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Getting started with GTD

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  • Getting started with GTD

    After 15 or more years with the DaytimerCovey paradigms, I am making a commitment to shift to the GTD model. This is motivated by a change in my job (the change actually occurred 3 years ago and it took me this long to realize the old model wasn't working). I woul dlike to discuss the various tools to use to implement the model.

    I have discarded my 2pg/day planner-but am unsure of what to use in its place. I am hesitant to invest in a PDA because of the start up cost, and because I don't want to be tied to my computer - and OF COURSE the software at work is not the same as the software at home. I figure when I do get around to buying one, they will become obsolete...or I will drop the ^$&(* thing right out of the box. They ARE very cool, tho.

    I've read David's suggestions for setting up a paper planner, and would like to know if anyone else is using the model; I mas thinking of an 8.5 x 11 "mothership" with a pocket satellite that I could take everywhere. The satellite would contain only mission critical appointments, phone numbers, and lists (wine is a mission critical list)

    ON review, I realize these questions are probably naive and basic, so I thank you in advance for your patience and tolerance as I try to re-invent myself.

  • #2
    "I mas thinking of an 8.5 x 11 "mothership" with a pocket satellite that I could take everywhere"

    Do yourself a favor, get a PDA that way you can have all your lists, and all your info with you at all times. You could get a very basic (i.e. cheap) PDA, set it up with no added applications (not I how work, but useful in your situation) and be up and running quickly (see David's advice on how to set-up a PDA).

    I am not "tied to my computer" as I do not use my PC for anything other then a second tier back-up (I rely on rotating back-ups to a built in memory stick on my sony CLIE). Thus having different computers at work and home is irrelevant. As far as being "obsolete", even a simple PDA will be fine for your needs, and it is irrelevant if it is the latest or not.

    Before you buy one, go the a store and check out the low end palm OS models (do not get pocket PC) made by palm and sony i.e. hold them in your hand, check out the displays, etc.

    I used to carry around a time design binder, and never regretted switching to PDA.

    Scott

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    • #3
      Re: Getting started with GTD

      Originally posted by KC3
      I've read David's suggestions for setting up a paper planner, and would like to know if anyone else is using the model; I mas thinking of an 8.5 x 11 "mothership" with a pocket satellite that I could take everywhere. The satellite would contain only mission critical appointments, phone numbers, and lists (wine is a mission critical list)
      I have been using the Time/Design binder (www.timedesign.com if you are in NorthAmerica). This works well with NextActions, or many context lists. I use this as my hardlandscape, the Palm Vx a reference only. Capturing and overview for me work best on paper.

      Also, with Daytimer/Covey you can purchase ToDo sheets that are then used for context (@home, @phone, @computer, SomeDay...) if you wish to try David'd method without a large outlay.

      Many people will say PPC/Palm are best, and they are for that person, may be for you also.

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      • #4
        Stick with paper while you are learning GTD. Then move to a PDA if it suits you. If you try to learn both PDA and GTD at once, it will be that much more difficult for you.

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        • #5
          Paper GTD Administration

          Covey has a Project Page in the size you want to implement. I reccomend the project pages to detail the main details of the project itself, and utilize a the standard To Do Sheets for the next actions, or, as I did use Covey's cut-away pages to handle next actions. The cut away pages are 3/4 the height of the full 8x11 Project page and if inserted directly in front of the the Project page it allows you to view the Project title as well as the next actions. Set up a section in the mothership for projects, and you'll give the PDA guys a run for their money probably.
          Hope this helps some
          George
          GenTek Software

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