Forum

  • If you are new to these Forums, please take a moment to register using the fields above.

Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Natural planning and project lists

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Natural planning and project lists

    I'd like to read feedback on how much clarifying people do when they put projects on their lists. In other words, I might write "Organize garage" on my project list, but David Allen would suggest I define my purpose and principles on this, define my vision/outcome, then brainstorm, organize, and plan the next actions.

    So is it more successful to write a goal something like this: "Organize garage so we utilize the space more effectively"?

    If you are a PDA-user, do you include your vision/outcome in the notes section of the project on your Project list?

    My obvious fear is it's going to take me much longer to add a project to my list.

  • #2
    Projects

    What does it take to get it out of your head and into a system you trust?

    Thats the criteria for deciding how much defining you need to do.

    (I think)

    ~Mark

    Comment


    • #3
      Purpose of a project list

      Originally posted by Ann
      So is it more successful to write a goal something like this: "Organize garage so we utilize the space more effectively"?
      Personally, I have always used the Projects list in two ways:

      1) As a quick reminder (what, exactly, and why, significantly, did I commit to?); and
      2) To image-in (actually see it before I see it) the outcome. (If you've been to the Vision and Focus workshop, you'll have a better idea of what this is about.

      I review my projects/outcomes list once a week (at least) to ensure I've got moving parts on all my end results.

      Comment


      • #4
        Natural planning and project lists

        Here's my secret to incorporating planning into Project names: begin with a noun, and write the Project name in past tense. This is consistent with David's suggestions to look beyond the completion date, envision wild success, and note what you see. This way, you are forced to see the thing completed, or the result in place. Really give it a go. What, specifically, do you want to have happened when this is done?

        During the weekly review, the Project name becomes a question. By adding a question mark at the end during the review, it is easy to check off or add a new action. "Garage workshop shelves in place" is subtly but importantly different from "Build garage shelves for workshop".

        The other advantage for me is that I don't get my Projects and Next Actions confused as easily. Project? Begins with a noun, written in past tense (as the place it will be when complete). Next Action? Begins with a verb, written in present tense (as something that can be done now).

        Hope this helps,
        Scott Moehring
        moehrings@alltel.net

        Comment


        • #5
          Could you elaborate?

          Scott... could you elaborate or give some examples of how you define your projects?

          I seem to be having trouble. Past tense implies a verb... but you say to use a noun?

          Comment


          • #6
            I do exactly the same things Scott does. Outcomes would be something like:
            Piano has been tuned.
            House has been painted.
            Skipper has learned to "stay".

            Notice the sentences begin with nouns. The verbs are all past tense. I can look at each of those sentences and label it as either "true" or "false." If it's true, I can check off the projects as "done." If it's false, I need a next action.

            Frank

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Frank Buck
              House has been painted.
              Skipper has learned to "stay".

              Notice the sentences begin with nouns. The verbs are all past tense. I can look at each of those sentences and label it as either "true" or "false."
              I prefer present tense to past, but the effect is much the same:

              Backup process is tested, trustworthy, fully supported, and monitored daily.
              Camper shell is in place and useable.
              The trailer has tire covers.

              Comment


              • #8
                Nouns vs. Verbs

                I actually start my project descriptions with verbs rather than nouns. I've found that this holds my focus on the project better. It also forces me to visualize wild success as a step separate from naming the project. So for each of my projects, I try to have crafted a statement similar to the project names that Frank and Ambar use. My project name will be something like "Replace kitchen sink." For each of those I try to have a wild-success outcome like "I love using my perfectly installed stainless-steel kitchen sink so much that dishes never pile up."

                Here's a list of project verbs, which I compiled from various lists on this site and I think from the book (it's long):

                Acquire
                Activate
                Adjust
                Administer
                Apply
                Approve
                Arrange
                Assemble
                Assist
                Attain
                Brainstorm
                Budget
                Build
                Buy
                Catalogue
                Clarify
                Classify
                Compile
                Complete
                Conduct
                Consolidate
                Control
                Coordinate
                Create
                Define
                Deliver
                Demonstrate
                Design
                Develop
                Diagnose
                Direct
                Eliminate
                Empower
                Enlist
                Ensure
                Establish
                Finalize
                Find
                Finish
                Forecast
                Gain
                Generate
                Guard
                Handle
                Head
                Hire
                Identify
                Implement
                Improve
                Increase
                Index
                Inform
                Install
                Interpret
                Interview
                Introduce
                Invent
                Launch
                Lead
                Learn
                Look Into
                Maintain
                Manage
                Maximize
                Merge
                Minimize
                Modulate
                Motivate
                Negotiate
                Observe
                Obtain
                Operate
                Optimize
                Organize
                Outline
                Oversee
                Own
                Participate
                Perform
                Persuade
                Plan
                Prepare
                Present
                Produce
                Program
                Propose
                Publish
                Publish
                Recommend
                Release
                Render
                Renegotiate
                Renovate
                Reorganize
                Repair
                Report
                Research
                Resolve
                Review
                Revise
                Roll Out
                Secure
                Select
                Sell
                Send
                Set Up
                Setup
                Simplify
                Solve
                Sort
                Stimulate
                Stop
                Store
                Streamline
                Strengthen
                Structure
                Submit
                Summarize
                Systematize
                Teach
                Test
                Train
                Understand
                Update
                Use
                Write


                Kudos to the original providers of these, whoever they are!

                Comment


                • #9
                  That's a great list for NAs. I find my NAs much easier to leap at when they begin with verbs.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X