Forum

  • If you are new to these Forums, please take a moment to register using the fields above.
Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Trying to understand lists of actions Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    kabell wrote, "In GTD the single most important task is to have all your inboxes empty, and all your lists complete."

    I disagree. I don't think GTD has one single most important task. What about GTD freeing you to think strategically about your work? Isn't that more important?

    Comment


    • #47
      Originally posted by kabell View Post
      Yes, your kitchen sink is an inbox, and you should empty it as often as possible.
      Including the kitchen sink...

      Even your outbox, if you have one, is an inbox for filing. When I had asked on this forum if it was alright to use an outbox, so that I don't have to get up after every piece was processed, I was told by some that the outbox is really only an inbox. Just that symbolic suggestion had a great impact on me.

      I like the idea of treating all these household areas as inboxes. If your bedroom is covered in your clothes, that looks like one big inbox. Time to process. That may also be a good reason to not just drop things where they are, but to put as much away as possible. Now I know this is not possible all the time - just look at my bedroom when I'm getting ready for a big event - but mentally this must help.

      Another example is the snail mail. You pull it from your mailbox (inbox) and place it in your home in a stack, preferably in your household inbox. But, if you instead place the stack of mail on your foyer table, wouldn't that now be an inbox?

      Comment


      • #48
        Right

        Originally posted by Brent View Post
        kabell wrote, "In GTD the single most important task is to have all your inboxes empty, and all your lists complete."

        I disagree. I don't think GTD has one single most important task. What about GTD freeing you to think strategically about your work? Isn't that more important?
        I guess you're right - it's language barriers here. What I meant is, that the single most important goal (this is valid, at least for me) is to have every commitment down on paper, so they aren't messing with your head. This will of course lead to better focus and thereby better productivity, but to achieve this, everything needs to be in a trusted system.

        As David said somewhere (paraphrased): Having 95% of all your commitments down on paper, compared to 100%, is small in numbers, but it's a whole different world in terms of how you feel.

        Comment


        • #49
          Originally posted by kabell View Post
          What I meant is, that the single most important goal (this is valid, at least for me) is to have every commitment down on paper, so they aren't messing with your head.
          And even there, I disagree. I think the weekly review is even more important, as lots of people have tried getting everything out of their head, and within a few weeks are faced with an out-of-date, out-of-control monster of a system.

          I think a consistent weekly review can fix an incomplete, broken system. But a complete, broken system won't work without regular reviews.

          I suspect we're in violent agreement.

          Anyway, back to inboxes. Yes, a foundational productivity pillar is emptying your inboxes frequently. It's certainly a learned skill; folks aren't born knowing this stuff.

          Comment

          Working...
          X