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  • Having two "at computer" buckets? (1 urgent, 1 can wait)

    Is it good practise to have 2 "at computer" lists of next actions?

    Since I do so much at the computer, I like to put the hot, urgent or important next actions in "at computer 1" and the ones that can be done at a lower priority in "at computer 2".

    Is there a better way to do what I'm trying to accomplish? Is this an established need or is there a recommended methodology?

    Is there a recommended terminology to use, so I don't have to use 1 and 2?

    Sonja

  • #2
    The original GTD never says you mark actions with priority; priority is something which you decide on the fly by looking at the lists. But some people, including me, find it convenient to separate out urgent actions. This may be something between the "hard landscape" (the calendar) and other actions. ("I better do these before everything else.") As far as the categories you make reflect (and keep up to) what you think, they are fine. (sufficiently regular review is the key.) In a way you do not want to think twice about which actions are better done before everything else, which is really in line with GTD: there is no reason to have a thought twice unless you like that thought.

    Regards,
    Abhay

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Sonja Elen Kisa View Post
      Is it good practise to have 2 "at computer" lists of next actions?
      Well I have several @computer lists, for example:

      PC offline (when I need my laptop but not an internet connection)
      Online
      Web surfing (for really low energy times)

      I think the key is to find contexts that work for you, and create lists that attract you when you look at them in the right context.

      - Don

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      • #4
        Use the Someday / Maybe LIST !!

        I think one of the biggest benefits I have gotten from joining GTD Connect is FINALLY understanding the power of the "Someday Maybe" List & the "weekly Review".

        If u feel that your @Computer next action list is too long or contains "UN-important" items that u will no way be able to do in the next week...then U SHOULD MOVE THEM TO UR SOMEDAY / MAYBE @Computer LIST !

        But this will ONLY work if ur mind can trust that u will have a look @ that someday maybe @computer list ...next week in ur weekly Review.

        Try it !! It will reduce ur stress..guaranteed !!

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        • #5
          So you're saying if it's not something I can do in the next week or 2 and it's more of a "do it in 3 or 4 weeks" next action, then I should file it in "some day, maybe" and then review the "some day, maybe" list every week (or maybe once a month, like when I review my "long-term goals" list?).

          Sonja

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Sonja Elen Kisa View Post
            So you're saying if it's not something I can do in the next week or 2 and it's more of a "do it in 3 or 4 weeks" next action, then I should file it in "some day, maybe" and then review the "some day, maybe" list every week (or maybe once a month, like when I review my "long-term goals" list?).

            Sonja
            Anything you are not doing in the next few weeks is probably best in a someday/maybe file. You can put a note in your tickler to start a particular project or task 4 weeks from now for example. Some on this forum have both a someday and a maybe list. I have s/m lists that are broken down into a few lists, such as items to read, marketing, etc. What works best for me to manage all this is the weekly review, during which I have to review and update the s/m lists or else I feel a bit lost the following week.

            On another note I have 2 @computer lists, but not as in urgent and non-urgent. Mine are @pc for standard computer stuff and @program on which I have more complex activities.

            To manage my urgent or important or dead-line driven tasks is by recording due dates, using the tickler, scheduling time, and also daily making a short focus list (nothing formal or written in stone) of what I'll be working on that day. I'm also extremely aware of what I have on my NA lists and my project list. Like you I'm working on my long-term goals, but probably unlike you, I'm behind on keeping them up-to-date. Maybe that should be on my active project list.

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            • #7
              To provide some real-world examples:

              My Projects list currently contains 6 items, all of which I plan/hope to finish this week. I have 10 Next Actions (some of them came from Tickler reminders, and aren't full-scale Projects, such as "Change all clocks in house to atomic time").

              I currently have 164 items in my Someday/Maybe list.

              Last night, I got inspired by some videos of the TED conference, and thought up a topic for a series of blog posts. I put that new idea on my Someday/Maybe list, not on my list of Projects. I have other active Projects that I'm working on right now. I'll get back to that idea on Sunday during my Weekly Review, when I can decide if it's worth working on, but I'm not going to compromise my current work load.

              I've solved the problem described by sorting the items in one list: creative projects go at the top of the list, and non-creative ones at the bottom. If I'm feeling creative, I know to look near the top of the list. But--and I think this is important--they're all in the same list, so I'm evaluating them all at once.

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