Forum

  • If you are new to these Forums, please take a moment to register using the fields above.
Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
several next actions for a project - newbie question Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • several next actions for a project - newbie question

    Hi,

    I am new to GTD and I find ti very excting. One thing is not clear to me.
    Often a project is breakdown in a series of sequential actions:
    Action 1
    Action 2
    ...
    Action n

    Action 1 Should be on "Next actions".

    Where fall Others actions?

    Thanks for your answers

  • #2
    if they're truly sequential, ie, action 2 can only be done once action 1 is completed then I list the further next actions in my project notes and transfer over in to my action lists as dictated by the sequence.

    My experience is that at any one time, most of my projects have multiple actions that can occur concurrently. In this case, I put all the next actions in my action lists (with a tag back to the appropriate project).

    I run my gtd system on outlook as in the davidco white paper.

    I hope that helps, or at least makes sense!

    Comment


    • #3
      Decide what your next action is

      Originally posted by petere View Post
      My experience is that at any one time, most of my projects have multiple actions that can occur concurrently. In this case, I put all the next actions in my action lists (with a tag back to the appropriate project).
      Remember that even if "multiple actions that can occur concurrently" you should always decide what your next action should be. Pick one of them and put it on your next-action list. You can write down the others, in a note-section or somewhere else, and look at them if you need a new action. Once you have decided which is your next-action, you don't have to make that decission the next time you enter the actual context. This way you have tricked yourself into a flying start the next time you are @Office, @chainsaw or somewhere else.

      Tore.

      Comment


      • #4
        I have a variation on the same question.

        Most of the answers I've seen depend on particular software tools such as outlook. Maybe they have to be answered that way -- you tell me.

        Anyway -- I have many action items defined for various projects. But they are NOT the 'next action item' -- they are somewhere down the road. So the question is, where do I keep those action items?

        Currently, I keep a list of all my projects in one place, in a Word file. If I start adding action items to that file, I lose the ability to see all my projects at a glance. So I guess that what I want is an 'expandable' utility where I can see all my projects at a glance, and where I can expand any of them to see actions underneath.

        Sounds like I should investigate outlook. Maybe I should look at linked mind maps. Am I on the right track? Should I explore other approaches? Somebody mentioned a white paper -- which one is it?

        Thanks

        Comment


        • #5
          You can use the outline function in Word to allow you to put detail under an item and chose to display or hide the detail. You set the outline level using the outline tool bar. In Help look for "About viewing a document as an outline" or "create an outline from scratch". With the outline items closed, you have a list of all your projects. With one outline item open, you can have all the detail you want about your project.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by petere View Post
            In this case, I put all the next actions in my action lists (with a tag back to the appropriate project).
            Two thoughts, based on how my own system works:
            1. I tend to limit my Next Actions for a given project to no more than one per context. That is, "Project A" can have at most 1 entry on any given context list. That way, I can move Project A forward in as many different contexts as possible, but I don't overwhelm my list with possible choices.
            2. I've found, at least for me and my work, that pre-defining future actions I might need to take for a project is usually a waste of time. When I've tried in the past to define and capture future actions, I've seen project scope and direction change in ways that rendered all my prior NAs obsolete. And, for me, having to take a moment to think about the Next Action when I complete one is a way to stay "plugged in" to where my projects are and what's going on, a chance to do a mini-review of that project.

            Nevertheless, if you want to brainstorm possible future NAs and capture them someplace, I'd say they belong with your project support materials.

            -- Tammy

            Comment


            • #7
              Use of MindManager to keep a clear picture

              I recommend Mind Manager to keep my projects list. For each entry, you can have as many subtopics as you want, each being a next action item. But you can "hide" the subtopics so that you can clearly see just the main topics which becomes your project list.



              Originally posted by ArcCaster View Post
              I have a variation on the same question.

              Most of the answers I've seen depend on particular software tools such as outlook. Maybe they have to be answered that way -- you tell me.

              Anyway -- I have many action items defined for various projects. But they are NOT the 'next action item' -- they are somewhere down the road. So the question is, where do I keep those action items?

              Currently, I keep a list of all my projects in one place, in a Word file. If I start adding action items to that file, I lose the ability to see all my projects at a glance. So I guess that what I want is an 'expandable' utility where I can see all my projects at a glance, and where I can expand any of them to see actions underneath.

              Sounds like I should investigate outlook. Maybe I should look at linked mind maps. Am I on the right track? Should I explore other approaches? Somebody mentioned a white paper -- which one is it?

              Thanks

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks for the great suggestions!

                Since my todo list is already in word, I went the Word Outline route -- very nice It is great to be able to alphabetize the projects (using table->sort) without affecting any of the action items under each. My todo list (action items) is now cleaner and shorter, and identifying 'project categories' for all those action items that are way out in the future gave me insight into where I am spending my time and where there are gaps.

                And now I have acquired a new action item -- go through my newly-created projects list, and separate it into 'live projects' and 'someday maybe'.

                Comment

                Working...
                X