would be closely inspected. Items rejected would have to go with checked luggage (this is going to change packing lists, having to leave enough room in the checked case!).
    (3) Approved items would go into passneger's cabin bag which in turn would be placed in a special locked numbered container with special label (cross-referenced to passport, ticket etc).
    (4) These cabin bag containers would be retained by the airline until actual boarding. The containers could be placed by the door and opened as the passenger arrives at the actual aircraft door and produces receipt, ID etc. An alternative would be to place the containers on the passengers' seat, open them when the passenger arrives at his seat and then take the empty containers off the aircraft.
    (5) Perhaps cabin luggage passengers will have to board first, and probably pay a fee for this service.

    Anyway, this development makes a review of our checklists essential. The knock-on effects, even if the current measures are only to be with us for a short while. Apart from the fall-off in sales at airport shops, luggage manufacturers are going to have a look at their designs - will the current "soft" designs stand up to the stresses of travelling as checked luggage????

    What do other interested readers think?

    Regards,

    Kibo Kid

  • #2
    Web-based work environment and laptops for rent.

    Originally posted by Kibo Kid
    Early suggestions on the BBC site include sending notebook/laptop etc by courier ahead of one's trip. I run a one-man independent management and commercial consultancy, so it looks like I will have to buy a second notebook; one would be sent by courier a few days before my departure, I would use the other for the remaining few days, then pack it into my checked luggage (lucky I bought a bigger hard shell case last year! Hint to others: hard shell is the optimum solution for checked luggage even though it is heavier).
    It's time for web-based work environment and laptops for rent at your destination. No need to carry your hardware, software and data with you.

    Comment


    • #3
      I think we are all screwed as far as air travel goes. A colleague of mine suggested that the end point is planes full of completely naked passengers who have been knocked unconscious for the duration of each flight.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thankfully the US restriction only apply to liquids and gels. PC and other 'electronic' devises are still allowed ... subject to increased security.

        Given the UK situation, updating checklists is a good suggestion. Additionally, one should also look at updating insurance coverage for 'checked' items ... damage, loss and theft are still issues for checked baggage!

        On the suggestion of a preferred" status "idea which would allow passengers to take cabin luggage", there was serious talk after 9/11 (by various interest groups) for a TSA/FAA Preferred Traveller program. For a fee business travelers could be vetted and thus pass through a designated security gate with minimal inconvenience. While a lot of work was done on this proposal, it was ultimately vetoed by the Government. It is therefore unlikely that this type of program will resurrected any time soon.

        Our best hope is the a Government will analysis what it got out of this plot and make acceptable decisions re carry on baggage.

        In the meant time, update those checklists, give yourself plenty of time to check in and take up some form of mediation to remain relaxed.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by mcogilvie
          I think we are all screwed as far as air travel goes. A colleague of mine suggested that the end point is planes full of completely naked passengers who have been knocked unconscious for the duration of each flight.
          I envisioned a cabin of naked people with their hands handcuffed to the armrests and their feet chained to the floor, a la "Con Air."

          "You are now free to move about the, uh, never mind."

          Comment


          • #6
            Perhaps a return to a slower age, when people traveled by train and ship and it was acceptable to take weeks in transit? A girl can dream, can't she?

            Those who can afford to will fly private planes, and this will push those who are "on the bubble" about that decision over the edge. 9/11 turned out to not provide the big boost to teleconferencing that some suggested, but the technology has improved since then, and security measures are approaching the intolerable level.

            "Secure" vendors, like those inside security and the airlines themselves, will clean up on basic toiletries. Paperback book sellers will do okay also, especially if the ban on electronic devices stands or spreads. If that ban continues, there will need to be radical improvements in baggage handling. Losing someone's suit is one thing. Losing truly valuable stuff like laptops and cameras is something else again.

            Katherine

            PS Preferred status is a non-starter. People won't sign up unless it simplifies things, and the TSA won't approve it if it creates a security hole.

