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implementation using outlook

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  • implementation using outlook

    I'm having some trouble implementing this process with outlook. First of all, how are tasks treated? Are they simply your one step to-do things? Are they your next actions?

    When you sub-categorize your next actions, i.e., @computer, what is that? Is "@" used as some computer languate or just as a tag? How does all of that work together?

    Also, how are projects treated? Some say they are listed as contacts.

    Lastly, I like to plan my day and print up a calendar to take with me while I'm out. Once I have gone through the task list and determined which tasks I want to accomplish on that day, how do I get those particular tasks to show up on the calendar?


    I'm just having a lot of trouble visualizing how this is suppose to look. I would very much appreciate any help you can give me.

    Thank you,

    ron

  • #2
    Hi Ron,

    There is a white paper available by David Allen Co. that describes how to set Outlook up for use with GTD, and quite a bit of the theory of GTD as well. It is available for purchase on this website and I do recommend it.

    Scot

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    • #3
      Outlook info...

      Originally posted by CSGiles
      Hi Ron,

      There is a white paper available by David Allen Co. that describes how to set Outlook up for use with GTD, and quite a bit of the theory of GTD as well. It is available for purchase on this website and I do recommend it.

      Scot

      Here 'tis...

      http://www.davidco.com/productDetail...amp;IDoption=9

      Comment


      • #4
        I'm having some trouble implementing this process with outlook. First of all, how are tasks treated? Are they simply your one step to-do things? Are they your next actions?
        Tasks are both one-step AND n/a's. Some of my tasks are single action items and others are tied to Projects.

        When you sub-categorize your next actions, i.e., @computer, what is that? Is "@" used as some computer languate or just as a tag? How does all of that work together?
        The @ does two things for me: 1. It designates in what context my actions will happen, i.e. where, how, etc. Simply it could be thought of as 'at', at computer, at home. 2. The '@' symbol keeps those categories at the top of your lists in outlook for convenience.

        Also, how are projects treated? Some say they are listed as contacts.
        As per Bill Kratz's method and new 'contact as project' template, my projects are under a contact folder. Tasks, notes, dates, etc. are linked to each project: Actions menu.

        Lastly, I like to plan my day and print up a calendar to take with me while I'm out. Once I have gone through the task list and determined which tasks I want to accomplish on that day, how do I get those particular tasks to show up on the calendar?
        To keep this short, using filters in your task views you can filter to view just tasks to be done on a particular day. When you print within Outlook, say in a weekly style, do PageSetup, look under Options for Task Pad and check the box. It lists your tasks on the right side of your calendar.

        All this is in that GTD Outlook pdf file everyone's talking about. If your just beginning this, my humble opinion is that spending the $ for the Outlook Add-In is a little premature. Just try the paper first. Then 'upgrade' if you feel you need it.

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        • #5
          Implementation

          Thank you, each one.

          ron

          Comment


          • #6
            I wouldn't buy both ...

            Listed right on the download page is: "The information contained in this document is included in the Outlook Add-in product. We recommend the Implementing David Allen's Workflow Processing Using Microsoft Outlook document for those people who want to manually reconfigure the Outlook settings. If you prefer an automatic reconfiguration, please see the Outlook Add in."

            I personally would recommend getting the add-in, using it and thoroughly absorbing the PDF material that comes with it FIRST. It really helps to get you up and running without spending too much time on configuration. If you want to manipulate Outlook further after your in the habit of implementing the basics, it's easy to do from that point.

            - just my opinion

            Wynelle

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            • #7
              My expectations!

              My experience with Implementing David Allen's Workflow Processing Using Microsoft Outlook is as follows:

              I first downloaded the trial Add-On software and had few issues with implementing it. One problem was when I clicked by mistake on one of the main fields at the top of my @Action list and changed the "View" setting, I was unable to bring it back. I spent good hour trying and trying but no results (that included go to reset the view again from the GTD software, catagorizing by project or context, etc).

