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  • Two questions - regular actions and ongoing "projects"

    Hi everyone, I'm new to GTD and I would like to know your thoughts on actions that must be done regularly, such as meditation or exercise or piano practice or checking the mail - should you create new next action lists marked "Daily" and "weekly" and not cross items off these lists when you've done them? How would you differentiate these actions from "one-time" next actions?

    My second question is about project lists - I have set up different project lists for "short term", "long term", as well as "ongoing projects" - the last one isn't really a list of projects as such, but ongoing commitments that don't have a tangible goal in sight where I can say "finished". Am I on the right track or is there a more efficient way to do this?

    Thanks in advance!
    Last edited by earthfriend; 07-02-2008, 07:38 PM.

  • #2
    Create daily/weekly/monthly/yearly checklists.

    Create daily/weekly/monthly/yearly checklists. Do not clutter NA lists with recurring actions.

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    • #3
      thoughts on actions that must be done regularly

      I like to distinguish between future habits and maintenance work. Future habits is a constant battle. There are always habits I want to improve on. Maybe this is the essence of life with ambition > 0. I have a list with all those future habits and conquer it one habit at a time. An article I'd liked to have recommended.

      Maintenance work is about things where really, really no improvement is the goal. Like taking out the trash. The perfect situation / successful outcome is already there: I have a trashcan I like. I put these on a checklist the way and the why TesTeq already mentioned.


      ongoing commitments that don't have a tangible goal

      Can you mention an example? Many of these commitments serve indeed a goal. Maybe this is a long term 30,000 ft thing. Maybe it is smart to invent a tangible goal as form of motivation if you will.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by earthfriend View Post
        Hi everyone, I'm new to GTD and I would like to know your thoughts on actions that must be done regularly, such as meditation or exercise or piano practice or checking the mail - should you create new next action lists marked "Daily" and "weekly" and not cross items off these lists when you've done them? How would you differentiate these actions from "one-time" next actions?
        I have a separate checklist for daily habits, and weekly tickler items for weekly habits (on different days of the week).

        My second question is about project lists - I have set up different project lists for "short term", "long term", as well as "ongoing projects" - the last one isn't really a list of projects as such, but ongoing commitments that don't have a tangible goal in sight where I can say "finished". Am I on the right track or is there a more efficient way to do this?
        My short-term projects go on my Projects list. Long-term projects go on my Someday/Maybe list, as they're not done yet (but will be done Someday). As Cpu_Modern asks, could you provide some examples of ongoing commitments with no tangible goal, that don't have regular habits associated with them?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by earthfriend View Post
          ... thoughts on actions that must be done regularly, such as meditation or exercise or piano practice or checking the mail

          .... ongoing commitments that don't have a tangible goal in sight where I can say "finished".
          The regular recurring stuff can be a challenge in a paper-based system. These sorts of activities can often be handled by an electronic system better.

          The "commitments that don't have a tangible goal in sight" sound more like "areas of responsibility" in the GTD system. You may want to read up on horizons of focus or the "vertical" aspect of GTD.

          - Don

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          • #6
            Originally posted by dschaffner View Post
            The regular recurring stuff can be a challenge in a paper-based system. These sorts of activities can often be handled by an electronic system better.
            On the other hand, the tickler and paper-based checklists can work just as well as an electronic system.

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