Forum

  • If you are new to these Forums, please take a moment to register using the fields above.

Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Describe Most Duplicatable Implementation

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Describe Most Duplicatable Implementation

    What is the most easily teachable and duplicatable implementation of the GTD methodology? The reference system is easy, tickler is simple enough, calendar is duh.

    I'm looking for a way to set up my next actions lists within contexts, my projects list, my waiting list, my budget list (upcoming expenses and running total funds available), in a way that's accessible anywhere, professional looking, but cheap as dirt.

    I realize that OmniFocus is great, but if I use it, then anyone else that wants to follow in my footsteps is going to feel like they need to spend $80 and have a mac to be able to do what I do. I'm blessed with a large and expanding circle of influence, thus the reason for my asking.

    I realize this may be a challenge, but I'm determined. I need your help though!

    Thanks for opening discussion with me on this! If you feel comfortable and experienced enough to discuss this with me in real-time, I'll be online most of the evening via AIM: evanheckert and via gmail chat: evan.heckert (attt) G-male dot CoM

    Thanks!!

  • #2
    Probably paper.

    Least cost or can be, accessible anywhere you carry it, some inherent issues with lack of backup and hard to manage if you have lots of projects and someday maybes or can get unwieldy due to size but is certainly more accessible and not dependent on much technology.

    Comment


    • #3
      where can I find the best real-world examples? I would love to have a website to go to where someone describes their system in detail including photos. Maybe even a sample of their day and how they use the system throughout it.

      Just looking for a great example to emulate.

      <><
      michael

      Comment


      • #4
        GTD implementation = car?

        What's the best GTD implementation?

        This question is very similar to:

        What's the best car?

        It depends on your needs and personal preferences. You have to trust your car and believe that it will allow you to reach the destination. You have to trust your GTD implementation and believe that it will allow you to reach your goals. That's it.

        It does not matter if your car is red or blue if it is reliable but you may prefer red and have more satisfaction driving Ferrari than Fiat. On the other hand if you live in the mountains the better choice is a powerful SUV.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by TesTeq View Post
          What's the best GTD implementation?

          This question is very similar to:

          What's the best car?

          It depends on your needs and personal preferences. You have to trust your car and believe that it will allow you to reach the destination. You have to trust your GTD implementation and believe that it will allow you to reach your goals. That's it.

          It does not matter if your car is red or blue if it is reliable but you may prefer red and have more satisfaction driving Ferrari than Fiat. On the other hand if you live in the mountains the better choice is a powerful SUV.
          Exactly why I avoided that question. My question is very different.

          -Evan

          Comment


          • #6
            Use GTD Coordinator.

            Originally posted by ahheck01 View Post
            Exactly why I avoided that question. My question is very different.
            Use GTD Coordinator from David Allen Company.

            Comment


            • #7
              Surely the most duplicatable implementation is to read the book and decide if the system is right for you. I've been GTDing for 5 years now and I love it. I've got somewhat of a circle of influence in my company, and am even somewhat respected / renowned for being very organised. However, neither my colleagues, my team, my wife or my family are interested in adopting GTD. I'm aware of three who've read the book and started it out, but fell off the wagon within months.

              I sometimes think GTD (or being organised in general) is a bit like dental hygeine. Those that brush their teeth enjoy a bright smile, increased self confidence and a generally pain free existence, and those that don't often put up with discoloration, possibly pain, and possibly high dental bills and lower self confidence. They know they could avoid much of this with a simple daily routine but don't do it.

              Trying to figure out the best toothbrush/paste/floss combination for those people to use is probably not the Next Action
              Last edited by CoffinDodger; 06-18-2009, 04:38 AM. Reason: Correcting typos

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Oogiem View Post
                Probably paper.

