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Projects-Spouse?

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  • Projects-Spouse?

    I have a question that I would like to bring to the forum. Now, I know that I have often chastised folks here for being non-canonical (not exactly by the book) when it comes to methods and implementation- and I apologize for that before bringing my question forth.

    Here goes:

    I have noticed during collection and mind sweeps that joint projects between my wife and I have been taking my attention, or at least she desires my involvement. I love to help where I can, but I- like many fine men - have been in space when she brings these critical things up. My question is: what is the popular opinion about segmenting my projects list yet a third time (so far personal and work) to include a Spouse section? I think that this would benefit me by putting a project stake in the ground, while at the same time understanding that this segment of the projects list will most likely include heavier involvement from her- also nice to have segmented when I review at home with her.

    I am open to any opinions abut this, from by the book people and not-so-by-the-book people.

    Thanks,
    Erik

  • #2
    Hmmm . . . interesting idea, and one I think I'm going to have to adopt in some way, shape or form

    I figure that as long as you're looking at your project lists regularly, and its not too much to try to decide which list the projects go on, which, given the background you've given, doesn't seem like it would be much of a problem, there isn't really an issue at all.

    In some ways, it might even make things easier. The way I see it is that if you wanted to keep them in your personal project list, then you could always add a note to the project header that it is a "Spouse" project, but that could just add extra clutter to the list.

    All in all, I'd say go for it. It's at least worth a trial, and if after a few weeks it isn't working, no harm no foul, but if it is, then keep it going!

    Cheers,

    Adam

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    • #3
      The by-the-book way to handle this would be to have an @Agenda-Spouse list and/or a @With Spouse context.

      By segmenting your project list by Personal and Work categories, you are already splitting off from strict by-the-book GTD. But if it works for you, go for it.

      Katherine

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      • #4
        i AGREE

        Originally posted by kewms View Post
        The by-the-book way to handle this would be to have an @Agenda-Spouse list and/or a @With Spouse context.

        By segmenting your project list by Personal and Work categories, you are already splitting off from strict by-the-book GTD. But if it works for you, go for it.

        Katherine
        Yes, Katherine- I know I am breaking canon!

        I run into problems where Context lists fail. My spouse often forgets things from the agenda list I have for her... I need the bigger stake, the project segment, in order to not let anything fall through the cracks.

        Thanks for the feedback.

        -Erik

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        • #5
          I don't see anything wrong with it. I have work, home, and Scouting and I'm certainly open to including more categories (is that the right term?) as needed. That's the beauty of GTD, it's flexible.

          Comment


          • #6
            define an outcome to your project

            I suggest defining an outcome for your project, such as "maintain open communication with my wife regarding joint projects".

            This would force you to a) define what these projects are, and b) ponder "do I feel I have open communication regarding these projects?", "does she feel we have open communication?" during weekly review.

            Then the project materials would be things that help that goal for you (reading on the subject of open communication between spouses, reminders to self to incorporate more communication into routines/daily activities).

            I have used this technique with some success for social goals (for example one of my higher altitude goals is to maintain weekly contact with friend A, so my outcome is "organize and spend time with Friend A" and I can ask myself how I am doing on that when my weekly review comes). I have seen or called friend A every week since I have started doing this (several months), and we have both benefitted.

            Comment


            • #7
              Spouse Project

              it depends on how you are approaching it and what you want to accomplish. I have a couple of key projects related to my wife:

              1. Honeydo - which is that never-ending honey do list. Most of the things my wife wants me to do are simple single action tasks rather than projects and I find by lumping them into a project as a sort of collector its a little easier to have this break out by stuff I need to do for my wife as well as by context.

              2. Datenight - which is an on-going project that I keep open for our date night activities.

              Of course I may also have larger projects that are spouse related but I don't usually find it necessary to break them out separately.

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