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  • Leveraging GTD to gain competitive advantage

    Has anyone leveraged the fact that they practice the GTD methodology to gain a competitive advantage either for job interviews, promotion within existing organisation etc and how did you communicate or demonstrate it to people that may not work with you on a daily basis or know what GTD is?

    I am seeking promotion in the next year or so in my current organisation and wanted to bring GTD up as part of the process as I manage a lot of IT Projects, some concurrently as well as performing technical support and feel that my use of GTD to manage myself may give me a competitive advantage over other people that don't use the method.

    Any feedback or advice would be greatly received.

  • #2
    I have not done it or not seen anybody doing it, so no idea of the reality. But what I think out of the box is using any GTD terminology including the term "GTD" itself may not be relevant to those who don't know about it. Some of them might have heard about it even as a "cult". Rather you might want to use descriptions on the lines of "proactive attitude and systematic approach towards responsibilities" and similar.

    About demonstrations, there would be many if you have been effectively applying GTD to your work. Just look at your past projects. By the way, have they not noticed it yet?

    Regards,
    Abhay

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    • #3
      Hi Abhay,

      My immediate line manager has noticed, and in some cases has started to duplicate some of my GTD processes in a small way for himself.

      However, it's not his decision, it's directors at a more senior level, that I don't come into contact with everyday, or in my "environment" that would make the final decision, hence my question.

      Thanks for your reply.

      Comment


      • #4
        Well, it depends on what you mean by "leverage."

        Can you use GTD principles and practices to be more effective than others? Yes, absolutely.

        Can you use GTD as a buzzword to try to impress senior management? I don't think so. As Abhay said, GTD isn't generally acknowledged as a benefit. It may look meaningless to others, and may look like you're trying to manufacture a competency.

        To be honest, when I was hiring people, I looked at accomplishments, and the skills learned therein. GTD's a methodology to get things done, and I didn't care what methodology people used. I'd be happy to hire someone who doesn't use any system at all but gets a lot of things done (with appropriate levels of quality, attention, etc.).

        So, if I were you, I'd focus on the things you accomplished as a GTD practitioner. No need to mention GTD; just mention all the things you've accomplished.

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        • #5
          Couldn't it be grouped together with memberships or perhaps along with certain program, process or project management skills? I am interested in adding GTD to my cv as well for my consulting services soon and would rather not have it looked at as a negative.

          Comment


          • #6
            I wonder, if there was written support material, as to whether you could put e.g. Attended GTD Roadmap as a continuous training type thing, like you might do for other classes/courses.

            But otherwise, I agree with the other comments, I think it's not about using GTD as a label, but more about the skills and behaviors that GTD supports.



            I have a question also thinking about this.

            If you are in an interview (for a new job or promotion) and you are asked if you have any questions... would you produce a list of written questions that you had prepared earlier and refer to them or just go from memory?

            Comment


            • #7
              My Opinion

              As someone from the HR world, I can say I think I'd be impressed by someone that produced a list of questions...as long as they were very specific to my company or that position. I think it would show thorough preparation!

              Originally posted by Paul@Pittsburgh View Post
              I wonder, if there was written support material, as to whether you could put e.g. Attended GTD Roadmap as a continuous training type thing, like you might do for other classes/courses.

              But otherwise, I agree with the other comments, I think it's not about using GTD as a label, but more about the skills and behaviors that GTD supports.



              I have a question also thinking about this.

              If you are in an interview (for a new job or promotion) and you are asked if you have any questions... would you produce a list of written questions that you had prepared earlier and refer to them or just go from memory?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Paul@Pittsburgh View Post
                If you are in an interview (for a new job or promotion) and you are asked if you have any questions... would you produce a list of written questions that you had prepared earlier and refer to them or just go from memory?
                I would associate at:

                No results without planning/preparation

                Comment


                • #9
                  Use GTD to hire and get hired!

                  Originally posted by rossbale View Post
                  Has anyone leveraged the fact that they practice the GTD methodology to gain a competitive advantage either for job interviews, promotion within existing organisation etc and how did you communicate or demonstrate it to people that may not work with you on a daily basis or know what GTD is?
                  Most definitely I've used GTD at job interviews, as both interviewee and interviewer. Moreover, some of us who are managers become candidates, voluntarily or involuntarily.

                  Something has disappeared in interviews today, the 3-letter word as Joe Biden put it. Yes, "jobs!" Some of these companies like the Microsoft's and Google's of the world have latched onto these puzzle interviews that have NOTHING to do with the job. I'm not going to a company to design manhole covers or estimate how many piano tuners are in Chicago. And when I conduct an interview I want to make the most productive use of my fellow professional's time.

                  So in GTD, so many times before we start something, we need to ask Why? Why are we holding this job interview, as employer or candidate?

                  Next, what will be the successful outcome of this interview? How do we make sure this interview will be productive to us all?

                  And then from that we can derive several Next Actions, including:
                  * who really needs to be at this interview?
                  * how will we prepare for it?
                  * what questions will we ask?

                  As a candidate, I've really hated when I see that the interviewer isn't prepared. Or at least that was before I saw GTD in action. So many of the organizations David Allen consults with are apparently in shambles. As I have seen, the reason is they don't really organize much. Don't let that sign of "people are our most important asset" fool you. Instead, you'll see that hiring is among the processes least given attention because there's not really much to show for progress in it. You can interview 80 people and still say there's nobody good for the job. Hogwash, many times the reason positions remain unfilled is because the management hasn't taken the time to really define it. (HR compounds this problem because they many times don't know how to talk shop.)

                  So no longer a victim, now if I see the mess, I can guide them towards that successful outcome. If I do come across any of those irrelevant questions, I ask them point blank, "Just how does this relate to the job?" They are going to make a big commitment towards me (salary, office equipment) and I towards them (career, life -- the 30,000/40,000 ft. views). We really need to make sure we understand the position and how to do it. (This has also helped me avoid companies and positions which weren't for me. It can help you show why you deserve a promotion and how you'll be ready to deliver.)

                  I've had people ask me then how is it that I zeroed in on what they wanted. I then tell them by helping them I helped myself. It is then that I tell them about GTD.

                  Competitive advantage? Yes, you can stand out by being more prepared than other applicants. That too I attribute to GTD.

                  Now if only my fellow managers would also be prepared, candidates everywhere would rejoice. We do speak after interviews which companies are hot and which ones aren't. (If I hear a company is bad, they move from Someday/Maybe to Trash!)
                  Last edited by QuestorTheElf; 04-03-2009, 12:57 PM.

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