Archive for January, 2012

Getting your Startup Under Control
A
D
P

Getting your Startup Under Control

In this interview on The Dorm Room Tycoon, David Allen, author of Getting Things Done, explains how entrepreneurs can be in control, and why planning and having an overall purpose is key.

A Writer’s GTD Journey
P

A Writer’s GTD Journey

GTD seems to me a very intuitive way of managing your psychology so that it does not disrupt workflow.

What makes a good business book?
A
D
P

What makes a good business book?

Why do you think [Getting Things Done] was so successful and resonated with the business world? I think people were hungry for a model that was hip enough and current enough to deal with the kind of world everyone was in.

Get it all out of your head
D
P

Get it all out of your head

If you’re still relatively careless about having seamless collection tools because they know they don’t represent discrete, whole systems anyway: there’s an incomplete set of things in their inboxes and an incomplete set in their mind, and they’re not getting any payoff from either one, so the thinking goes. It’s like trying to play pinball […]

Questions for completing and beginning the year
D
P

Questions for completing and beginning the year

What have you actually finished, completed, and accomplished? If you haven’t made a list in the last year, I would highly recommend that you give yourself a treat and review the year that just passed and look forward to the year ahead.

Cool GTD tip for tracking Waiting For items in Outlook
P

Cool GTD tip for tracking Waiting For items in Outlook

Many people have found this tip we share in our GTD & Outlook 2010 Guide to be super helpful for corralling the myriad of emails that need to be tracked as a “Waiting For.” You simply need to create a rule in Outlook to copy delegated items to an @Waiting For Support folder (create that […]

Are you a perfectionist?
D

Are you a perfectionist?

Q: Any tips for those of us who get paralyzed by perfection? David Allen: Just focus on doing the next action perfectly, which is a lot easier than trying to be perfect about how you approach something bigger. Be as retentive as you want. The only problem is when it stops action. Be a perfectionist […]