              Anyway, I read the same comments you listed up here about "Implementing David Allen's Workflow Processing Using Microsoft Outlook"which states "Ideal for those who need to manually reconfigure Outlook. For an automatic reconfiguration, please see the Outlook Add-in product above"

              Well, since I consider myself a learning Geek, I thought I will buy the PDF manual configruation and do the setting myself what the software does.

              I was very happy with the paper and instruction BUT it did not have all the information needed to set OUTLOOK the way the software does!! My expection was to be able to set myself manually the buttons called "Defere, Delegate, etc" and also instruction on how to set the mail folders called "@Action, @Waiting for, etc" but that instruction was NOT included!

              so, now I will have to buy the Add-On anyway because there is no Instruction to set them manually.

              Can anybody let me know if I missed something? Thanks

              Comment


              • #8
                The add-in is indispensable for me

                The GTD add-in is an indispensable part of my Outlook-centric workflow. I used the PDF document prior to the add-in's initial release and it got me part of the way towards a really effective GTD workflow. But the add-in makes processing my inputs, especially e-mails and tasks, a much easier (and more gratifying) activity.

                I know that a software investment is truly valuable when, for one reason or another, I'm forced to do without it. While waiting for the add-in to be updated to work properly with Outlook 2003, I was forced to uninstall it completely at one point due to the number of program errors I was encountering. I rapidly came to appreciate how much I had come to rely on the ability to attach both a project and context designation to every information object.

                Those issues have been addressed by the most recent update. If you "live in Outlook" all day long, I consider the add-in to be required equipment - every bit as much a labeler and supply of new folders.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Implementation in outlook - Projects as Contacts

                  Where can I find more information about this "project as contacts template"?

                  As per Bill Kratz's method and new 'contact as project' template, my projects are under a contact folder. Tasks, notes, dates, etc. are linked to each project: Actions menu.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Implementation in outlook - Projects as Contacts

                    Originally posted by netheadred
                    Where can I find more information about this "project as contacts template"?

                    As per Bill Kratz's method and new 'contact as project' template, my projects are under a contact folder. Tasks, notes, dates, etc. are linked to each project: Actions menu.

                    Try this: http://home.comcast.net/~whkratz/id3.htm.

                    His main site is;: http://home.comcast.net/~whkratz/index.htm

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Bill Kratz web site and other links

                      Bill's web site is: http://home.comcast.net/~whkratz/index.htm

                      He has a lot of great information but it has not been updated in some time. Bill was a very active participant in the GTD add-in forums and suddenly stopped posting. I'm not sure if this is due to abandoning GTD (doubtful) or due to personal issues.

                      If you do a search on the GTD add-in forum for "contacts as projects" and "William Kratz" as the author you can pick up a lot of context.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: My expectations!

                        Originally posted by Ali_Issa

                        so, now I will have to buy the Add-On anyway because there is no Instruction to set them manually.

                        Can anybody let me know if I missed something? Thanks
                        Hi, try this address:

                        http://gtdsupport.netcentrics.com/kb...asp?id=GTD0100

                        Also, per the support site's faq, this is the difference between the document with the program and the document purchased separately:

                        Article Title: What is the difference between the Getting Things Done Outlook Add-In and The Implementing David Allen's Workflow Processing Using Microsoft Outlook document?

                        Article Number: FAQ0004

                        Article Text: <snip>

                        The Implementing David Allen's Workflow Processing Using Microsoft Outlook document is included in the Getting Things Done Outlook Add-In help file under Delving Deeper. It has been edited to remove the sections pertaining to things that are automatically done in the Add-In (setting up views, for example) and enhanced in some areas to describe how to use additional information provided by the Add-In.

                        If you previously implemented the method described in Implementing David Allen's Workflow Processing Using Microsoft Outlook, you may incorporate the Tasks into the Add-In using the Update Action Tasks button on the Options page. See the Getting Things Done help file Preferences\Administrative Settings\Update Task Actions topic or the Update Task Actions section of knowledge base article GTD0100 Administration.

                        Last Updated: 10/30/2002 4:52:06 PM

                        (site for the faq: http://gtdsupport.netcentrics.com/kb...asp?id=FAQ0004)

                        Sheryl

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