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Wired Magazine feature on David Allen

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  • Wired Magazine feature on David Allen

    I never read Wired magazine. I don't subscribe to it but it's delivered to me nonetheless. I suppose that way they can claim a high circulation.

    For some odd reason, today I flipped through the current issue and there is a story on David Allen. It describes his heroin addiction, institutionalization at a mental hospital, and subsequent dedication to John-Roger (aka the Mystical Traveler).

    The author looks to history to find some intellectual precedents and influences for GTD. Then, with a reference to the famous sociologist Norbert Elias, he speculates that in the future we might no more imagine not doing GTD, than today we could imagine not using eating utensils.

    I found his comments intriguing, since I have made similar analogies myself.

    I imagine the article will be posted for all to read at some point. It's worth a look by those of us who live by GTD.

  • #2
    I did not find an article such as you describe in the current (September) issue of Wired, nor did I find it on the Wired web site. Citation, please?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by mcogilvie View Post
      I did not find an article such as you describe in the current (September) issue of Wired, nor did I find it on the Wired web site. Citation, please?
      It's in the October issue. I just picked it up today. It's a pretty good article. It goes into David's past a little, but doesn't get too sensationalistic or judgmental about it.

      It's got, of course, the typical "elevator pitch" summary of GTD. (Reasonably well-done as those things go.)

      And in what (I guess) is typical Wired style, the writer ruminates on what GTD means in a larger sociological sense, why GTD has become so popular with techies, and what the future of GTD might be.

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      • #4
        David Allen's past

        This isn't new information. David Allen has been open about his past in previous interviews, and you can find some of those old articles on the internet. It has also been mentioned in the past on this forum. I work in the mental health field, and I love hearing stories about people who have had major difficulties at some point in their lives and have been able to grow past them.

        I'm glad that he found his "calling," if you will, and finally shared his knowledge with a broader audience. Many of us don't work for companies that bring him in for seminars, and/or can't afford to attend one that is open to the public.

        I look forward to the next video or audio product that will be available to the public. If I can afford it, you can bet that I will be buying it. I have listened to the GTD Fast CDs many times, and usually find a new nugget of information each time.

        David Allen, if you ever visit these forums, please know that I thank you for all you have shared with us. GTD has been a positive contribution to my own life experience.

        Carolyn

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        • #5
          I always remember a line from a play which seems relevant:

          "I wouldn't trust anyone who didn't trust themselves to get drunk"

          Obviously heroin is an extreme but I am wary of people who haven't explored their edges - especially when they start telling me what to do. I wasn't aware of this story but I think if anything it adds to David's credibility and maybe explains the warmth and humanity that comes across so strongly.

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          • #6
            Hey, folks... thanks for your replies...and...

            I was a bit disappointed that Gary Wolf (the author of the Wired article) rather tackily framed my early adventures and explorations, as well as the work of John-Roger, in such a People-magazine-ish light. There's a bit of intellectual dishonesty in not exploring the content of what I learned in the process, nor examining what J-R actually teaches. And that was almost 40 years ago. Good grief. But what the heck. I think he did an admirable job of catching some of the profundity of what the GTD thought process is, and might be, relative to the next level of awareness required in our culture....

            David

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            • #7
              Originally posted by DavidAllen View Post
              exploring the content of what I learned in the process
              Well, at least I don't have to buy the magazine then. I would love to read more about the psychological wisdom behind GTD, how it works, where it comes from. It's what I find most interesting about GTD (besides just doing it). What is it that helped you to create a fabulous life?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Cpu_Modern View Post
                I would love to read more about the psychological wisdom behind GTD, how it works, where it comes from. It's what I find most interesting about GTD (besides just doing it). What is it that helped you to create a fabulous life?
                Then you would love David's other book --- Ready for Anything: 52 Productivity Principles for Work and Life. It explains a lot of the reasons why GTD just works.

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                • #9
                  This article is up on the web now, here, for anybody who's still curious.

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                  • #10
                    David is too much of a gentleman...

                    Just read Wolf's "story": it's a slam job, pure and simple. I don't know why Wolf decided to try and smear Allen's professional reputation and standing, except this sort of drive-by journalism has become Wired's breathless stock in trade.

                    David is too polite to say it, so I will (and did at http://www.todoorelse.com/2007/10/slam-job.html): Wolf did a smear job and and should be fired.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Bob Walsh View Post
                      Just read Wolf's "story": it's a slam job, pure and simple. I don't know why Wolf decided to try and smear Allen's professional reputation and standing, except this sort of drive-by journalism has become Wired's breathless stock in trade.

                      David is too polite to say it, so I will (and did at http://www.todoorelse.com/2007/10/slam-job.html): Wolf did a smear job and and should be fired.
                      I haven't taken Wired seriously since before the dot-com bust. They abandoned all pretense of being countercultural when they put Bill Gates on the cover, and they proved they'd lost their technical savvy when they declared push technology the Next Big Thing.

                      Katherine

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                      • #12
                        Clear you personal mental filter and do not write posts in anger.

                        Originally posted by Bob Walsh View Post
                        Just read Wolf's "story": it's a slam job, pure and simple. I don't know why Wolf decided to try and smear Allen's professional reputation and standing, except this sort of drive-by journalism has become Wired's breathless stock in trade.

                        David is too polite to say it, so I will (and did at http://www.todoorelse.com/2007/10/slam-job.html): Wolf did a smear job and and should be fired.
                        I am the GTD fan but I have not found the Wired article to be offensive. I do not think your rant is appropriate. Clear you personal mental filter and do not write posts in anger.

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