            Comment


            • #7
              Working Via The Web

              Originally posted by TesTeq
              It's time for web-based work environment and laptops for rent at your destination. No need to carry your hardware, software and data with you.
              Thanks, TesTeq.
              However, I sometimes work in places with an Internet connection and little else. Some of these connections are not very robust, so I do not want to rely on the Web entirely although such applications are getting better. Also, I often work offline in my accommodation, restaurant etc.
              After my original posting I have been considering another solution which is cheaper than buying a second notebook now and has other benefits. I am thinking of setting up a Network Attached Storage (NAT) device in my home office. In addition to sharing data, I can store an image of my notebook on the device (I already back up an image daily onto an external portable hard disk, but I may no longer be able to carry that with me!). If my checked luggage with notebook is lost, I could then buy a replacement notebook (hopefully under the insurance policy) from the nearest local supplier (maybe Internet/mail order), connect to the NAT in my home office via the Internet/Web and copy the image onto the new notebook.

              Kibo Kid

              Comment


              • #8
                Insurance On Uk Checked Luggage

                Originally posted by ReBuild
                Given the UK situation, updating checklists is a good suggestion. Additionally, one should also look at updating insurance coverage for 'checked' items ... damage, loss and theft are still issues for checked baggage!
                Thanks, ReBuild, for this reminder about the insurance policy.
                I hope the UK authorities will reconsider the blanket ban on the tools of my trade and those of millions of fellow travellers. As it stands, it means I cannot use my mobile phone or Pocket PC in transit as they will also be in the checked luggage - the telephone operators at airports will be rubbing their hands! At least in transit through the US, eg Houston, I hope I will be able to extract my briefcase and devices (which means less room in my checked luggage for other stuff when I leave the UK!) before rechecking my hard shell case for the next stage in my journey.
                Other people rubbing their hands? Crooked baggage handlers processing luggage from the UK!

                Kibo Kid

                Comment


                • #9
                  Reading Matter On Uk Flights Etc

                  Originally posted by kewms
                  "Secure" vendors, like those inside security and the airlines themselves, will clean up on basic toiletries. Paperback book sellers will do okay also, especially if the ban on electronic devices stands or spreads. If that ban continues, there will need to be radical improvements in baggage handling. Losing someone's suit is one thing. Losing truly valuable stuff like laptops and cameras is something else again.

                  Katherine

                  PS Preferred status is a non-starter. People won't sign up unless it simplifies things, and the TSA won't approve it if it creates a security hole.
                  Hi Katherine,
                  As things stand, the thought of not even being able to read on flights seems awful. I expect the airlines will be able to use the space in the overhead lockers to store books, newspapers and magazines for sale in flight!!!!
                  Re Preferred Status: I would envisage my original proposal on an "as required" basis, not membership of a PS "club". I already make sure I get to check-in early (most of my clients only pay for an economy class ticket!), so getting there another hour earlier is no problem for me, even if does mean the taxi arriving at my home at 03:00!

                  Kibo Kid

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Kibo Kid
                    Hi Katherine,
                    As things stand, the thought of not even being able to read on flights seems awful.

                    Kibo Kid
                    Hi

                    Yes pretty scarey on a 24 hour flight from Sydney to London! However I saw the first people getting off the Heathrow Sydney flight on TV tonight and one said that once they had done security at Heathrow and were in the secure area they could buy books to take onto the plane.

                    There are other solutions to the laptop problems such as putting the contents of your laptop onto a few DVD's or maybe a Blue-ray which are coming and hold 25GB. If you have permission to take this you can put it onto a hire machine at the other end or a rented machine on the plane. There is also internet available on some planes now --- just need to have keyboards to go with the individual LCD video screen (and CPU's). Another possibility is ebooks screened onto the LCD in front of you.

                    I suspect that the need to use phones and laptops in transit compared to the idea of 10 jumbos dropping out of the sky over major cities means phones and laptops are going to lose. As plane capacities are about to double the potential for a disaster increases.