                Least cost or can be, accessible anywhere you carry it, some inherent issues with lack of backup and hard to manage if you have lots of projects and someday maybes or can get unwieldy due to size but is certainly more accessible and not dependent on much technology.
                I'm with Oogie and Tes Teq on this. Paper is accessible anywhere, quite professional looking in my opinion, and can cost next to nothing (depending on exactly how you choose to put it together). DAC's GTD Coordinator will run you about $50 and it's the type of implementation I think you can really hit the ground running with, including have guidance sheets for each section included with the system to help you understand what each thing is (Notes, Calendar, Action Lists, Projects/Goals, etc.). You can also put something together from the information at diyplanner.com.

                The bottom line is that paper has the smallest learning curve (you already know how to read and write, I hope). You don't need a computer or to learning a new piece of software, no batteries required or to run down on you when you need them the most, and it's fully customizable as your understanding grows and your needs change/become apparent.

                Hope this helps.

                Comment


                • #9
                  More thoughts about paper

                  Here is a setup you could use that is cheap as dirt, puts all actions into lists you can access within 2 seconds, is portable, expandable, professional, and has sections for projects list, waiting for, and budget. As others have said, the best way to reach your objectives is to use paper.

                  As for examples, here is my exact setup. This system challenges ANY system when it comes to speed and versatility. Biggest disadvantage? You carry a binder with you when you leave the office, but you can leave the binder in the car if you're, say, in the movies.

                  Ready? Here we go:

                  Ingredients:
                  1) Ubiquitous Capture Tool: I carry 3x5 cards (blank side out looks) in a leather Note Jotter, which cost $10. I carry it one pocket, pen in the opposite, and can be writing an idea down within 1 second of having it, 2 if I'm seated.
                  2) 8 plastic dividers for a binder. I use Staples' Better Dividers, which cost 4.99.
                  3) 3-ring binder. I (again) use a 1" black Better Binder by Staples, but there are others. Mine was $8.49 but you can get a leather binder or whatever tickles your fancy. Note that this is a letter-size binder, not a mini. I chose letter-size because most of the paperwork I have is letter size--I can store a printout almost instantly.
                  4) the labeler that you undoubtedly already have.
                  5) Paper. I have a ream of heavy, bright white copier paper (cheap, feels good, and lots of clean space to mind map or get out ideas), a ream of colored card stock (good for calendars or other commonly-referred to pages).
                  6) a pen. I use the Uniball Signo 207, black, because it's cheap, looks plenty good, and is archival quality and chemical-resistant.

                  Your (my) sections are exactly as David Allen recommended in the Organizing a Portable Planner pdf (available free from this site):
                  1) Notes/"In"--several dozen blank pages for starting lists ad hoc, taking notes, or taking advantage of small chunks of time to plan, mind map, etc. The UCT works wherever this notebook is not (I am never in meetings without my binder, for instance, but often take phone calls that require notes when I am away from my planner).
                  2) Calendar
                  I use a laser printer (no smearing) to print a monthly calendar on card stock. Why monthly? Because it requires the fewest pages but is big enough for my own needs. I use my Calendar as my Tickler file and file the tickled items in gen ref.
                  3) Action lists:
                  This is for all of your contexts (I now have: Anywhere, Calls, Computer, Errands, Home, Office, Waiting For). Up until recently I had contexts based on equipment: Briefcase (i.e. Anywhere), Car, Computer, File cabinet (e.g. for tasks that required Project Support materials only in the office), Home. Sort Contexts alphabetically (Anywhere is the best one to have first anyway). I prefer to handwrite these, so I can put more items directly into the system. I used to use a word processor, handwrite on them during the week, and update/print out a new one with each Weekly Review. I found that inefficient, as I had to double enter.
                  4) Agendas
                  If you have a meeting or key individuals you need to talk to about several things, put it in here, sorted A-Z by meeting or person. Your significant other is a good one, for instance.
                  5) Projects/Goals
                  1st in this section is your Projects List, 20k-50k views/goals/vision, and, if you want, your Someday Maybe list of potential future projects.
                  6) Project Plans
                  Depending on where i am in a particular project, this section contains the mind map to a new project (if it is one of those 20% of projects that require external brainstorming). At the office, I process my mind map and organize a one-page project plan in my word processor (Outline View), and print that out.
                  7) Reference/Misc.
                  This is your catch-all for things that don't fit well under other categories. Mine contains several checklists and lists.
                  Tel/Add
                  This is your contact manager. This is a printout, as it is much easier to change the data if it is digital. I use a simple two-column layout in a word processor. I write down all new or changed contact information in the margin and input it during my Weekly Review.

