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  • Data organisation for GTD (+ small question on ticklers)

    Hi,
    Am beginning my application of GTD, and one of the things that I need for organise is my data on my computer. Any tips on folder structuring? I will be deleting anything that I can, however I am still going to have a heap of stuff - what I can I will put into a note application (evernote or springpad, haven't decided yet).
    Also, I need to sort my Firefox bookmarks :P Over 2000 to go though. Will be setting up my note application first so any information I need to keep can go in there, but any tips on how you sort yours?
    And lastly, I was wondering how a task would be dealt with if it has a due-date, but can be done at any time, provided it is before that date. My software (toodledo) allows setting a due date, would you do that? I know the calendar is sacred for things that must be done at a specific time/day, but wasn't sure about this.
    Cheers

  • #2
    Originally posted by c.barber78 View Post
    Hi,
    And lastly, I was wondering how a task would be dealt with if it has a due-date, but can be done at any time, provided it is before that date. My software (toodledo) allows setting a due date, would you do that?
    Quick answer, perhaps not very helpful --- what do you mean by task? Standard GTD doesn't have "tasks" - you have projects (which could have one or more due dates) and next actions (which never have a due date, because they are very small and hence achieving them by date X is itself of little value).

    Perhaps more helpful --- I have a special list of external deadlines (in Remember the Milk, but could be on a calendar) and some of my project plans have target completion dates and intermediate milestones in them.

    The current NA in each project doesn't have a due date - when deciding what NA to do next, the proximity of project deadlines in one thing I consider. The weekly review keeps me on top of everything (I look over the deadlines list and all the project plans).


    yours,
    rob

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Rob78 View Post
      Quick answer, perhaps not very helpful --- what do you mean by task? Standard GTD doesn't have "tasks" - you have projects (which could have one or more due dates) and next actions (which never have a due date, because they are very small and hence achieving them by date X is itself of little value).

      Perhaps more helpful --- I have a special list of external deadlines (in Remember the Milk, but could be on a calendar) and some of my project plans have target completion dates and intermediate milestones in them.

      The current NA in each project doesn't have a due date - when deciding what NA to do next, the proximity of project deadlines in one thing I consider. The weekly review keeps me on top of everything (I look over the deadlines list and all the project plans).


      yours,
      rob
      Ah that is quite helpful, and thank you very much for the answer it is much appreciated.

      Yes, I was referring to next actions. Regarding GTD, do next actions include all individual actions? What about actions that must come later in a project? Does next actions include sub-actions of projects? (e.g. the next action of a project)?

      Also, I was wondering how to appropriately organise my contexts (set as tags, and toodledo allows selecting multiple tags)
      Regarding these things, I have a desktop pc at home, an iPhone which is NOT always with me, and I have internet at home which is NOT always connected.
      I have tasks that fall into the categories of (in the brackets at the end I have given what these tasks would currently be tagged as, however I am finding that it doesn't work great as it is not distinguishing between @x or @x, and @x & @x.
      • some tasks that I would only want to complete on the internet on my desktop pc (e.g. research printers - too slow on the iphone) [@web, @desktop]
      • some that only require my desktop computer (e.g. install software) [@desktop]
      • some that require my desktop pc and the internet (different from the first section in a way, e.g. looking at software options which requries the pc for testing the software, or process x file into Evernote) [@desktop, @web]
      • some that require my iPhone and the web (e.g. install x app) [@iPhone, @web]
      • and some that can be done on the internet on my iPhone or my computer (e.g. some read/review). [@web]
      How should I change this? I was thinking possibly using @web-desktop, @web, @desktop, @iphone?
      Would love some suggestions (on everything :P - esp. this and the GTD file structuring).

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by c.barber78 View Post
        do next actions include all individual actions? What about actions that must come later in a project?
        The default standard is that you only put the actual physical next action on your lists. You may also choose to put additional independent next actions on your lists. Any actions that are dependent on finishing something else first should NOT be on your lists.

        However, that said, a lot of GTD SW allows you to put in all the actions you have thought of but then only make available the next action.

        On Contexts, play with what works. I find it best to define my contexts by the critical item. So while I have a phone list, the critical item for some of my calls is during business hours so I now have 2 lists, @phone and @phone business hours. Feel free to make , use and delete contexts as appropriate for you. It takes a fair bit of time to develop the contexts that work best for you.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Oogiem View Post
          The default standard is that you only put the actual physical next action on your lists. You may also choose to put additional independent next actions on your lists. Any actions that are dependent on finishing something else first should NOT be on your lists.

          However, that said, a lot of GTD SW allows you to put in all the actions you have thought of but then only make available the next action.

          On Contexts, play with what works. I find it best to define my contexts by the critical item. So while I have a phone list, the critical item for some of my calls is during business hours so I now have 2 lists, @phone and @phone business hours. Feel free to make , use and delete contexts as appropriate for you. It takes a fair bit of time to develop the contexts that work best for you.
          Oh okay hadn't really realised that! Thanks for clearing it up. Why is it done that way?
          Does that mean all the actions that are waiting for another action to be completed must be stored in our heads??
          Any tips on the data organisation?
          Last edited by c.barber78; 03-17-2010, 02:20 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by c.barber78 View Post
            Does that mean all the actions that are waiting for another action to be completed must be stored in our heads??
            No, they are stored in Project Support. You can/should have project plans, at least for the bigger projects, with all the items on them that the natural planning process creates: purpose statement, successfull outcome, mission criticals and so on.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Cpu_Modern View Post
              No, they are stored in Project Support. You can/should have project plans, at least for the bigger projects, with all the items on them that the natural planning process creates: purpose statement, successfull outcome, mission criticals and so on.
              Ah okay I see.
              Regarding in baskets, why is a sideloading tray specified? I.e. what is the problem with a front loading tray?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by c.barber78 View Post
                Ah okay I see.
                Regarding in baskets, why is a sideloading tray specified? I.e. what is the problem with a front loading tray?
                I think the only importance of the type of tray is what fits you best. I have front-loading and it's great.

                Comment


                • #9
                  David does specifically recommend side loading

                  David Allen does specifically recommend side loading because his experience is that it's easier to get things in and out of it versus front loading.

                  Comment

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