                    Michael

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by mmurray
                      I suspect that the need to use phones and laptops in transit compared to the idea of 10 jumbos dropping out of the sky over major cities means phones and laptops are going to lose. As plane capacities are about to double the potential for a disaster increases.
                      It is and was unlikely that all of the targeted planes would crash, given the nature and volume of the explosive. Perhaps 1 or 2 in 10. This is truly a war of terror, and of economic disruption. On that ground, the terrorists are clearly winning, because for an investment on the order of $100,000's, they are getting billions of dollars of economic loss and damage. So even when the plot is uncovered before it is is put into effect, they win.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Things To Do On A Long Flight

                        Originally posted by mmurray
                        Hi

                        Yes pretty scarey on a 24 hour flight from Sydney to London! However I saw the first people getting off the Heathrow Sydney flight on TV tonight and one said that once they had done security at Heathrow and were in the secure area they could buy books to take onto the plane.

                        There are other solutions to the laptop problems such as putting the contents of your laptop onto a few DVD's or maybe a Blue-ray which are coming and hold 25GB. If you have permission to take this you can put it onto a hire machine at the other end or a rented machine on the plane. There is also internet available on some planes now --- just need to have keyboards to go with the individual LCD video screen (and CPU's). Another possibility is ebooks screened onto the LCD in front of you.

                        I suspect that the need to use phones and laptops in transit compared to the idea of 10 jumbos dropping out of the sky over major cities means phones and laptops are going to lose. As plane capacities are about to double the potential for a disaster increases.

                        Michael
                        Thanks, Michael, yes, I did pick up this point about the duty-free shops still being able to sell their wares. I will confine myself to a good read and maybe watching whatever in-flight movie is on, but I have to say that I usually do NOT watch movies on board and prefer to listen to my MP3 player through my Bose headphones - both these currently banned as well!

                        I understand taking CDs/DVDs (or anything else other than the passport, glasses, medication etc)on board is a no-no. What about work papers and files?

                        I am hoping that the authorities will gradually allow acceptable stuff back on, subject to good security and screening practices. As I read the current situation, one cannot even take a flash drive other than one purchased at the duty-free which is useless.

                        I will let the forum know what I will be doing on my next long-haul trip.

                        Thanks again to everyone who gave feedback and suggestions.

                        Kibo Kid

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The UK Government has revised the restrictions on hand/carry-on luggage:

                          Heathrow Airport

                          Important Message

                          15 August 2006

                          Following the Government’s reduction in security levels from critical to severe, passengers are reminded that strict security remains in place at all UK airports. This easing of restrictions is not a return to normal.

                          The revised regulations will continue to have an impact on our airport operations. All passengers will be subject to hand baggage restrictions. Passengers are asked to be patient while these additional security measures are in place. Delays are likely, and anyone travelling over the next few days is asked to allow extra time for their journey and to arrive at the airport prepared.

                          Hand baggage restrictions
                          In brief, passengers are now permitted to carry ONE item of cabin baggage through the airport security search point. The cabin bag should be no bigger than 45cm wide x 35cm long x 16cm deep (17.7" wide × 13.7" long × 6.2" deep), including wheels, handles, side pockets - equivalent to a small laptop bag or rucksack.

                          The restrictions on contents allowed in cabin baggage have now been relaxed and the items prohibited from cabin baggage are now as follows: Any cosmetics, any toiletries, including toothpaste, hair gel, lotions, perfume, deodorant, shaving foam, aerosols, etc, any liquids, any drinks and any sharp objects.

                          Further passenger information
                          Before security: all shops and catering outlets are open to all passengers. Hand baggage is now allowed BUT any liquids and gels must be packed into your luggage for check-in. Any other purchases must fit into your hand luggage.

                          Once through security: all shops and catering outlets are open to all passengers. If you are travelling to any destination except the USA then you can take all items purchased in the departures lounge into the aircraft cabin. All passengers boarding flights to the USA are not permitted to take any liquid or gel items into the aircraft cabin.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X