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Sleep & Problem Solving

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  • Sleep & Problem Solving

    Not exactly GTD, but a very interesting read

    http://www.cbc.ca/stories/2004/01/21/sleep_mem040121

    and btw, how long do you feel you need to sleep to be fully "active"

    I think I need around 9 hours... unfortunately I usuallly only get 6

  • #2
    Hey, nifty article, thanks for posting. Personally, 8 hours is ok and 9 is ideal.

    They should do the test on GTDers and non-GTDers to scientifically quantify the benefit of not having your brain full of "gotta do that"s!

    Taxgeek

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    • #3
      8-9 hours?! I function best on 5-6. Occassionally I'll get 7 but that's rare and I usually drag all day if I do get any more than that.

      I have learned that if I focus on solving a problem before going to bed that I can essentially program my brain, like I would program a ccomputer, to continue searching for a solution. Then when my brain finds the solution to the problem I'll wake up with that on the front of my mind.

      Thanx,
      Ricky

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      • #4
        "8-9 hours?! I function best on 5-6. Occassionally I'll get 7 but that's rare and I usually drag all day if I do get any more than that."

        What you say is possible, but unlikely. There are more people in denial of needing more sleep, then they choose to get (or can get given life demands...) then there are people who actually only need 5-6 hours sleep. Have you ever gone away for 2 weeks where there were no demands on your time, nothing to do. How long did you sleep at the end of that vacation, or were you ever in that situation (recently)?

        Lack of enough sleep is very insidious and impairs decision making, judgement, as well as impairing your health. There have been a number of articles on the health detriments of lack of sleep as well as books on this issue. I speak as a physician, who has frequently not gotten enough sleep, but who has done what I can to minimize the adverse health effects, and is reforming in that I'm really striving to get 8 hours sleep (as much as the job allows).

        Scott

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        • #5
          I need 8 hours, pretty much on the dot. An hour less or more and I feel like I'm moving through mud. My husband, on the other hand, does fine with 4-5. I've given up on trying to maintain the same sleep schedule with him.

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          • #6
            "8-9 hours?! I function best on 5-6. Occassionally I'll get 7 but that's rare and I usually drag all day if I do get any more than that."

            What you say is possible, but unlikely.
            Yep, that really does seem to be where I function best. It may be rare, but it works for me.

            Have you ever gone away for 2 weeks where there were no demands on your time, nothing to do. How long did you sleep at the end of that vacation, or were you ever in that situation (recently)?
            I've NEVER had a two week vacation. I typically only take a few days of vacation at a time and they are usually activity packed days. I've never been able to "just relax" in the purest sense of the word. I'm always doing something and it's usually productive or creative. Recently I've started getting involved in a number of discussion forums such as this. I find this to be relaxing, but a far cry from "nothing to do".

            When I do go on vacation or don't have to go to bed and get up a certain time, I still seem to sleep about 5-6 hours. I will go 7 sometimes if I'm really, really tired or stressed. That's rare, however.

            Thanx,
            Ricky

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            • #7
              For years, I got by on 6 hours a night, thinking that was all I needed. In a moment of clarity, I realized that my creativity and problem-solving skills had declined. I took a 2-week vacation, determined that it would be a "do-nothing" one where I did whatever I wanted. It was not to be a scheduled, rushed time off, but one where I would not set the alarm. I also chose to use a set bedtime every night. My sleep hours slowly lengthened, and by the end of the two weeks, I was waking up at almost exactly 8 hours on the dot.

              I have since planned my sleep accordingly: a set bedtime that allows 8 hours of sleep before I need to get up for my work day. I keep the same bedtime on weekends, but do not set an alarm, and I still wake up at almost 8 hours on the dot.

              Much to my surprise, I am more productive, feel less stressed, and have been able to meet deadlines with ease. My supervisees have even noted and commented on my more relaxed behavior and appearance.

              I don't advocate 8 hours for everyone, but I would recommend that you work on discovering your own optimum sleep schedule. It makes a world of difference in GTD.

              Carolyn

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