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  • Replacing Hanging Files With Manila File Folders---Questions....

    1. I have materials and notes from numerous authors that relate to marketing. I want to keep them all together under the topic "Marketing," separate from my client and prospect files. Each author, company or marketing strategy (ie. telemarketing, direct response ads) their own manila file. Keeping in mind that there's a mix of authors, companies, seminars that I attended and strategies, how would you keep all the marketing-related files together?

    Note: Even if I use a bunch of expandable file jackets to keep all these manila files together, how can I make it clear in the file drawer that these files are under topic Marketing?

    Do you use a larger than normal manila file as a divider to separate marketing from reference files that begin win the letter L or M?

    2. David Allen recommends that we get rid of hanging files and use just plain folders standing up by themselves in the file drawer "held up by the movable metal plate in the back." I have several high quality file drawers that don't have this metal plate in the back. What are you using in lieu of a movable metal plate to hold your manila files upright in drawers?
    Last edited by prouddad; 05-12-2010, 03:17 PM. Reason: changed font

  • #2
    2. David Allen recommends that we get rid of hanging files and use just plain folders standing up by themselves in the file drawer "held up by the movable metal plate in the back." I have several high quality file drawers that don't have this metal plate in the back. What are you using in lieu of a movable metal plate to hold your manila files upright in drawers?
    Good luck finding these filing cabinets. I have talked to some suppliers who said they can deliver one; you can also buy these metal plates separate (as an add-on). I think David Allen uses Herman Miller Passage desking system that already has these plates.

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    • #3
      I work with a variety of projects and departments at my company. When I make my labels, I use the two line option on my label maker to make labels for my file cabinet
      I'll put my category and/or project name on the top line and more details on the second line

      ie:
      MARKETING: FLYER
      Effectiveness Report

      you could do
      MARKETING: SEMINARS
      Seth Godin

      MARKETING STRATEGY
      Telemarketing
      etc.

      I try to name my project lists in Outlook similarly so that I can easily sort by department, etc.

      I've had similar problems with drawers in the past (lucky to have an old ugly metal desk with that design right now), and have had luck with metal bookends and large paperweights to be my drawer stop. I've also had times where I've ignored the hanging folder advice from David and used them anyways due to drawer design limitations. Right now, even w/a good drawer stop, I'm using hanging folders as dividers between major sections to help me get to files faster.

      Comment


      • #4
        Metal Plates

        Originally posted by prouddad View Post
        1
        2. David Allen recommends that we get rid of hanging files and use just plain folders standing up by themselves in the file drawer "held up by the movable metal plate in the back." I have several high quality file drawers that don't have this metal plate in the back. What are you using in lieu of a movable metal plate to hold your manila files upright in drawers?
        I got some metal bookend with magnetic bottoms (normally used for metal bookshelves). They work ok, especially when I added some weight to them.

        Randy

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        • #5
          Okay, at first I was really obsessing about the file folders too, and researched online and on this forum etc.

          What I found shocked me: it's not about the folders (or cabinets), it's about the system. Different people use VERY different things. So I'm using a mix of hanging file folders and various other folders too. Just used what was available, made some from old calendars, and only bought very few.
          Used a cushion as a file stop at a time, now I have too many folders in the cabinet already (will probably need to weed), don't really need a file stop.

          I don't use separate file dividers, sometimes the hanging files feature as such.

          It depends how big the files are: for some, I have a bigger binder/folder that I just put into the cabinet together with other files, the important thing is to have it labelled. Some have mini-files or tabs for sub-projects (this is not strictly GTD, but sort of useful for time-being. My system is still evolving, and this is for not very urgent projects that I don't take out much. If I needed to take in and out a specific file often, I'd take it out and position it separately.)
          For some things, I have similar to what mkeeneo writes. (Multiple folders that start similarly, and are thus positioned next to each other.)
          Key is to have labels that are clearly seen from where you look - if you continue to use hanging files together with manila folders, consider tabs with labels for manila folders long enough so they are easily seen. (This mostly works if you don't need to bring them on trips often, sometimes they may get scrunched a bit if transported. Or maybe if one folded them back? I use paper clips+carton as tabs - not strict GTD either, seems to work mostly okay, especially if not taken in and out much. For any crucial info might want to avoid the paper clips though, yeah.)

          For some things, it's easier to find them if they are in their own separate pretty folder away from the filing cabinet, together with books on the topic. So, it depends. Do you need to access these notes often? How do you think of them? Is it important that you find them by topic or author? Or is it easier to remember they were at a seminar together? When you look for them, what do you think of first? (I have some seminar notes in a folder together, cause I know they are seminar notes.) Do you just need them for an occasional or very rare reference? (In that case, even a binder might be okay?)
          What is your purpose to put them in manila folders? Might make it easier to decide...
          Last edited by Layla; 05-21-2010, 01:06 PM.

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          • #6
            Marketing Files

            I recently listend to the Road to Black Belt webinar on my free two week trial of GTD connect. One of the lessons learned for me was that it is OK to have more than one filing system. If you have a lot of marketing related items that you need alphabetized, just create a new drawer or section in the drawer with some obvious dividers...."only as many as you need, no more"

            I don't get filing without hanging folders. I hope to one day as it seems a waste to put a folder in another folder, but it works so well.

            Comment


            • #7
              Your two-week trial

              Has the material (beside what you sited) been helpful to you? What do you think of GTD Connect so far? Has it given you much clarity that you couldn't get in the public forum or the GTD books?

              Comment


              • #8
                two week trial

                My two week trial was great. It was a little bit of a whirlwind for me because I knew that I couldn't afford to become a permanent member. I blasted through many of the old recorded webinars and read a couple of dozen white papers.

                For me, the value was in motivating me to take my system to the next level. Every time I go back through one of David's books, the white papers, or the webinars, I find a little tid bit that gives me a deeper understanding. I thought my system was great until I realized this week the value of removing due dates, getting an out box for my desk, and using the tickler files. All those items are probably in the book, but to hear it again in a different form (webinar video) worked for me.

                I suggest that everyone use the free trial, it is a great support system but clear your schedule for two weeks to take advantage of all the resources if you don't think you can afford it.

                I am new to the public forum so I can't comment on the value vs. GTD Connect. I didn't take any time to use the GTD Connect forum either; too much other good stuff.

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