                  As I say, the only disadvantage I know of is that you have a binder that is bulkier than, say, a cell phone or Hipster PDA. I carry a briefcase, so it's not much of an issue.

                  No software can offer the same versatility, unless you never leave your office to do anything. I can get a phone call, open my binder, take notes on a fresh sheet of paper, and then toss it into my Inbox (if I don't have time to process right away), or process the new tasks/projects straight onto my lists and have it in my system. I'm never further than my briefcase/car to be able to capture and process at high efficiency.

                  This was an example of one possible setup. I didn't describe my workspace, as you already understand the filing system, etc.

                  Hope this helps!
                  JohnV474
                  Last edited by JohnV474; 06-22-2009, 04:41 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    That's awesome - very by-the-book!

                    What are some other paper setups people are using?

                    -Evan

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have a fairly simple setup.
                      1. 3x5" index cards in my pocket, with a pen.
                      2. A clipboard with two pieces of paper. The top page lists my NAs, and the bottom lists my Projects.
                      3. A tickler in a filing cabinet.
                      4. Someday/Maybe and Waiting For text files on my computer.
                      5. Google Calendar

                      Items 2, 3, and 4 are duplicated at home and at work.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Brent's setup

                        Brent,

                        I admire the simplicity of your system--very streamlined but not lacking the core elements. "As simple as possible, but no simpler."

                        One positive about starting with such a system is you can see exactly with how much simplicity you can be effective, and add on "modules" if any part gets big enough to stretch the seams.

                        I recently went back to my 100% stock setup to then test out whether it is too simple or too complex for my current needs. So far so good!

                        JohnV474

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I also like how Brent's system encompasses all 'dimensions: it is online, it is digital yet paper-based, it is mobile, it uses pre-electronic era office equipment. He can use ist while sitting, while standing, while running even. It's more Jedi, less StarTrek.

                          re the original post

                          A paper binder I guess. You can print out from computer-driven calendars. It is flexible, does not press the user into one specific paradigm (like outliner or outlook). It creates a traceable artefact, something I think supports the learning experience when starting out.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JohnV474 View Post
                            Ingredients:
                            1) Ubiquitous Capture Tool: I carry 3x5 cards (blank side out looks) in a leather Note Jotter, which cost $10. I carry it one pocket, pen in the opposite, and can be writing an idea down within 1 second of having it, 2 if I'm seated.
                            2) 8 plastic dividers for a binder. I use Staples' Better Dividers, which cost 4.99.
                            3) 3-ring binder. I (again) use a 1" black Better Binder by Staples, but there are others. Mine was $8.49 but you can get a leather binder or whatever tickles your fancy. Note that this is a letter-size binder, not a mini. I chose letter-size because most of the paperwork I have is letter size--I can store a printout almost instantly.
                            4) the labeler that you undoubtedly already have.
                            5) Paper. I have a ream of heavy, bright white copier paper (cheap, feels good, and lots of clean space to mind map or get out ideas), a ream of colored card stock (good for calendars or other commonly-referred to pages).
                            6) a pen. I use the Uniball Signo 207, black, because it's cheap, looks plenty good, and is archival quality and chemical-resistant.

