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GTD for College Professors

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  • GTD for College Professors

    I'm interested in seeing if there are any other academics interested in using GTD. I'm committed to begin this process, but wonder what the experience of other college professors has been. I'm chair of a small college English department and typically feel overwhelmed by all the minutiae of administration, to say nothing of teaching classes, doing research, and attempting some semblance of personal life. So, any advice would be helpful.

  • #2
    Advice/Help for GTD & Academics

    Here is my list of six unique difficulties that face academics trying to learn and implement GTD. Just scroll to the bottom of the page and click on the "GTD & Academics" posting.

    I was actually introduced to GTD by a former professor of mine and subsequently ended up writing my own GTD program for the mac as well as a text-to-speech script I used to help me get through my comprehensive exams.

    It takes somewhere between 1-2 years to really master the GTD habits; but once you do, things really start to move.
    Last edited by Todd V; 08-08-2012, 01:32 PM.

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    • #3
      Todd V, thanks for the helpful download. I'm going to process the things you've written here, all of which are extremely helpful. The first action in this process is to do an inventory of what's on my plate right now. That's more or less my version of the projects list. Then I can begin to move on from there.

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      • #4
        That's great Todd.

        Under energy I would add in the effort involved in giving a lecture particularly a large lower level lecture say 200 students in first year in a service course they don't particularly want to do. (eg first year mathematics to engineering students). A large part of such lecturing is putting on a theatrical performance and consumes an enormous amount of energy.

        Regards - Michael

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        • #5
          I don't really have anything to add personally to this, but just wanted to touch base and let you know that the forums over at 43folders.com have had a few really good discussions on GTD in Academia.

          HTH,

          Adam

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          • #6
            I've found that faculty face tremendous challenges in self-management. As you pointed out, faculty (esp. deans) in addition to administration must manage research, teaching, service, etc. They're essentially entrepreneurs.

            I've worked with a number of faculty who've taken it up. One member said it's the single best practice one could adopt to help with success.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by masonte View Post
              I'm interested in seeing if there are any other academics interested in using GTD. I'm committed to begin this process, but wonder what the experience of other college professors has been. I'm chair of a small college English department and typically feel overwhelmed by all the minutiae of administration, to say nothing of teaching classes, doing research, and attempting some semblance of personal life. So, any advice would be helpful.
              I very quickly grasped the ideas of GTD, but have struggled with various implementation issues. The natural division of academic life into research, teaching, and administrative creates strong biases in priorities. The cycles of teaching creates a basic rhythm in which research and admin have to fit. But research is consuming and admin is distractive, so they tend to interfere with each other. I think a conscious emphasis on balance has not worked well for me. On the other hand, a more gtd-ish emphasis on collection, next actions and rapid dispatch does give me the confidence that small things are moving ahead so I can focus on bigger projects. One of the ways I can tell that I feel good about the overall balance is when I can patiently deal with the emotional needs of others. Presence in the moment is something I only have if the runway stuff is under control.

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              • #8
                Thanks Todd

                Your comment that it takes 1-2 years to really get the GTD system working well actually gives me hope. I've been struggling with it off and on (off at this time of year, when term papers and exams almost overwhelm research and family time, and on at the beginning of the term when my calendar looks like there is plenty of space to get everything done). Knowing that it will take me another year sort of puts a deadline on the learning curve and encourages me to keep working at getting the system in place.

                Rachel

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