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Dealing with large-format paper?

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  • Dealing with large-format paper?

    Hello, GTD'ers.

    I'm just getting started on GTD, but I have what feels like a stumbling-block. I work for a mechanical engineering company. Archaic or not, we still go through tons of paper. Most of the drawings I work on and work from are plotted either B-size (11x17) or D-size (22x34). This makes traditional filing and organizing rather challenging.

    Yes, we do have large-size hanging files, but those are for "permanent" storage of finalized drawings. There's no way an Easi-File cabinet will fit in this drafter's cubicle.

    I need some suggestions on how to cope with the sheer volume of oversized paper I have to manage on a regular basis. Anything B-size, I can fold in half and place in a regular file. It's the D-sizes that are the real headache. Sometimes they're just for reference, sometimes they're "redlines" (corrections & changes scribbled in red ink) which I've got to work directly from.

    Whatever the purpose, I'd love to hear some ideas on how to wrangle my mountain of oversized engineering drawings. Anyone?

    Thanks in advance,


    -Scott

  • #2
    Carts that hold rolled larger pages?

    Greetings,

    I've seen carts that hold larger, rolled peices of paper, such as drawings-- something that's maybe (I'm guessing fom memory) eighteen-by-eightenn inches, divided by wirese into a (perhaps) five-by-five grid, holding 25 rolled drawings. How many drawings to you have to store in your cube at once? Would one or two of these cards do the job?

    You could then write lables on color-coded slips of paper that you clip to the top, to take the place of file-folders and tags.

    Edit-- I did a quick Google to see if I could find a link to what I was talking about, and found something that might work better for a cube anyway:
    http://www.draftingfurniture.com/rollfiles.html


    Edited again-- and here's something closer to what I was origionally thinking of, but in "box" rather than "Cart" form:

    http://www.engineersupply.com/Manage...t-Storage.aspx
    Last edited by LJM; 11-24-2006, 09:44 AM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Boxes

      Hey, not bad! I like the second, upright style. I think it'd fit nicely under my desk. I don't think the horizontal ones would fit well on my desk. Plus, they seem like they might be a bit pricey and more elaborate than I need. I suppose with a little spare cardboard, I could probably make a weekend arts-and-crafts project out of building something on my own.

      As for how long these drawings hang around, well, it varies significantly. Some are next-day changes, others are medium-term pending, others are reference material.

      Thanks for the ideas.


      -Scott

      Comment


      • #4
        Scott, welcome to the forum!

        I'm a civil engineer, and the most ingenious solution I've used, though not my idea, was cutoffs of PVC pipe! If you know a mechanical contractor, you should be able to get tons of them, 2' long in various diameters. Just stack them up under the counter in your cube. You can write the name of the project on the outside of the bottom edge of each roll of redlines so they're easy to identify.

        For drawings that don't need to be at arm's reach, see if you can lobby for a flat file near your cube.

        Comment


        • #5
          Scott
          Given that others got to the rolled paper solution first, I'll throw out an alternative .... Artist carry/portfolio cases. You could get a couple and label them to your needs.

          In my view the advantage of a portfolio case, if you have the space, is that the paper remains flat. It's also a nice week end art-and-crafts project.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by jethro View Post
            I'm a civil engineer, and the most ingenious solution I've used, though not my idea, was cutoffs of PVC pipe! If you know a mechanical contractor, you should be able to get tons of them, 2' long in various diameters. Just stack them up under the counter in your cube. You can write the name of the project on the outside of the bottom edge of each roll of redlines so they're easy to identify.
            Unfortunately, I don't deal directly with any contractors. Simply a designer/drafter. However... this is a slick idea. It's a bit labor-intensive on part, since I'd have to buy the PVC myself, along with a saw to cut them to length. I don't think you're supposed to cut PVC on a table saw, and that's all I've got at present.

            -S

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by ReBuild View Post
              Given that others got to the rolled paper solution first, I'll throw out an alternative .... Artist carry/portfolio cases. You could get a couple and label them to your needs.
              Oooh, now this is an idea I like! It's simple, cheap, and effective (like me). Even those red-paper portfolios would work, and those are quite inexpensive. I've got plenty of space under my desk to stash them, and they're very easy to access.

              You want to talk arts-and-crafts? Let's think up a (simple, cheap, effective) way to create tabbed dividers for a portfolio filled with drawings... I'm seeing something involving manilla folders, the paper-cutter, and a glue stick

              Cheers,


              -Scott

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Scott View Post
                You want to talk arts-and-crafts? Let's think up a (simple, cheap, effective) way to create tabbed dividers for a portfolio filled with drawings... I'm seeing something involving manilla folders, the paper-cutter, and a glue stick
                How about sheets of poster board instead?

                Katherine

                Comment


                • #9
                  Years ago I worked in interior design, and we used racks like these to manage plans. The bars that grip the paper can be purchased individually too. Racks can hang from a cubicle with some adaptive accessories.


                  Safco® Drop And Lift Wall Rack, Tropic Sand

                  Stationary steel rack is designed for art and drafting storage needs. Drop/lift design bolts to a wall and extends less than 12". Holds up to 1,200 sheets in 12 hanging clamps (sold separately). Includes mounting hardware.


                  emkay

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