Forum

  • If you are new to these Forums, please take a moment to register using the fields above.
Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
"synchronizing" schedules Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • "synchronizing" schedules

    I am been using @adgenda and @waiting for in regard to giving 4 people with whom I work information about dates and activites, and getting a response. back from them. But this is way to cumbersome for the amount of information I need to have go back and forth on a daily, weekly, and as needed basis. Sometimes 7 people are involved.

    I need a way to note that I have given this information to each person and when I did it. I need to verify that they have received it.

    In turn they need to do certain things:

    1. They need to record the info accurately and in a retrievable/viewable way.

    2. They need to let me know if there are any conflicts. Some of their information comes from announcements and some from computer, and often they don't check or record.

    3. They need to let me know about any lead time matters I am involved in in (equipment, supplies, transportation, preparation that I need to arrange).

    4. I need to get all this information back from them when I have a calendar in front of me so I can record it and see if ther are conflicts with anything to which I am already committed.

    5. I need to know what I have already told them so that when there is a change or an addition I don't go through everything. This is critical for me, so I don't waste my time and can move them towards high levels of responsibility.

    6. Sometimes I can meet with everyone at once and sometimes not.

    I need to know that they have done so 1,2, and 3.

    They need to know that I have done 4.

    Here are some aspects of the situation:

    One has e-mail and says he wants to do this by e-mail. But it takes me 5 to 10 minutes per item to write out who, what, when, why, etc.. and then I have read and respond to his e-mails, etc.

    Two don't check e-mail reliably.

    There are frequent changes.


    I think that 2x weekly planning meetings work best. They sometimes show up with either no planner or they have not entered everything into it.

    I use Palm handheld and a desk top version and then I also write everything on a paper calendar. I can't always remeber if I have updated it since changes come up at odd times and may get entered in the Palm first, but occasionally on the paper calendar if there is complex scheduling where I have to see a lot at once. Printing our from Palm is a problem because things change a lot.

    One that also helps is that I also keep a whole year reference calender on the wall that shows major things like holidays, and critical deadlines, and vacations.

    I would appreciate any suggestions!

    Thanks, Jamie

  • #2
    Isn't this kind of thing why electronic calendars exist?

    You post item to shared calendar. Calendar software notifies affected individuals, and provides tools they can use to accept the item as is or provide feedback. Calendar software keeps track of confirmations so that you can followup as necessary. It's all electronic, so you can automatically create and file copies of everything for reference when needed.

    The only issue is the two people who don't check email reliably. If they are subordinates, as your note implies, it seems to me that it's their job to make sure they are current, not yours to pester them. Similarly, coming to the planning meeting without a current planner is just rude and shouldn't be tolerated.

    I'm no fan of Outlook, but stuff like this is why companies love it so.

    Katherine

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Jamie Elis View Post
      Here are some aspects of the situation:

      One has e-mail and says he wants to do this by e-mail. But it takes me 5 to 10 minutes per item to write out who, what, when, why, etc.. and then I have read and respond to his e-mails, etc.

      Two don't check e-mail reliably.

      There are frequent changes.


      I think that 2x weekly planning meetings work best. They sometimes show up with either no planner or they have not entered everything into it.
      Are you the boss, or a coworker?

      If you are the boss, then make these things mandatory. Include it in their annual performance appraisals and make it important to their salary adjustments each year. Set a standard for professional behavior and enforce it.

      If not, then the best you can do is lead by example. If the situation is really bad, then perhaps consider dropping $50 on four copies of GTD, put bows on them, and leave them on your coworkers desks with an anonymous note: "This changed my life; I hope it helps you too".

      Comment


      • #4
        thank you

        I will look into electronic calendar.

        We are a team of peers with different but somehwat overlapping duties, and supposed to take a leaderhsip role in whatever we need to to get them done.

        They think they can write information down on any old piece of paper and it will work for them, even when they are running into a lot of "I forgots". Also, they get certain assignments via several websites. They don't collect this in one place and hence don't see conflicts and collisions. What's in it for them to stay in this mode? Having to deal with their emergencies , brought on by their own inefficiency and unwillingness to look at their "methods", enables them to avoid doing things they don't like.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Jamie Elis View Post
          They think they can write information down on any old piece of paper and it will work for them, even when they are running into a lot of "I forgots". Also, they get certain assignments via several websites. They don't collect this in one place and hence don't see conflicts and collisions. What's in it for them to stay in this mode? Having to deal with their emergencies , brought on by their own inefficiency and unwillingness to look at their "methods", enables them to avoid doing things they don't like.


          Is there a way for you to work around them? For instance, if this is work that they would delegate to their subordinates anyway, can you work with the subordinates directly? (Being infinitely polite, of course... "I know you're so busy, Bob, I'd be happy to work directly with Patty on this...")

          Can you appeal to a higher authority, such as a mutual boss? This is likely to be more effective if subtle: emphasize how helpful and organized some of your colleagues are, but somehow Bob's part of the project just isn't moving forward...

          Can you pass the buck? This is a more direct version of the appeal to authority, in which you clearly document all the ways in which you have asked them to contribute, and then simply ask Bob (in front of witnesses), "so how is your part of the FrozzBozz Report coming along?" If this happens often enough, he'll figure out that getting organized (or at least prioritizing your stuff) is the only way to avoid public humiliation. (Or else he'll slip cyanide into your coffee...)

          In any case, documentation is key. Keeping a good record of what they've agreed to is the only way to hold them accountable for it.

          Good luck!

          Katherine

          Comment


          • #6
            you got it!

            All of these things you mention I have done, but just not effective on an ongoing basis.

            I think the documentation part is really what is critical.

            Comment

            Working...
            X