Forum

  • If you are new to these Forums, please take a moment to register using the fields above.

Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

NAs that don't necessarily fall into a single context

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • NAs that don't necessarily fall into a single context

    Hi all,

    I have a question. Although majority of my NAs fall into some categories, there are some that don't.

    For example, I would work in my lab and also at home. Surely housework falls into @Home, while experiments/labwork falls into @Lab. I am also taking classes, so I have readings, homework, papers, projects. All of these I don't have to do it at home or at lab; although some of these need computer and I can route to @computer, but it is only a very minor portion (it's also derailing not to have all my class-related work at the same place)

    Currently, my workaround is a @CourseWork category. Whenever I want to do something about my class/course related work, I consult the list and make decisions. This work for a certain extent, but certainly is not as ideal a hard-landscape in GTD; the over all hard edges between my contexts are compromised.

    Another alternative is to view the whole "coursework" as a giant half-year project, then break it into subproject as usual. However, it's not the normal way I handle my coursework. I subconsciously become reluctant to follow all the couseload leads scattered into different projects, and my mind will go numb.

    May I know if you guys have similar questions and got it resolved? Like you have NAs that don't fall right into a context? Thanks a lot!!

  • #2
    I use contexts like @Read and Review or @Write for this kind of item. That is, I've defined these contexts as states of mind rather than physical location.

    Katherine

    Comment


    • #3
      I only have two contexts - work and personal.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by kewms View Post
        I use contexts like @Read and Review or @Write for this kind of item. That is, I've defined these contexts as states of mind rather than physical location.
        Katherine
        I have these contexts too. However, in contrast to those like @Read, when the "tools" you need is just the reading material, @CourseWork may need a greater diversity of things specifically for different items (eg. Quantum mechanics book for reading a book, computer for browsing course syllabus, calculators for computations, tables for references...etc.)

        What I mean is, I prefer, as you said, define @CourseWork as a state of mind, but there are more practical complexities.
        While it's also possible to spread all these into individual contexts like @Computer, @Read/Review, @Home... I strongly prefer centrally managing all the coursework.

        The current setup works to a certain extent, provided the compromise in hard edges may be less evil.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Campion View Post
          I have these contexts too. However, in contrast to those like @Read, when the "tools" you need is just the reading material, @CourseWork may need a greater diversity of things specifically for different items (eg. Quantum mechanics book for reading a book, computer for browsing course syllabus, calculators for computations, tables for references...etc.)

          What I mean is, I prefer, as you said, define @CourseWork as a state of mind, but there are more practical complexities.
          *shrug* Whatever works for you is fine. I just thought the point of your post was that it isn't working.

          Katherine

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by kewms View Post
            *shrug* Whatever works for you is fine. I just thought the point of your post was that it isn't working.
            Katherine
            Yup. Indeed. Sorry about the confusion.

            It works to some extents, but seems not the GTD ideal. I believe long-term GTDers like you and others must know of more optimized way, which I cannot come up with myself. Thanks

            Comment


            • #7
              Contexts are imperfect. Pick or create a context that works.

              Sometimes, if I have something that can be done in different contexts, I just pick one.

              Comment


              • #8
                Checklist?

                Originally posted by Campion View Post
                Currently, my workaround is a @CourseWork category. Whenever I want to do something about my class/course related work, I consult the list and make decisions. This work for a certain extent, but certainly is not as ideal a hard-landscape in GTD; the over all hard edges between my contexts are compromised.
                Simlpy rename your course-work-list (that causes you problems) your 'CourseWork Checklist' for your daily 'CourseWork Event'.

                Whenever that context concept (@office etc) doesn't work for me I just change that list that bugs me into a checklist for a certain purpose.

                Rainer

                Comment


                • #9
                  Remember that contexts are optional. I usually recommend starting simple - just a few, then let your needs emerge. I went from the six "turnkey" ones through a few iterations. Now I just have "Actions" and "Errands." I don't have a lot of regular meetings, so my "Agendas" context doesn't get used much.

                  It also depends on how many actions you have...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    might not be a context problem per se

                    Keeping up with course work can require time that is set aside for that and only that, so you identify the time and place and hard landscape it. So yes it is a context but it is more. You need to portest that time. Study sessions for most people will need to be at least 2 hours, but there is variation and many people like larger blocks as it takes time to settle in and get into the deeper thinking modes. Although I don't have a love for the Covey methods, they do suggest that you think of some things as "big rocks" and put them in your "aquarium" and then put the smaller rocks and plants around them. Study time, may always be a big rock. However, review and research might be aportioned through various contexts without specific times. Good luck!

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X