                            Your (my) sections are exactly as David Allen recommended in the Organizing a Portable Planner pdf (available free from this site):
                            1) Notes/"In"--several dozen blank pages for starting lists ad hoc, taking notes, or taking advantage of small chunks of time to plan, mind map, etc. The UCT works wherever this notebook is not (I am never in meetings without my binder, for instance, but often take phone calls that require notes when I am away from my planner).
                            2) Calendar
                            I use a laser printer (no smearing) to print a monthly calendar on card stock. Why monthly? Because it requires the fewest pages but is big enough for my own needs. I use my Calendar as my Tickler file and file the tickled items in gen ref.
                            3) Action lists:
                            This is for all of your contexts (I now have: Anywhere, Calls, Computer, Errands, Home, Office, Waiting For). Up until recently I had contexts based on equipment: Briefcase (i.e. Anywhere), Car, Computer, File cabinet (e.g. for tasks that required Project Support materials only in the office), Home. Sort Contexts alphabetically (Anywhere is the best one to have first anyway). I prefer to handwrite these, so I can put more items directly into the system. I used to use a word processor, handwrite on them during the week, and update/print out a new one with each Weekly Review. I found that inefficient, as I had to double enter.
                            4) Agendas
                            If you have a meeting or key individuals you need to talk to about several things, put it in here, sorted A-Z by meeting or person. Your significant other is a good one, for instance.
                            5) Projects/Goals
                            1st in this section is your Projects List, 20k-50k views/goals/vision, and, if you want, your Someday Maybe list of potential future projects.
                            6) Project Plans
                            Depending on where i am in a particular project, this section contains the mind map to a new project (if it is one of those 20% of projects that require external brainstorming). At the office, I process my mind map and organize a one-page project plan in my word processor (Outline View), and print that out.
                            7) Reference/Misc.
                            This is your catch-all for things that don't fit well under other categories. Mine contains several checklists and lists.
                            Tel/Add
                            This is your contact manager. This is a printout, as it is much easier to change the data if it is digital. I use a simple two-column layout in a word processor. I write down all new or changed contact information in the margin and input it during my Weekly Review.
                            My setup is almost exactly like yours! Ha... and I'm a techy person! Go figure.

                            Some differences in my own setup:

                            Ubiquitous Capture Tool:
                            -- small pad and pen (for jotting ideas, etc.)
                            -- small Olympus digital recorder (for ideas and notes when paper and pen isn't as convenient to use -- for example, when I'm walking fast outside, going down an elevator, taking an evening walk (esp. when it's dark outside), etc.
                            -- cell phone (used esp. for errands, with each item entered into a "@errands" checklist on my WM smartphone)

                            Portable 3-ring Binder:
                            -- mini 5.5"x 8.5 black Avery binder, which contains dividers for various sections:
                            1. "Actions" for my main action lists (3 of them: @computer, @calls and @home; also carry a duplicate written out @errands list --> in case the @errands list in my phone dies on me, or if my phone breaks or something...)
                            2. "Projects" section: contains my "Projects List" and also a bunch of "Project Outline" sheets for putting down ideas and next actions for each new project I want to start now or in the future.
                            ---> 1 project per sheet: name of project listed on top of page followed by the next actions for the project (as they come to mind)
                            ---> Then later, as I develop a clearer picture of all the project's moving parts, I move each project's individual next actions to one of my action lists mentioned in #1 above.
                            3. "Calendar" section: contains my all-important weekly Monday-Sunday planner, with enough room to write down hard landscape dates, appointments, ppl to call back, etc. for each day.
                            ---> This section is divided into tabs for each month ("June", "July", "August", etc.)
                            ---> Each month contains the excellent "Weekly Planning" templates from http://www.diyplanner.com/ .

                            I also carry around my mini binder everywhere. Basically I have these things with me most of the time: (1) small portable binder (contains pen and paper), (2) cell phone and (3) digital recorder.

                            Pretty straightforward setup that I think is easy enough to duplicate.

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X